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Hello and good day to you.

I have a GPL/LGPL-related question.

Let's say that I made a derived work based on GPL-licensed or LGPL-licensed software (not much of a difference - derived work means I made change to source code and have to release source code to public), and decided to sell it as commercial application (or as a part of commercial application - in case of LGPL).

Am I allowed to grant access to source code (which includes all standard GPL rights to modify/redistribute) ONLY to people that actually got the software directly from me, and refuse to give source code to everybody else?. (If a somebody got software got it from somewhere else, I would tell him/her to contact the person he got software from). Such approach would make a lot of sense. However, I'm not sure if this is actually allowed by GPL.

Illustration:
I sell software. A person "A" purchases software from me and asks for source. I provide source code to "A". A person "B" gets a copy from "A", and asks me for a source code. I refuse to give him source code, and tell him that he should contact "A" regarding that matter. This is clearly not a proprietary license. Is it allowed or not?

What do you think?

closed as off-topic by Kevin Brown, CRABOLO, cpburnz, skyline75489, PSL Jun 5 '15 at 3:09

  • This question does not appear to be about programming within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • "Such approach would make a lot of sense." - Sure, if you live in the 19th century and thus can't host anything, or if you want to make peoples' lives needlessly complicated. What's wrong with throwing the source code on any of the numerous source code hosting platforms? – user395760 Oct 25 '11 at 13:37
  • @delnan: You did not understand the question. I'd advise to reread it. – SigTerm Oct 25 '11 at 14:02
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    I read the question two times before commenting and read it a third time just now. I may still be missing something, but all I see is "I don't want to give the GPL's source to people who got the software from anyone else". In my opinion, that's a questionable attitude (making it availabe has about zero cost given free open source VCS hosting, putting second-hand users off when they want the source code has no benefit - that's what I assume, at least, maybe my premise is faulty?), thus I'm snarking. – user395760 Oct 25 '11 at 14:07
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    I've never assumed you intend to use a proprietary license. Consider: Giving out copies of the source does not equal giving support and accepting (read: keeping tabs on and maybe executing) feature requests etc. - but by the way, isn't people asking for support the best way to make money off open source software? At least that works for Redhat et al. And anyway, as soon as it's copyleft the software might as well be free - as you note, it takes just one client playing saint, so I wouldn't expect a penny from people to use the software in the first place. But it's your decision. – user395760 Oct 25 '11 at 14:29
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is about licensing or legal issues, not programming or software development. See here for details, and the help center for more. – Kevin Brown Jun 4 '15 at 23:53
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I am a software developer and not a lawyer, so don't expect specific legal help:

Am I allowed to grant access to source code (which includes all standard GPL rights to modify/redistribute) ONLY to people that actually got the software directly from me, and refuse to give source code to everybody else?. (If a somebody got software got it from somewhere else, I would tell him/her to contact the person he got software from). Such approach would make a lot of sense. However, I'm not sure if this is actually allowed by GPL.

If you distribute your software under GPL to someone else (Person A), you give that person the right to get the source-code as well. The easiest way is to give the source-code with the work together. Then you have satisfied that requirement. Person A got the source already from you with the program. Job done.

If now Person C comes to you and tells you that she had heard that Person A has a software under GPL from you and now Person C wants the source-code, then you can tell person C that you didn't distribute the program to her so there is no obligation for you to give her the program at all. What's true for the program is true for the source as well (unless you've given the written statement to provide sources to any third-party).

The GPL does not disallow this. You only need to provide the source to the person you have been distributing the software to (unless you've given the written statement to provide sources to any third-party). And if you already passed the source once, you don't have to do it again. Would be nice, but there is no requirement. And yeah it would be nice as well to give your software to others, too, but there is no need (unless you've given the written statement to provide sources to any third-party).

You decide on your own to whom you distribute the software and the source to. The license does not force you to distribute the software at all or to everybody that runs across (unless you've given the written statement to provide sources to any third-party).

Edit:

I think, you might want to take a look into the GPL FAQ, here is a selection of questions that might be helpful:

and so on.

  • Aha. Now that makes sense, thank you. Of course I'll still need to ask a lawyer if I ever decide to use that model in practice. – SigTerm Oct 28 '11 at 15:43
  • Just read the GPL text and browse the FSF website. It's all pretty much explained. I don't think your "model" is explicitly special. It's just a standard distribution of software under GPL that you do. For example if someone buys an android phone, he get's the right to obtain the sources of the device GPL software from the vendor. – hakre Oct 28 '11 at 16:58
  • in certain scenarios GPL asks developer to make sure that source code is available for download for 3 years. I guess this part confused me, and that was the reason for the question. – SigTerm Oct 28 '11 at 23:46
  • @SigTerm: Okay it was not clear to me that you wanted to make use of the written offer for sources. I updated the question, I think you should look for your questions inside the GPL FAQ. – hakre Oct 29 '11 at 11:24
  • @SigTerm: I made it now more clear in the answer, that I've you've given the written statement to provide sources to any third-party, you need to do that, sure. – hakre Oct 30 '11 at 13:39
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No. If your project contains code under GPL, your entire code must also be released under the GPL, and you must grant free access to the source to anyone.

The GPL was designed to prevent exactly what you are trying to do: reselling open-source code under a closed-source license. Even if you find a legal loophole which would allow what you want, it would still be against the spirit of the license, so ethically speaking, you'd still be wrong.

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    I'm sorry, but it looks like you didn't understand the question. The idea is to grant all rights GPL provides and provide source code access to everybody who purchased software directly from me, and refuse to grant source code access to anybody who didn't get it directly from me. I.e. if you got software from another person, you won't get source from me, but i'll be politely asked to request source code from that person. This does not make it proprietary, since anybody will still be able to release the whole thing for free to everybody - if they have nothing better to do. – SigTerm Oct 25 '11 at 14:01

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