153

How do you split a string into an array in JavaScript by Uppercase character?

So I wish to split:

'ThisIsTheStringToSplit'

into

['This', 'Is', 'The', 'String', 'To', 'Split']
1

7 Answers 7

321

I would do this with .match() like this:

'ThisIsTheStringToSplit'.match(/[A-Z][a-z]+/g);

it will make an array like this:

['This', 'Is', 'The', 'String', 'To', 'Split']

edit: since the string.split() method also supports regex it can be achieved like this

'ThisIsTheStringToSplit'.split(/(?=[A-Z])/); // positive lookahead to keep the capital letters

that will also solve the problem from the comment:

"thisIsATrickyOne".split(/(?=[A-Z])/);
2
  • 63
    This will not find single uppercase characters. I suggest the following: "thisIsATrickyOne".match(/([A-Z]?[^A-Z]*)/g).slice(0,-1)
    – andrewmu
    Oct 25, 2011 at 11:25
  • 4
    Back into a readable string "thisIsATrickyOne".match(/([A-Z]?[^A-Z]*)/g).slice(0,-1).join(" ") gives this Is A Tricky One Jun 2, 2021 at 0:14
38
.match(/[A-Z][a-z]+|[0-9]+/g).join(" ")

This should handle the numbers as well.. the join at the end results in concatenating all the array items to a sentence if that's what you looking for

'ThisIsTheStringToSplit'.match(/[A-Z][a-z]+|[0-9]+/g).join(" ")

Output

"This Is The String To Split"
1
  • 1
    This is perfect. But anyone using this should be careful in the following case: 'ThisIs8TheSt3ringToSplit'.match(/[A-Z][a-z]+|[0-9]+/g).join(" ") will output This Is 8 The St 3 To Split, ommitting the small case string(ring) after 3.
    – Diablo
    Jul 19, 2019 at 9:32
12

Here you are :)

var arr = UpperCaseArray("ThisIsTheStringToSplit");

function UpperCaseArray(input) {
    var result = input.replace(/([A-Z]+)/g, ",$1").replace(/^,/, "");
    return result.split(",");
}
0
9

This is my solution which is fast, cross-platform, not encoding dependent, and can be written in any language easily without dependencies.

var s1 = "ThisЭтотΨόυτÜimunəՕրինակPříkladדוגמאΠαράδειγμαÉlda";
s2 = s1.toLowerCase();
result="";
for(i=0; i<s1.length; i++)
{
 if(s1[i]!==s2[i]) result = result +' ' +s1[i];
 else result = result + s2[i];
}
result.split(' ');
1
  • That's a good approach, comparing the individual strings after lowercasing
    – Drenai
    Apr 27, 2021 at 21:56
3

Here's an answer that handles numbers, fully lowercase parts, and multiple uppercase letters after eachother as well:

const wordRegex = /[A-Z]?[a-z]+|[0-9]+|[A-Z]+(?![a-z])/g;
const string = 'thisIsTHEString1234toSplit';
const result = string.match(wordRegex);

console.log(result)

0

I'm a newbie in programming and this was my way to solve it, using just basics of JavaScript declaring variables as clean for someone reading as possible, please don't kill me if it is not optimized at all, just starting with coding hehe :)

  function solution(string) {

     let newStr = '';

     for( i = 0; i < string.length ; i++ ) {
       const strOriginal = string[i];
       const strUpperCase = string[i].toUpperCase();

       if( strOriginal === strUpperCase) {
         newStr = newStr + ' ' + strOriginal;
       } else {
         newStr = newStr + strOriginal;
       }

     }

     return console.log(newStr);

   }


   solution('camelCasing');
0
string DemoStirng = "ThisIsTheStringToSplit";
            for (int i = 0; i < DemoStirng.Length; i++) {
                if (i != 0)
                {
                    if ((int)DemoStirng[i] <= 90 && (int)DemoStirng[i] >= 65)
                    {
                        var aStringBuilder = new StringBuilder(DemoStirng);
                        aStringBuilder.Insert(i, ",");
                        DemoStirng = aStringBuilder.ToString();
                        i++;
                    }
                }
            }
            string[] words = DemoStirng.Split(',');
1
  • 1
    This question is tagged javascript but this answer is not in javascript. Nov 4, 2022 at 4:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.