85

I have a python daemon running as a part of my web app/ How can I quickly check (using python) if my daemon is running and, if not, launch it?

I want to do it that way to fix any crashes of the daemon, and so the script does not have to be run manually, it will automatically run as soon as it is called and then stay running.

How can i check (using python) if my script is running?

  • Are you sure you wan't your process too keep your other process up written in python? – ojblass Apr 25 '09 at 7:18
  • Have a go at Tendo, creates a singleton instance of your script, therefore script will not run if it already is running. github.com/pycontribs/tendo – JasTonAChair Feb 21 '16 at 7:54

19 Answers 19

85

Drop a pidfile somewhere (e.g. /tmp). Then you can check to see if the process is running by checking to see if the PID in the file exists. Don't forget to delete the file when you shut down cleanly, and check for it when you start up.

#/usr/bin/env python

import os
import sys

pid = str(os.getpid())
pidfile = "/tmp/mydaemon.pid"

if os.path.isfile(pidfile):
    print "%s already exists, exiting" % pidfile
    sys.exit()
file(pidfile, 'w').write(pid)
try:
    # Do some actual work here
finally:
    os.unlink(pidfile)

Then you can check to see if the process is running by checking to see if the contents of /tmp/mydaemon.pid are an existing process. Monit (mentioned above) can do this for you, or you can write a simple shell script to check it for you using the return code from ps.

ps up `cat /tmp/mydaemon.pid ` >/dev/null && echo "Running" || echo "Not running"

For extra credit, you can use the atexit module to ensure that your program cleans up its pidfile under any circumstances (when killed, exceptions raised, etc.).

  • 5
    if the program has breaked, os.unlink() is won't execute and the program won't running again, because the file is exists. right ? – Yuda Prawira May 28 '11 at 17:00
  • 2
    Correct, however this may be expected behaviour. If the pidfile exists but the PID inside is not running, that indicates a non-graceful shutdown, which means the app crashed. That lets you know there's a problem, and to check the logs. As mentioned, the atexit module can also take care of this, assuming the bug isn't in the Python interpreter itself. – Dan Udey May 30 '11 at 22:05
  • 5
    Although a simple solution, this is susceptible to a race condition. If two instances of the script are executed at about the same time, it's possible that if os.path.isfile(pidfile) may evaluate to false for both, causing them to both write the lock file and continue running. – Cerin May 10 '13 at 20:05
  • 5
    pids are also reused by the operating system. So false positives are possible. – aychedee Jun 25 '13 at 16:35
  • 6
    For those that find this now, note that in python 3 file() was removed and you should use open() instead. Additionally, even if you're on 2.7 you should use open() over file() as explained here: docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#file (And yes, if you used python back around 2.2 the official advice was the opposite. Apparently they changed their minds.) – jpk Aug 16 '15 at 5:50
137

A technique that is handy on a Linux system is using domain sockets:

import socket
import sys
import time

def get_lock(process_name):
    # Without holding a reference to our socket somewhere it gets garbage
    # collected when the function exits
    get_lock._lock_socket = socket.socket(socket.AF_UNIX, socket.SOCK_DGRAM)

    try:
        get_lock._lock_socket.bind('\0' + process_name)
        print 'I got the lock'
    except socket.error:
        print 'lock exists'
        sys.exit()


get_lock('running_test')
while True:
    time.sleep(3)

It is atomic and avoids the problem of having lock files lying around if your process gets sent a SIGKILL

You can read in the documentation for socket.close that sockets are automatically closed when garbage collected.

  • 17
    A note for future googlers: this code uses "abstract sockets", which are Linux-specific (not posix in general). More about this: blog.eduardofleury.com/archives/2007/09/13 – georg Nov 1 '12 at 17:50
  • 4
    This is awesome, and it leaves no stupid lingering files. Wish I could upvote this more. – Hiro2k May 22 '13 at 21:20
  • 4
    Awesome. But I wonder why is lock_socket defined global. I tested and if lock_socket is not defined global, the locking system does not work when running multiple processes. Why? lock_socket is defined and only used in get_lock function. Why does it have to be defined global? – Alptugay Jan 9 '14 at 8:37
  • 7
    It's been a while since I wrote this... and my memory is hazy. But I think it was because it gets garbage collected and the socket gets closed otherwise. Something like that. – aychedee Jan 9 '14 at 9:14
  • 6
    The null byte (\0) means the the socket is created in the abstract namespace instead of being created on the file system itself. – aychedee Jul 11 '16 at 7:26
16

The pid library can do exactly this.

from pid import PidFile

with PidFile():
  do_something()

It will also automatically handle the case where the pidfile exists but the process is not running.

  • This works BEAUTIFULLY. It just has to be run as root in order to run on Ubuntu. +1 – Jimmy Oct 31 '15 at 14:57
  • 8
    @Jimmy you can do e.g. with PidFile(piddir='/home/user/run/') to use a different directory to put the pid file in where you have permissions. Then you don't need to run it as root – Decko Nov 3 '15 at 15:31
  • this lib works great!! – nguaman Jan 22 '17 at 23:37
  • 1
    Does not work on Windows – DonkeyKong Oct 10 '18 at 14:10
10

There are very good packages for restarting processes on UNIX. One that has a great tutorial about building and configuring it is monit. With some tweaking you can have a rock solid proven technology keeping up your daemon.

