Traits have been one of the biggest additions for PHP 5.4. I know the syntax and understand the idea behind traits, like horizontal code re-use for common stuff like logging, security, caching etc.

However, I still don't know how I would make use of traits in my projects.

Are there any open source projects that already use traits? Any good articles/reading material on how to structure architectures using traits?

closed as not constructive by meagar, hjpotter92, Tim Bish, Ben D, Sébastien Renauld Apr 23 '13 at 17:21

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  • 8
    Here's my opinion: a blog post on the subject that I wrote on the topic. TL;DR: Basically, I fear that while they are powerful and can be used for good, the majority of uses we'll see are going to be complete anti-patterns and cause far more pain than they solve... – ircmaxell Oct 25 '11 at 19:15
  • 1
    @ircmaxell thats a good read, thanks a lot! – Max Oct 25 '11 at 19:30
  • 85
    Stop closing this kind of questions. If people are asking, and they are getting so much attention it is because they are useful! – Savas Vedova Apr 13 '14 at 19:32
  • 21
    This question is constructive. – Mick Mar 15 '15 at 8:30
  • 3
    This question is very constructive. Not broad either. – Deji May 12 '16 at 14:33
up vote 74 down vote accepted

My personal opinion is that there is actually very little application for traits when writing clean code.

Instead of using traits to hack code into a class it is better to pass in the dependencies via the constructor or via setters:

class ClassName {
    protected $logger;

    public function __construct(LoggerInterface $logger) {
        $this->logger = $logger;
    }
    // or
    public function setLogger(LoggerInterface $logger) {
        $this->logger = $logger;
    }
}

The main reason why I find that better than using traits is that your code is much more flexible by removing the hard coupling to a trait. For example you could simply pass a different logger class now. This makes your code reusable and testable.

  • 4
    Using traits, you can also use another logger class right? Just edit the trait, and all classes that use the trait gets updated. Correct me if I'm wrong – rickchristie Oct 25 '11 at 17:01
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    @rickchristie Sure, you could do that. But you would need to edit the source code of the trait. So you would change it for every class using it, not just the particular one you want a different logger for. And what if you want to use the same class but with two different loggers? Or if you want to pass a mock-logger while testing? You can't, if you use traits, you can, if you use dependency injection. – NikiC Oct 25 '11 at 17:05
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    I can see your point, I´m also pondering whether traits are worth it or not. I mean, in modern frameworks like Symfony 2 you have dependency injection all over the place which seems superioir over traits in most of the cases. At the moment I see traits as not much more then "compiler assisted copy & paste". ;) – Max Oct 25 '11 at 18:44
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    At the moment I see traits as not much more then "compiler assisted copy & paste". ;): @Max: That's exactly what traits were designed to be, so that's completely correct. It makes it more "maintainable", since there's only one definition, but it's basically just c&p... – ircmaxell Oct 25 '11 at 19:32
  • 27
    NikiC's is missing the point: using a trait doesn't prevent using Dependency Injection. In this case, a trait would just let every class that implements logging not have to duplicate the setLogger() method and creation of the $logger property. The trait would provide them. setLogger() would type hint on LoggerInterface as the example does, so that any type of logger can be passed in. This idea is similar to Gordon's answer below (only it looks like he's type hinting on a Logger super class rather than a Logger interface). – Ethan Oct 6 '12 at 21:18

I guess one would have to look into languages that have Traits for some time now to learn the accepted Good/Best practices. My current opinion on Trait is that you should only use them for code that you would have to duplicate in other classes that share the same functionality.

Example for a Logger trait:

interface Logger
{
    public function log($message, $level);    
}

class DemoLogger implements Logger
{
    public function log($message, $level)
    {
        echo "Logged message: $message with level $level", PHP_EOL; 
    }
}

trait Loggable // implements Logger
{
    protected $logger;
    public function setLogger(Logger $logger)
    {
        $this->logger = $logger;
    }
    public function log($message, $level)
    {
        $this->logger->log($message, $level);
    }
}

class Foo implements Logger
{
    use Loggable;
}

And then you do (demo)

$foo = new Foo;
$foo->setLogger(new DemoLogger);
$foo->log('It works', 1);

I guess the important thing to consider when using traits is that they really are just pieces of code that get copied into the class. This can easily lead to conflicts, for instance, when you try to change visibility of methods, e.g.

