38

In order to better understand how things works in Java, I'd like to know if I can dynamically add, at runtime, a directory to the class path.

For example, if I launch a .jar using "java -jar mycp.jar" and output the java.class.path property, I may get:

java.class.path: '.:/Library/Java/Extensions:/System/Library/Java/Extensions:/usr/lib/java'

Now can I modify this class path at runtime to add another directory? (for example before making the first call to a class using a .jar located in that directory I want to add).

3 Answers 3

51

You can use the following method:

URLClassLoader.addURL(URL url)

But you'll need to do this with reflection since the method is protected:

public static void addPath(String s) throws Exception {
    File f = new File(s);
    URL u = f.toURL();
    URLClassLoader urlClassLoader = (URLClassLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
    Class urlClass = URLClassLoader.class;
    Method method = urlClass.getDeclaredMethod("addURL", new Class[]{URL.class});
    method.setAccessible(true);
    method.invoke(urlClassLoader, new Object[]{u});
}

See the Java Trail on Reflection. Especially the section Drawbacks of Reflection

3
  • this is not working form me.. i am not able to load class after this using Class.forName("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver"); Commented Apr 21, 2017 at 11:08
  • There is a reason why addURL is not public OR private. This is a unnecessary brutal force method that shouldn't be used in production code. Java designers provided more than one way of doing what's needed.
    – Kashyap
    Commented May 10, 2019 at 14:23
  • 4
    seems like the cast to URLClassLoader is broken in Java 9 (community.oracle.com/thread/4011800 and others)
    – Maikefer
    Commented Mar 11, 2020 at 9:58
26

Update 2014: this is the code from the accepted answer, by Jonathan Spooner from 2011, slightly rewritten to have Eclipse's validators no longer create warnings (deprecation, rawtypes)

//need to do add path to Classpath with reflection since the URLClassLoader.addURL(URL url) method is protected:
public static void addPath(String s) throws Exception {
    File f = new File(s);
    URI u = f.toURI();
    URLClassLoader urlClassLoader = (URLClassLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
    Class<URLClassLoader> urlClass = URLClassLoader.class;
    Method method = urlClass.getDeclaredMethod("addURL", new Class[]{URL.class});
    method.setAccessible(true);
    method.invoke(urlClassLoader, new Object[]{u.toURL()});
}
2
  • 5
    It would have been more stackoverflowish to edit the accepted answer, I think. No more duplicate answers, that's what we like at this site.
    – Zeemee
    Commented Dec 2, 2015 at 9:48
  • 2
    @Zeemee I hardly remember, maybe I thought this was an edge case. I simply decided to avoid the accepted answer too much; I did not want to go beyond author's intention.
    – knb
    Commented Dec 2, 2015 at 13:51
12

Yes, you can use URLClassLoader.. see example here. Doesn't use reflection.

-- edit --

Copying example from the link as suggested.

import java.net.MalformedURLException;
import java.net.URL;
import java.net.URLClassLoader;
import java.util.Hashtable;
import javax.naming.*;

public class ChangeLoader {
  public static void main(String[] args) throws MalformedURLException {
    if (args.length != 1) {
      System.err.println("usage: java ChangeLoader extra_classpath_url");
      System.exit(-1);
    }

    String url = args[0];
    // Save class loader so that we can restore later
    ClassLoader prevCl = Thread.currentThread().getContextClassLoader();

    // Use prevCl as parent, so we extend instead of replace
    ClassLoader urlCl = 
          URLClassLoader.newInstance(new URL[] {new URL(url)}, prevCl);

    try {
      Thread.currentThread().setContextClassLoader(urlCl);
      Context ctx = new InitialContext();
      System.out.println(ctx.lookup("tutorial/report.txt"));
      ctx.close();
    } catch (NamingException e) {
      e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
      // Restore old loader
      Thread.currentThread().setContextClassLoader(prevCl);
    }
  } // main()
}
5
  • The example there are good and they avoid using reflection. But maybe you can copy them here - in case the link gets broken? Commented Oct 23, 2015 at 12:18
  • 3
    It is great that this avoids reflection but it comes at a price: You are not adding a path to your process classpath but creating a new class loader which includes the new path and use it within a concrete thread, in this case, your current thread. That means that any path added this way will be only noted on those thread with explicitly modified class loaders. Commented Apr 7, 2016 at 6:31
  • 1
    @PabloFranciscoPérezHidalgo which is, of course, the way it should be used - you're meant to nest your classloaders so they have a defined scope (what you do in application servers, osgi etc), not mutate your system classloader.
    – eis
    Commented Sep 7, 2017 at 5:29
  • @eis Sure, but the OP was curious as to whether it was possible to add paths to the current process classpath. Commented Sep 7, 2017 at 6:54
  • @PabloFranciscoPérezHidalgo I don't think that's what OP intended. Anyway, I don't quite agree with the brut force method of reflection especially when it's not needed because Java folks provided ways to do it.
    – Kashyap
    Commented May 10, 2019 at 14:27

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