78

I'm trying to write a program that looks at a .CSV file (input.csv) and rewrites only the rows that begin with a certain element (corrected.csv), as listed in a text file (output.txt).

This is what my program looks like right now:

import csv

lines = []
with open('output.txt','r') as f:
    for line in f.readlines():
        lines.append(line[:-1])

with open('corrected.csv','w') as correct:
    writer = csv.writer(correct, dialect = 'excel')
    with open('input.csv', 'r') as mycsv:
        reader = csv.reader(mycsv)
        for row in reader:
            if row[0] not in lines:
                writer.writerow(row)

Unfortunately, I keep getting this error, and I have no clue what it's about.

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "C:\Python32\Sample Program\csvParser.py", line 12, in <module>
    for row in reader:
_csv.Error: line contains NULL byte

Credit to all the people here to even to get me to this point.

  • Just a guess but it sounds like your input.csv file contains a blank line (mebe at the end?). Try lookin in the csvParser.py file for that exception text. – Sam Axe Oct 25 '11 at 19:43
  • I actually just went through the input.csv file and got rid of any and all blank space... still no luck (same error). – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 19:50
  • To pinpoint the line number, I suggest you introduce a counter variable and increment it within the for row in reader loop. – codeape Oct 25 '11 at 19:50
  • I'm not sure how I'm supposed to do that when the program itself won't execute. I tried adding a counter and nothing different showed up, just the same traceback error. – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 19:54
  • 3
    Do you have a NULL byte in your .csv? open('input.csv').read().index('\0') will give you the offset of the first one if you do. – retracile Oct 25 '11 at 19:55

10 Answers 10

58

I've solved a similar problem with an easier solution:

import codecs
csvReader = csv.reader(codecs.open('file.csv', 'rU', 'utf-16'))

The key was using the codecs module to open the file with the UTF-16 encoding, there are a lot more of encodings, check the documentation.

  • 4
    I had this same problem with a CSV file created from LibreOffice, which had been originally opened from an Excel .xls file. For some reason, LibreOffice had saved the CSV file as UTF-16. You can tell by looking at the first 2 bytes of the file, if it's FF FE then it's a good indicator that it's UTF-16 – Tom Dalton Nov 1 '13 at 9:43
  • 4
    Note that if your file contains UTF-16 data that is outside of the ASCII range csv.reader() will not be able to handle it, and you'll get UnicodeEncodeErrors instead. – Martijn Pieters Sep 4 '14 at 9:30
  • 4
    This just caused a different error to be raised, UnicodeError: UTF-16 stream does not start with BOM – Cerin Sep 5 '17 at 21:13
  • In my case it was 'utf-16le'. – Paweł Szczur Jul 11 '18 at 12:51
63

I'm guessing you have a NUL byte in input.csv. You can test that with

if '\0' in open('input.csv').read():
    print "you have null bytes in your input file"
else:
    print "you don't"

if you do,

reader = csv.reader(x.replace('\0', '') for x in mycsv)

may get you around that. Or it may indicate you have utf16 or something 'interesting' in the .csv file.

  • 3
    +1 on finding NULL bytes in the file... unforetunately now my 'corrected.csv' file now reads in Japanese... – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 20:09
  • Sounds like your .csv isn't in ascii. I think further help is going to require a bit more information about your .csv's actual content. Have you tried opening it in a text editor like vim or notepad? Or running file input.csv to identify the file type? – retracile Oct 25 '11 at 20:14
  • I've opened it in Notepad and it looks fine. What should a csv look like? It reads the same as it does on Google Analytics, but with huge tabs between the data. – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 20:16
  • Damn... is there any way to replace the tabs with commas and have it work with the Python program? – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 20:21
  • 1
    If your csv is tab delimited you need to specify so: reader = csv.reader(mycsv, delimiter='\t'). I imaging that the csv reader is gobbling up your whole file looking for the commas and getting all the way to EOF. But you definitely have an encoding issue. You need to specify the encoding when opening the file. – Steven Rumbalski Oct 25 '11 at 20:26
9

You could just inline a generator to filter out the null values if you want to pretend they don't exist. Of course this is assuming the null bytes are not really part of the encoding and really are some kind of erroneous artifact or bug.

