11

I tested the performance of transferring data from a program to another over socket on a single computer, and the speed is 120MBytes/s, is it normal?

My server and client programs are both extremely simple.

And my computer is AMD Athlon X2 4000+, 4G DDR2 667 ram, with windows xp sp3.

My friend said it was slow, and should be faster. But I don't know how can I improve them, or is there any other libraries I can try to get a better speed?

UPDATE

The server and client programs were both on my own computer, a single computer. The network card will limit the speed or not?


Server.java

import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;

public class SimpleServer {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        ServerSocket server = new ServerSocket(6666);
        Socket socket = server.accept();
        OutputStream output = socket.getOutputStream();

        byte[] bytes = new byte[10 * 1024]; // 10K
        for (int i = 0; i < bytes.length; i++) { bytes[i] = 12; } // fill the bytes

        // send them again and again
        while (true) {
            output.write(bytes);
        }
    }
}

Client.java

public class SimpleClient {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Socket socket = new Socket("127.0.0.1", 6666);
        InputStream input = socket.getInputStream();
        long total = 0;
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        byte[] bytes = new byte[10240]; // 10K

        // read the data again and again
        while (true) {
            int read = input.read(bytes);
            total += read;
            long cost = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
            if (cost > 0 && System.currentTimeMillis() % 1000 == 0) {
                 System.out.println("Read " + total + " bytes, speed: " + (total / (1024.0*1024)) / (cost / 1000.0) + " MB/s");
            }
        }
    }

}
6
  • 2
    Might your internal interface that is used for the loopback be configured for a speed of 100MB/s (or ist it 100Mbit/s ?) at max? – Thomas Oct 26 '11 at 13:11
  • How to check and change this configuration on Windows? – Freewind Oct 26 '11 at 13:18
  • 2
    Shouldn't you be working with seconds instead of milliseconds, and then dividing your bytes by 1024*1024? You appear to be working with bytes and milliseconds, which is a bit odd and not accurate. Granted you get bytes / 1000, but that's an odd way of getting to KB/s. – Tim Lloyd Oct 26 '11 at 13:24
  • @chibacity, thank you for pointing this! – Freewind Oct 26 '11 at 13:31
  • 1
    @Freewind Dividing total by 1024*1024 will give you total megabytes, diving this value by seconds will give you megabytes\second. – Tim Lloyd Oct 26 '11 at 13:37
11

Can you give me the output of this program?

public class SimpleServer {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        ServerSocket server = new ServerSocket(6666);
        Socket socket = server.accept();
        OutputStream output = socket.getOutputStream();

        byte[] bytes = new byte[32*1024]; // 32K
        while (true) {
            output.write(bytes);
        }
    }
}
public class SimpleClient {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Socket socket = new Socket("127.0.0.1", 6666);
        InputStream input = socket.getInputStream();
        long total = 0;
        long start = System.currentTimeMillis();

        byte[] bytes = new byte[32*1024]; // 32K
        for(int i=1;;i++) {
            int read = input.read(bytes);
            if (read < 0) break;
            total += read;
            if (i % 500000 == 0) {
                long cost = System.currentTimeMillis() - start;
                System.out.printf("Read %,d bytes, speed: %,d MB/s%n", total, total/cost/1000);
            }
        }
    }
}

on my machine prints

Read 25,586,204,672 bytes, speed: 5,245 MB/s
Read 53,219,426,304 bytes, speed: 5,317 MB/s
Read 85,018,968,064 bytes, speed: 5,416 MB/s
Read 117,786,968,064 bytes, speed: 5,476 MB/s

Try sending 32K blocks many times (for at least 2 seconds) and you should get 400 MB/s or more. e.g. at least 10,000 times.

On a very fast machine you can get 1 GB/s on a single client. With multiple clients you might get 8 GB/s.

Here is an example

Making file transfer more efficient Java


If you have a 100 Mb card you can expect around 11 MB/s (bytes per second).