trait T {
    protected function foo() {}
}
class A { 
    public function foo() {}
}
class B extends A
{
    use T;
}

The above will result in an error (demo). Likewise, any methods declared in the trait that are also already declared in the using class will not get copied into the class, e.g.

trait T {
    public function foo() {
    return 1;
}
}
class A { 
    use T;
    public function foo() {
    return 2;
}
}

$a = new A;
echo $a->foo();

will print 2 (demo). These are things you will want to avoid because they make errors hard to find. You will also want to avoid putting things into traits that operate on properties or methods of the class that uses it, e.g.

class A
{
    use T;
    protected $prop = 1;
    protected function getProp() {
        return $this->prop;
    }
}

trait T
{
    public function foo()
    {
        return $this->getProp();
    }
}

$a = new A;
echo $a->foo();

works (demo) but now the trait is intimately coupled to A and the whole idea of horizontal reuse is lost.

When you follow the Interface Segregation Principle you will have many small classes and interfaces. That makes Traits an ideal candidate for the things you mentioned, e.g. crosscutting concerns, but not to compose objects (in a structual sense). In our Logger example above, the trait is completely isolated. It has no dependencies on concrete classes.

We could use aggregation/composition (like shown elsewhere on this page) to achieve the same resulting class, but the drawback of using aggregation/composition is that we will have to add the proxy/delegator methods manually to each and every class then that should be able to log. Traits solve this nicely by allowing me to keep the boilerplate in one place and selectively apply it where needed.

Note: given that traits are a new concept in PHP, all opinion expressed above is subject to change. I've not have had much time to evaluate the concept myself yet. But I hope it is good enough to give you something to think about.

  • 36
    Thats an interesting use case: use an interface which defines the contract, use the trait in order to satisfy that contract. Good one. – Max Oct 25 '11 at 18:41
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    I like this kind of true programmers, who propose a real working examples with short desc for each. Thx – Arthur Kushman Oct 11 '12 at 7:11
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    What if someone use an abstract class instead? Replacing the interface and trait, one can create an abstract class. Also if interface is so necessary for the application, abstract class can also implement the interface and define the methods like trait did. So can you explain why we still need traits? – sumanchalki Jan 16 '13 at 14:31
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    @sumanchalki Abstract class follow the rules of Inheritance. What if you needed a class that implements Loggable and Cacheable? You'd need the class to extend AbstractLogger which needs to extend AbstractCache then. But that means all Loggables are Caches. That is a coupling you do not want. It limits reuse and messes up your inheritance graph. – Gordon Jan 16 '13 at 14:41
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    I think demo links are dead – Trix Mar 14 '16 at 6:47

:) I don't like to theorize and debate about what should be done with something. In this case traits. I'll show you what I find traits useful for and you can either learn from it, or ignore it.

Traits - they are great to apply strategies. Strategy design patterns, in short, are useful when you want the same data to be handled (filtered, sorted, etc) differently.

For example, you have a list of products that you want to filter out based on some criteria (brands, specs, whatever), or sorted by different means (price, label, whatever). You can create a sorting trait that contains different functions for different sorting types (numeric, string, date, etc). You can then use this trait not only in your product class (as given in the example), but also in other classes that need similar strategies (to apply a numeric sort to some data, etc).

Try it:

<?php
trait SortStrategy {
    private $sort_field = null;
    private function string_asc($item1, $item2) {
        return strnatcmp($item1[$this->sort_field], $item2[$this->sort_field]);
    }
    private function string_desc($item1, $item2) {
        return strnatcmp($item2[$this->sort_field], $item1[$this->sort_field]);
    }
    private function num_asc($item1, $item2) {
        if ($item1[$this->sort_field] == $item2[$this->sort_field]) return 0;
        return ($item1[$this->sort_field] < $item2[$this->sort_field] ? -1 : 1 );
    }
    private function num_desc($item1, $item2) {
        if ($item1[$this->sort_field] == $item2[$this->sort_field]) return 0;
        return ($item1[$this->sort_field] > $item2[$this->sort_field] ? -1 : 1 );
    }
    private function date_asc($item1, $item2) {
        $date1 = intval(str_replace('-', '', $item1[$this->sort_field]));
        $date2 = intval(str_replace('-', '', $item2[$this->sort_field]));
        if ($date1 == $date2) return 0;
        return ($date1 < $date2 ? -1 : 1 );
    }
    private function date_desc($item1, $item2) {
        $date1 = intval(str_replace('-', '', $item1[$this->sort_field]));
        $date2 = intval(str_replace('-', '', $item2[$this->sort_field]));
        if ($date1 == $date2) return 0;
        return ($date1 > $date2 ? -1 : 1 );
    }
}