See the (line.replace('\0','') for line in f) below, also you'll want to probably open that file up using mode rb.

import csv

lines = []
with open('output.txt','r') as f:
    for line in f.readlines():
        lines.append(line[:-1])

with open('corrected.csv','w') as correct:
    writer = csv.writer(correct, dialect = 'excel')
    with open('input.csv', 'rb') as mycsv:
        reader = csv.reader( (line.replace('\0','') for line in mycsv) )
        for row in reader:
            if row[0] not in lines:
                writer.writerow(row)
7

This will tell you what line is the problem.

import csv

lines = []
with open('output.txt','r') as f:
    for line in f.readlines():
        lines.append(line[:-1])

with open('corrected.csv','w') as correct:
    writer = csv.writer(correct, dialect = 'excel')
    with open('input.csv', 'r') as mycsv:
        reader = csv.reader(mycsv)
        try:
            for i, row in enumerate(reader):
                if row[0] not in lines:
                   writer.writerow(row)
        except csv.Error:
            print('csv choked on line %s' % (i+1))
            raise

Perhaps this from daniweb would be helpful:

I'm getting this error when reading from a csv file: "Runtime Error! line contains NULL byte". Any idea about the root cause of this error?

...

Ok, I got it and thought I'd post the solution. Simply yet caused me grief... Used file was saved in a .xls format instead of a .csv Didn't catch this because the file name itself had the .csv extension while the type was still .xls

  • 1
    Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:\Python32\Sample Program\csvParser.py", line 17, in <module> print ('csv choked on line %s' % (i+1)) NameError: name 'i' is not defined – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 20:03
  • Ok. Then it's choking on the very first line. Run this and post what you see: print(open('input.csv', 'r').readlines()[0]) – Steven Rumbalski Oct 25 '11 at 20:08
  • Something funky... but it's running. ÿþ/ < That's all it would paste (it's mostly blocks and numbers) – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 20:10
  • 1
    Perhaps your csv isn't really a csv. See the second half of my answer. – Steven Rumbalski Oct 25 '11 at 20:12
  • Oh shoot that could completely be it, how might I go about fixing this? I saved it straight from Google Analytics too... – James Roseman Oct 25 '11 at 20:12
7

If you want to replace the nulls with something you can do this:

def fix_nulls(s):
    for line in s:
        yield line.replace('\0', ' ')

r = csv.reader(fix_nulls(open(...)))
  • 1
    Replacing null with a space won't be a good choice. Worked for me to replace with a empty string – Marcelo Assis Jun 7 '18 at 17:05
2

A tricky way:

If you develop under Lunux, you can use all the power of sed:

from subprocess import check_call, CalledProcessError

PATH_TO_FILE = '/home/user/some/path/to/file.csv'

try:
    check_call("sed -i -e 's|\\x0||g' {}".format(PATH_TO_FILE), shell=True)
except CalledProcessError as err:
    print(err)    

The most efficient solution for huge files.

Checked for Python3, Kubuntu

1

I've recently fixed this issue and in my instance it was a file that was compressed that I was trying to read. Check the file format first. Then check that the contents are what the extension refers to.

1

Turning my linux environment into a clean complete UTF-8 environment made the trick for me. Try the following in your command line:

export LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8
export LANG=en_US.UTF-8
export LANGUAGE=en_US.UTF-8
  • for me also changing to UTF-8 solved the problem. On windows I used Notepad++ to change the format from UTF16 to UTF8. I then opened the file with libreoffice calc, and cleared extra lines etc. – Yuval Harpaz Jun 11 '18 at 11:31
-1

pandas.read_csv now handles the different UTF encoding when reading/writing and therefore can deal directly with null bytes

data = pd.read_csv(file, encoding='utf-16')

see https://pandas.pydata.org/pandas-docs/stable/reference/api/pandas.read_csv.html

-1

I've removed NULL bytes and solved this problem using a one-liner command from terminal.

tr < file_with_nulls.csv -d '\000' > file_without_nulls.csv

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