Similarly for 1 Gb ethernet youc an expect around 110 MB/s

For a 10 Gig-E ethernet you might get up to 1 GB/s however you might only get half this unles syour system is highly tuned.

20
  • I just tried your program in my computer, and the result is 160MB/s. Seems you have a super powerful computer!! – Freewind Oct 26 '11 at 13:45
  • Can you tell me the hardware of your computer :) – Freewind Oct 26 '11 at 13:47
  • The result of your program in my computer: Read 17,173,721,620 bytes, speed: 169 MB/s, Read 34,152,127,136 bytes, speed: 170 MB/s – Freewind Oct 26 '11 at 13:52
  • 2
    I am using an ASUS Maximus IV, i7 2700K at 4.6 GHz, 16 GB of 1600 MHz DDR3, OCZ Vertex 3 240GB SSD, with Centos 5.7. – Peter Lawrey Oct 26 '11 at 14:06
  • 1
    @Peter Is it not more likely to be memory bandwidth? – Tim Lloyd Oct 26 '11 at 16:42
10

You're only transferring 10k bytes to perform your test. There is overhead to a lot of what you're doing and such a small set of data may be getting skewed by this overhead. (e.g. creating sockets, allocating memory etc.) You should create and transfer a much larger set of data (dozens of MBs+) to get a more realistic idea of what's going on. Doing this will make the overhead a smaller, less significant part of the data transfer process.

You should also perform this test a number of times (> 10) and take the average because your computer will be under loads from services, network transfers etc. at different, random points in time and these loads will affect your transfer rate. With 10+ iterations you could also drop any run times that are unusually slow, such as > 2 standard deviations.

8
  • 2
    +1 for pointing out the small data sample used to analyze the test. Logging the run time inside the sampling loop is also skewing the test in random, unpredictable ways. – Perception Oct 26 '11 at 13:18
  • 3
    No, he isn't. The write is done in an infinite loop, as well as the read. – JB Nizet Oct 26 '11 at 13:20
  • @JB Is Paul referring to the chunk size? – Tim Lloyd Oct 26 '11 at 13:22
  • 1
    That's not how I read his answer. And since 10KB is larger than the typical packet size (and seems like a realistic chunk size), I don't see why it would be a problem for the test. – JB Nizet Oct 26 '11 at 13:28
  • 1
    @Paul I was trying to work out why you said the test data size was "tiny". It's blasting round in an infinite loop sending 10k chunks??? – Tim Lloyd Oct 26 '11 at 13:35
5

The network card will limit the speed or not?

You are using 127.0.0.1 - the local / loopback address. Traffic from / to that address doesn't pass through the network card.

This means that this is not a valid way to measure real network throughput. However, it is a reasonable measure of Java's ability to move data through the local network stack ... on your machine.


What would be interesting would be to compare the result you are getting with an equivalent client / server pair written in C or C++.

1

Testing bandwidth between two peers in the same host doesn't exercise the NIC or the network at all, it is all looped back. Your data is therefore basically meaningless. Try it between two computers.

0

WinXP doesn't support auto-window scaling and probably the send/receive buffer size of the socket is too low for throughput test.

More also FileInputStream (socket uses FileInputStream practically) has smaller char[] buffer on Windows than Linux in the native code. The read/write is done via auxiliary buffer on the stack and the large chunk you put is funneled through.

Using a large direct buffer (as large as the socket buffers) is your best bet for throughput.

0

Well, it is interesting, but this nio implementation was on par with the SimpleServer/SimpleClient provided above(and sometimes actually beat it) (Though this is only if run in single threaded mode which is more one to one anyways!!!)

Both SimpleServer/SimpleClient and the nio IntegTestLocalhostThroughput.java provided in this directory...

https://github.com/deanhiller/webpieces/tree/master/core/core-asyncserver/src/test/java/org/webpieces/nio/api/throughput

I just thought that was quite interesting that nio is basically just as fast but scales better than the old io stuff.

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