class Product {
    public $data = array();

    use SortStrategy;

    public function get() {
        // do something to get the data, for this ex. I just included an array
        $this->data = array(
            101222 => array('label' => 'Awesome product', 'price' => 10.50, 'date_added' => '2012-02-01'),
            101232 => array('label' => 'Not so awesome product', 'price' => 5.20, 'date_added' => '2012-03-20'),
            101241 => array('label' => 'Pretty neat product', 'price' => 9.65, 'date_added' => '2012-04-15'),
            101256 => array('label' => 'Freakishly cool product', 'price' => 12.55, 'date_added' => '2012-01-11'),
            101219 => array('label' => 'Meh product', 'price' => 3.69, 'date_added' => '2012-06-11'),
        );
    }

    public function sort_by($by = 'price', $type = 'asc') {
        if (!preg_match('/^(asc|desc)$/', $type)) $type = 'asc';
        switch ($by) {
            case 'name':
                $this->sort_field = 'label';
                uasort($this->data, array('Product', 'string_'.$type));
            break;
            case 'date':
                $this->sort_field = 'date_added';
                uasort($this->data, array('Product', 'date_'.$type));
            break;
            default:
                $this->sort_field = 'price';
                uasort($this->data, array('Product', 'num_'.$type));
        }
    }
}

$product = new Product();
$product->get();
$product->sort_by('name');
echo '<pre>'.print_r($product->data, true).'</pre>';
?>

As a closing note, I think about traits like accessories (which I can use to alter my data). Similar methods and properties that can get cut out from my classes and be put into a single place, for easy maintenance, shorter and cleaner code.

  • 1
    While this keeps the public interface clean, the internal one may become really complex with this, especially if you extend this to other things, like colors for example. I think simple functions or static methods to better here. – Sebastian Mach Jan 14 '16 at 8:40
  • I like the term strategies. – Rannie Ollit Sep 17 at 2:59

I am excited for Traits because they solve a common issue when developing extensions for the Magento ecommerce platform. The problem occurs when extensions add functionality to a core class (like say the User model) by extending it. This is done by pointing the Zend autoloader (via a XML config file) to use the User model from the extension, and have that new model extend the core model. (example) But what if two extensions override the same model? You get a "race condition" and only one is loaded.

The solution right now is to edit the extensions so one extends the other's model override class in a chain, and then set the extension configuration to load them in the correct order so the inheritance chain works.

This system frequently causes errors, and when installing new extensions it's necessary to check for conflicts and edit extensions. This is a pain, and breaks the upgrade process.

I think using Traits would be a good way to accomplish the same thing without this annoying model override "race condition". Granted there could still be conflicts if multiple Traits implement methods with the same names, but I would imagine something like a simple namespace convention could solve this for the most part.

TL;DR I think Traits could be useful for creating extensions/modules/plugins for large PHP software packages like Magento.

You could have a trait for read-only object like this:

  trait ReadOnly{  
      protected $readonly = false;

      public function setReadonly($value){ $this->readonly = (bool)$value; }
      public function getReadonly($value){ return $this->readonly; }
  }

You could detect if that trait is used and determine wheter or not you should write that object in a database, file, etc.

  • So the class that would use this trait then would call if($this -> getReadonly($value)); but this would generate an error if you did not use this trait. Therefor this example is flawed. – Luceos May 23 '13 at 7:20
  • Well, you need to check if the trait is in use first. If the ReadOnly trait is defined on an object, you can then check if it is readonly or not. – Nico Jul 22 '13 at 19:19
  • I did a generic proof of concept for such a trait in gist.github.com/gooh/4960073 – Gordon Sep 4 '13 at 11:35
  • You should declare an interface for ReadOnly for that purpose – Michael Tsang Jan 19 '17 at 9:42

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