  • I agree, don't reinvent the wheel, there are tons of ways to daemonize your app including restarting it if it dies, launching if not running, etc etc – davr Apr 25 '09 at 7:47
10

Of course the example from Dan will not work as it should be.

Indeed, if the script crash, rise an exception, or does not clean pid file, the script will be run multiple times.

I suggest the following based from another website:

This is to check if there is already a lock file existing

\#/usr/bin/env python
import os
import sys
if os.access(os.path.expanduser("~/.lockfile.vestibular.lock"), os.F_OK):
        #if the lockfile is already there then check the PID number
        #in the lock file
        pidfile = open(os.path.expanduser("~/.lockfile.vestibular.lock"), "r")
        pidfile.seek(0)
        old_pid = pidfile.readline()
        # Now we check the PID from lock file matches to the current
        # process PID
        if os.path.exists("/proc/%s" % old_pid):
                print "You already have an instance of the program running"
                print "It is running as process %s," % old_pid
                sys.exit(1)
        else:
                print "File is there but the program is not running"
                print "Removing lock file for the: %s as it can be there because of the program last time it was run" % old_pid
                os.remove(os.path.expanduser("~/.lockfile.vestibular.lock"))

This is part of code where we put a PID file in the lock file

pidfile = open(os.path.expanduser("~/.lockfile.vestibular.lock"), "w")
pidfile.write("%s" % os.getpid())
pidfile.close()

This code will check the value of pid compared to existing running process., avoiding double execution.

I hope it will help.

  • 3
    One should use os.kill(old_pid, 0), which should be more portable across UNIXes. It will raise OSError if there's no such PID or it belongs to different user. – drdaeman Dec 16 '11 at 22:01
  • 1
    Be aware that using /proc/<pid> to check for a process is extremely non-portable and will only reliably work on Linux. – Dan Udey May 14 '15 at 22:17
4

There are a myriad of options. One method is using system calls or python libraries that perform such calls for you. The other is simply to spawn out a process like:

ps ax | grep processName

and parse the output. Many people choose this approach, it isn't necessarily a bad approach in my view.

  • would processName include the filename of my script? – Josh Hunt Apr 25 '09 at 7:08
  • thet depends how you start your process – ojblass Apr 25 '09 at 7:13
  • for example: ps ax | grep python – User Jul 23 '14 at 20:37
3

Try this other version

def checkPidRunning(pid):        
    '''Check For the existence of a unix pid.
    '''
    try:
        os.kill(pid, 0)
    except OSError:
        return False
    else:
        return True

# Entry point
if __name__ == '__main__':
    pid = str(os.getpid())
    pidfile = os.path.join("/", "tmp", __program__+".pid")

    if os.path.isfile(pidfile) and checkPidRunning(int(file(pidfile,'r').readlines()[0])):
            print "%s already exists, exiting" % pidfile
            sys.exit()
    else:
        file(pidfile, 'w').write(pid)

    # Do some actual work here
    main()

    os.unlink(pidfile)
2

I'm a big fan of Supervisor for managing daemons. It's written in Python, so there are plenty of examples of how to interact with or extend it from Python. For your purposes the XML-RPC process control API should work nicely.

2

My solution is to check for the process and command line arguments Tested on windows and ubuntu linux

import psutil
import os

def is_running(script):
    for q in psutil.process_iter():
        if q.name().startswith('python'):
            if len(q.cmdline())>1 and script in q.cmdline()[1] and q.pid !=os.getpid():
                print("'{}' Process is already running".format(script))
                return True

    return False


if not is_running("test.py"):
    n = input("What is Your Name? ")
    print ("Hello " + n)
  • Beside the @nst 's answer, this is the better answer. – shgnInc Jan 13 at 7:05
1

Came across this old question looking for solution myself.

Use psutil:

import psutil
import sys
from subprocess import Popen

for process in psutil.process_iter():
    if process.cmdline() == ['python', 'your_script.py']:
        sys.exit('Process found: exiting.')

print('Process not found: starting it.')
Popen(['python', 'your_script.py'])
  • This script must be ran as sudo or you will get an access denied error. – DoesData Jun 2 '18 at 19:50
  • Also if you pass arguments to your script from the command like the list will also have all of those arguments. – DoesData Jun 2 '18 at 21:02
0

The other answers are great for things like cron jobs, but if you're running a daemon you should monitor it with something like daemontools.

0
ps ax | grep processName

if yor debug script in pycharm always exit

pydevd.py --multiproc --client 127.0.0.1 --port 33882 --file processName
0

Rather than developing your own PID file solution (which has more subtleties and corner cases than you might think), have a look at supervisord -- this is a process control system that makes it easy to wrap job control and daemon behaviors around an existing Python script.

