48

A new problem has arisen for me as I tried to run my script on a different PHP Server.

ON my old server the following code appears to work fine - even when no s parameter is declared.

<?php
 if ($_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
if ($_GET['s'] == 'aquinas')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">"; 
 if ($_GET['s'] == 'POP2')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
elseif ($_GET['s'] == null)
echo "<body>"
?>

But now, on a my local server on my local machine (XAMPP - Apache) I get the following error when no value for s is defined.

Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 43
Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 45
Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 47
Notice: Undefined index: s in C:\xampp\htdocs\teaching\index.php on line 49

What I want to happen for the script to call certain javascript functions if a value is declared for s, but if nothing is declared i would like the page to load normally.

Can you help me?

2
  • 2
    The new server has debug notices enabled. Check for error_reporting in the php.ini. It should not be E_ALL on a production server. – mario Oct 24 '11 at 14:07
  • 1
    Simply you can use isset function to check it is recieved properly or not – Anupam Haldkar May 10 '20 at 8:52

12 Answers 12

76

Error reporting will have not included notices on the previous server which is why you haven't seen the errors.

You should be checking whether the index s actually exists in the $_GET array before attempting to use it.

Something like this would be suffice:

if (isset($_GET['s'])) {
    if ($_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
    else if ($_GET['s'] == 'aquinas')
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">"; 
    else if ($_GET['s'] == 'POP2')
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
} else {
    echo "<body>";
}

It may be beneficial (if you plan on adding more cases) to use a switch statement to make your code more readable.

switch ((isset($_GET['s']) ? $_GET['s'] : '')) {
    case 'jwshxnsyllabus':
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
        break;
    case 'aquinas':
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">";
        break;
    case 'POP2':
        echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
        break;
    default:
        echo "<body>";
        break;
}

EDIT: BTW, the first set of code I wrote mimics what yours is meant to do in it's entirety. Is the expected outcome of an unexpected value in ?s= meant to output no <body> tag or was this an oversight? Note that the switch will fix this by always defaulting to <body>.

1
  • 2
    more better solution than me. +1 for that – Awais Qarni Oct 24 '11 at 14:11
7

Get into the habit of checking if a variable is available with isset, e.g.

if (isset($_GET['s']))
{
     //do stuff that requires 's'
}
else
{
     //do stuff that doesn't need 's'
}

You could disable notice reporting, but dealing them is good hygiene, and can allow you to spot problems you might otherwise miss.

6

I always use a utility function/class for reading from the $_GET and $_POST arrays to avoid having to always check the index exists... Something like this will do the trick.

class Input {
function get($name) {
    return isset($_GET[$name]) ? $_GET[$name] : null;
}

function post($name) {
    return isset($_POST[$name]) ? $_POST[$name] : null;
}

function get_post($name) {
    return $this->get($name) ? $this->get($name) : $this->post($name);
}
}
$input = new Input;
$page = $input->get_post('page');
3

I was having the same problem in localhost with xampp. Now I'm using this combination of parameters:

// Report all errors except E_NOTICE
// This is the default value set in php.ini
error_reporting(E_ALL ^ E_NOTICE);

php.net: http://php.net/manual/pt_BR/function.error-reporting.php

1

First check the $_GET['s'] is set or not. Change your conditions like this

<?php
if (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml',         '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')\">";
elseif (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == 'aquinas')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')\">"; 
elseif (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == 'POP2')
echo "<body onload=\"loadSyllabi('POP2')\">";
elseif (isset($_GET['s']) && $_GET['s'] == null)
echo "<body>"
?>

And also handle properly your ifelse conditions

1

Actually none of the proposed answers, although a good practice, would remove the warning.

For the sake of correctness, I'd do the following:

function getParameter($param, $defaultValue) {
    if (array_key_exists($param, $_GET)) {
        $value=$_GET[$param];
        return isSet($value)?$value:$defaultValue;
    }
    return $defaultValue;
}

This way, I check the _GET array for the key to exist without triggering the Warning. It's not a good idea to disable the warnings because a lot of times they are at least interesting to take a look.

To use the function you just do:

$myvar = getParameter("getparamer", "defaultValue")

so if the parameter exists, you get the value, and if it doesnt, you get the defaultValue.

0
0

You should check wheter the index exists before use it (compare it)

if (isset($_GET['s']) AND $_GET['s'] == 'foobar') {
    echo "foo";
}

Use E_ALL | E_STRICT while developing!

0

Avoid if, else and elseifs!

$loadMethod = "";
if(isset($_GET['s'])){
    switch($_GET['s']){
        case 'jwshxnsyllabus':
            $loadMethod = "loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/jwshxnporsyllabus.xml', '../bibliographies/jwshxnbibliography_')";
        break;
        case 'aquinas':
            $loadMethod = "loadSyllabi('syllabus', '../syllabi/AquinasSyllabus.xml')";
        break;
        case 'POP2':
            $loadMethod = "loadSyllabi('POP2')";
    }
}

echo '<body onload="'.$loadMethod.'">';

clean, readable code is maintainable code

1
  • That is naive. Any good text editor have "Find matching bracket" but not a single one have "find ending for this case". Sure bad case is bad case block. But bad if is easier to get hang of. So ifs it is! (Yes I've seen both 3 000k LOC long Ifs and Switches. Will take Ifs any time) – przemo_li Mar 2 '16 at 9:00
0

I recommend you check your arrays before you blindly access them :

if(isset($_GET['s'])){
    if ($_GET['s'] == 'jwshxnsyllabus')
        /* your code here*/
}

Another (quick) fix is to disable the error reporting by writing this on the top of the script :

error_reporting(0);  

In your case, it is very probable that your other server had the error reporting configuration in php.ini set to 0 as default.
By calling the error_reporting with 0 as parameter, you are turning off all notices/warnings and errors. For more details check the php manual.

Remeber that this is a quick fix and it's highly recommended to avoid errors rather than ignore them.

5
  • 1
    This hides the actual problem but doesn't solve it. It's purely wrong. – erenon Oct 24 '11 at 14:07
  • 1
    @erenon: Can we please give it a rest? There is not an actual problem or error, but a notice. It doesn't impact the result. No fairy tales please. – mario Oct 24 '11 at 14:09
  • @mario True but the point is that it's good practice to handle these. – Rudi Visser Oct 24 '11 at 14:13
  • I for one appreciate this answer -- it helps me understand why I wasn't getting error notices before and it helps me write my code more properly. +1 from me – Jeff Oct 24 '11 at 16:10
  • I would apreciate that you read the fact that this answer helped the OP before blindly downvote the answer. Thanks! – gion_13 Mar 12 '14 at 15:33
0

Simple function, works with GET or POST. Plus you can assign a default value.

function GetPost($var,$default='') {
    return isset($_GET[$var]) ? $_GET[$var] : (isset($_POST[$var]) ? $_POST[$var] : $default);
}
0

Another option would be to suppress the PHP undefined index notice with the @ symbol in front of the GET variable like so:

$s = @$_GET['s'];

This will disable the notice. It is better to check if the variable has been set and act accordingly.

But this also works.

-2

The real answer to this is to put a @ At symbol before the variable which will suppress the error

@$_GET["field"]
@$_POST["field"]

It will work some slower, but will keep the code clean.

When something saves time for the programmer, and costs time for the website users (or requires more hardware), it depends on how much people will use it.

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