I try to implement the Visitor pattern with templated derived classes

I work with gcc 4.5

here is the VisitorTemplate.hpp, I specialized Derived in the class Visitor, but I'd like to be able to handle any type:

edit : thanks to the suggestions of interjay, the code compiles and runs without errors now

#ifndef VISITORTEMPLATE_HPP_
#define VISITORTEMPLATE_HPP_

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

template<class T> Derived;

class Visitor
{
  public:
    virtual void visit(Derived<string> *e) = 0;
};

class Base
{
  public:
    virtual void accept(class Visitor *v) = 0;
};

template<class T>
Derived: public Base
{
  public:
    virtual void accept(Visitor *v)
    {
       v->visit(this);
    }
    string display(T arg)
    {
       string s = "This is : " + to_string(arg);
       return s;
    }
};

class UpVisitor: public Visitor
{
   virtual void visit(Derived<string> *e)
   {
     cout << "do Up on " + e->display("test") << '\n';
   }
};

class DownVisitor: public Visitor
{
   virtual void visit(Derived<string> *e)
   {
     cout << "do Down on " + e->display("test") << '\n';
   }
};

#endif /* VISITORTEMPLATE_HPP_ */

main.cpp

Base* base = new Derived<string>();
Visitor* up = new UpVisitor();
Visitor* down = new DownVisitor();
base->accept(up);
base->accept(down);

Now my goal is to use Derived in visit without specializing; unfortunately, visit is a virtual method so I can't template it

  • What compiler are you using? I just fed your example code to Visual C++ 2010 and it compiled quite happily, apart from complaining that std::to_string can't handle the template parameter argument type. I can't see any reason in your example code why it would complain about an incomplete type, as you didn't miss out providing implementations for the single pure virtual function. – Matthew Walton Oct 24 '11 at 13:22
  • @MatthewWalton: "I work with gcc 4.5." However, it's always nice to indicate the lines compiler messages refer to. I don't want to count 31 lines in my browser. – sbi Oct 24 '11 at 13:27
  • @sbi doh, I must've forgotten that when I was feeding my compiler the code. Still, I wouldn't think that particular kind of error is the kind that GCC and VC++ would disagree on. – Matthew Walton Oct 24 '11 at 13:36
  • ok, forget my code, have you an idea to handle this generic Vistor problem ? – codablank1 Oct 24 '11 at 13:38
  • Interesting. It seems that forward declaration of the class doesn't go quite hand in hand with templates – iammilind Oct 24 '11 at 13:40

From Modern C++ - Design Generic Programming and Design Patterns Applied - Andrei Alexandrescu

#include <iostream>

class BaseVisitor
{
    public:
        virtual ~BaseVisitor() {};
};

template <class T, typename R = int>
class Visitor
{
    public:
        virtual R visit(T &) = 0;
};

template <typename R = int>
class BaseVisitable
{
    public:
        typedef R ReturnType;
        virtual ~BaseVisitable() {};
        virtual ReturnType accept(BaseVisitor & )
        {
            return ReturnType(0);
        }
    protected:
        template <class T>
        static ReturnType acceptVisitor(T &visited, BaseVisitor &visitor)
        {
            if (Visitor<T> *p = dynamic_cast< Visitor<T> *> (&visitor))
            {
                return p->visit(visited);
            }
            return ReturnType(-1);
        }

        #define VISITABLE() \
            virtual ReturnType accept(BaseVisitor &v) \
                { return acceptVisitor(*this, v); }
};


/** example of use */
class Visitable1 : public BaseVisitable<int>
{
    /* Visitable accept one BaseVisitor */
    public:
        VISITABLE();
};

class Visitable2 : public BaseVisitable<int>
{
    /* Visitable accept one BaseVisitor */
    public:
        VISITABLE();
};

class VisitorDerived : public BaseVisitor,
        public Visitor<Visitable1, int>,
        public Visitor<Visitable2, int>
{
    public:
        int visit(Visitable1 & c)
        {
            std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
        }
        int visit(Visitable2 & c)
        {
            std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
        }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    VisitorDerived visitor;
    Visitable1 visitable1;
    Visitable2 visitable2;

    visitable1.accept(visitor);
    visitable2.accept(visitor);
}

Is possible to avoid dynamic_cast with CRTP pattern like:

#include <iostream>

class BaseVisitor
{
    public:
        virtual ~BaseVisitor() {};
};

template <class T>
class Visitor
{
    public:
        virtual void visit(T &) = 0;
};

template <class Visitable>
class BaseVisitable
{ 
    public:
        template <typename T>
        void accept(T & visitor)
        {
            visitor.visit(static_cast<Visitable &>(*this));
        }
};

/** example of use */
class Visitable1 : public BaseVisitable<Visitable1>
{
};

class Visitable2 : public BaseVisitable<Visitable2>
{
};

class VisitorDerived : public BaseVisitor, 
                       public Visitor<Visitable1>,
                       public Visitor<Visitable2>
{
    public:
        void visit(Visitable1 & c)
        {
            std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
        }
        void visit(Visitable2 & c)
        {
            std::cout << __PRETTY_FUNCTION__ << std::endl;
        }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    VisitorDerived visitor;
    Visitable1 visitable1;
    Visitable2 visitable2;

    visitable1.accept<VisitorDerived>(visitor);
    visitable2.accept<VisitorDerived>(visitor);
}
  • I find it a little complicated; is it possible to avoid the dynamic_cast ? – codablank1 Oct 24 '11 at 14:58
  • 1
    Yes, you can use CRTP pattern like: – Tio Pepe Oct 24 '11 at 21:05
  • How would you extend this to cover hierarchies, e.g. DerivedVisitable1, while keeping the static_cast? Is it possible without changing to the cyclic implementation? – John Neuhaus Nov 19 '15 at 14:37
  • How could this code be changed to allow for a container of BaseVisitables. Using the first example, I could have an "std::vector<BaseVisitable>", but I can't for the second since the BaseVisitable is templated. – Leo C Han Aug 2 '17 at 1:47

Your Derived class cannot use Visitor because it hasn't been defined yet (it was only forward declared, and is therefore an incomplete type).

You can fix the compile error by putting the Visitor definition before Derived. You will also need to forward-declare Derived before defining Visitor:

template <class T> class Derived;

class Visitor {
public:
    virtual void visit(Derived<string> *e) = 0;
};

template <class T>
class Derived : public Base {
    //.... can call Visitor methods here ...
};

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