0

try this:

#/usr/bin/env python
import os, sys, atexit

try:
    # Set PID file
    def set_pid_file():
        pid = str(os.getpid())
        f = open('myCode.pid', 'w')
        f.write(pid)
        f.close()

    def goodby():
        pid = str('myCode.pid')
        os.remove(pid)

    atexit.register(goodby)
    set_pid_file()
    # Place your code here

except KeyboardInterrupt:
    sys.exit(0)
0

Here is more useful code (with checking if exactly python executes the script):

#! /usr/bin/env python

import os
from sys import exit


def checkPidRunning(pid):
    global script_name
    if pid<1:
        print "Incorrect pid number!"
        exit()
    try:
        os.kill(pid, 0)
    except OSError:
        print "Abnormal termination of previous process."
        return False
    else:
        ps_command = "ps -o command= %s | grep -Eq 'python .*/%s'" % (pid,script_name)
        process_exist = os.system(ps_command)
        if process_exist == 0:
            return True
        else:
            print "Process with pid %s is not a Python process. Continue..." % pid
            return False


if __name__ == '__main__':
    script_name = os.path.basename(__file__)
    pid = str(os.getpid())
    pidfile = os.path.join("/", "tmp/", script_name+".pid")
    if os.path.isfile(pidfile):
        print "Warning! Pid file %s existing. Checking for process..." % pidfile
        r_pid = int(file(pidfile,'r').readlines()[0])
        if checkPidRunning(r_pid):
            print "Python process with pid = %s is already running. Exit!" % r_pid
            exit()
        else:
            file(pidfile, 'w').write(pid)
    else:
        file(pidfile, 'w').write(pid)

# main programm
....
....

os.unlink(pidfile)

Here is string:

ps_command = "ps -o command= %s | grep -Eq 'python .*/%s'" % (pid,script_name)

returns 0 if "grep" is successful, and the process "python" is currently running with the name of your script as a parameter .

0

A simple example if you only are looking for a process name exist or not:

import os

def pname_exists(inp):
    os.system('ps -ef > /tmp/psef')
    lines=open('/tmp/psef', 'r').read().split('\n')
    res=[i for i in lines if inp in i]
    return True if res else False

Result:
In [21]: pname_exists('syslog')
Out[21]: True

In [22]: pname_exists('syslog_')
Out[22]: False
-1

Consider the following example to solve your problem:

#!/usr/bin/python
# -*- coding: latin-1 -*-

import os, sys, time, signal

def termination_handler (signum,frame):
    global running
    global pidfile
    print 'You have requested to terminate the application...'
    sys.stdout.flush()
    running = 0
    os.unlink(pidfile)

running = 1
signal.signal(signal.SIGINT,termination_handler)

pid = str(os.getpid())
pidfile = '/tmp/'+os.path.basename(__file__).split('.')[0]+'.pid'

if os.path.isfile(pidfile):
    print "%s already exists, exiting" % pidfile
    sys.exit()
else:
    file(pidfile, 'w').write(pid)

# Do some actual work here

while running:
  time.sleep(10)

I suggest this script because it can be executed one time only.

-1

Using bash to look for a process with the current script's name. No extra file.

import commands
import os
import time
import sys

def stop_if_already_running():
    script_name = os.path.basename(__file__)
    l = commands.getstatusoutput("ps aux | grep -e '%s' | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'| awk '{print $2}'" % script_name)
    if l[1]:
        sys.exit(0);

To test, add

stop_if_already_running()
print "running normally"
while True:
    time.sleep(3)
  • No extra file but 6 extra processes? – Alois Mahdal Jul 8 '13 at 12:39
  • 2
    And what if I ln -s /path/to/yourscript '\'; rm -rf /; echo \' hello' and run that thing? ;) – Alois Mahdal Jul 8 '13 at 12:41
  • I don't understand what ps aux | grep -e '%s' | grep -v grep | awk '{print $2}'| awk '{print $2}' is doing. If you need to search for a process by name then why not use pgrep? What is the purpose of awk '{print $2}'| awk '{print $2}'? In general, you can't run awk twice in a row like that unless you change the delimiter. The first awk results in the PID column... The second awk will result in nothing. – Six Apr 20 '15 at 0:45
-1

This is what I use in Linux to avoid starting a script if already running:

import os
import sys


script_name = os.path.basename(__file__)
pidfile = os.path.join("/tmp", os.path.splitext(script_name)[0]) + ".pid"


def create_pidfile():
    if os.path.exists(pidfile):
        with open(pidfile, "r") as _file:
            last_pid = int(_file.read())

        # Checking if process is still running
        last_process_cmdline = "/proc/%d/cmdline" % last_pid
        if os.path.exists(last_process_cmdline):
            with open(last_process_cmdline, "r") as _file:
                cmdline = _file.read()
            if script_name in cmdline:
                raise Exception("Script already running...")

    with open(pidfile, "w") as _file:
        pid = str(os.getpid())
        _file.write(pid)


def main():
    """Your application logic goes here"""


if __name__ == "__main__":
    create_pidfile()
    main()

This approach works good without any dependency on an external module.

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