87

I am trying to create a table with an auto-incrementing primary key in Sqlite3. I am not sure if this is really possible, but I am hoping to only have to designate the other fields.

For example:

CREATE TABLE people (id integer primary key auto increment, first_name varchar(20), last_name varchar(20));

Then, when I add a value, I was hoping to only have to do:

INSERT INTO people
VALUES ("John", "Smith");

Is this even possible?

I am running sqlite3 under cygwin in Windows 7.

140

You get one for free, called ROWID. This is in every SQLite table whether you ask for it or not.

If you include a column of type INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, that column points at (is an alias for) the automatic ROWID column.

ROWID (by whatever name you call it) is assigned a value whenever you INSERT a row, as you would expect. If you explicitly assign a non-NULL value on INSERT, it will get that specified value instead of the auto-increment. If you explicitly assign a value of NULL on INSERT, it will get the next auto-increment value.

Also, you should try to avoid:

 INSERT INTO people VALUES ("John", "Smith");

and use

 INSERT INTO people (first_name, last_name) VALUES ("John", "Smith");

instead. The first version is very fragile — if you ever add, move, or delete columns in your table definition the INSERT will either fail or produce incorrect data (with the values in the wrong columns).

  • 43
    ROWID isn't quite the same as a true autoincrement as the SAME value may be generated more than once. For example, with an empty table, inserting 3 rows gives the 3rd row a ROWID of 3 as expected. However insert 2 rows, delete the last and insert another, gives the 3rd inserted row a ROWID of 2, just as the 2nd row had. There is therefore an obvious serious problem if tables reference ROWIDs in a table where deletes occur and where deletes or ROWID nulling are not also done in the related tables. – Nick Aug 15 '15 at 13:37
  • 7
    In case it is not obvious from answer, you can use ROWID in your select statement e.g. select rowid from people; – Colin D Mar 20 '17 at 15:37
43

Yes, this is possible. According to the SQLite FAQ:

A column declared INTEGER PRIMARY KEY will autoincrement.

  • 9
    The caveat, as mentioned by Uku, and also explained in the documentation, is that you need to pass in a NULL for the ID in order for this to work. – Matt Hulse Oct 26 '11 at 16:50
  • 16
    You only need to use a NULL if you leave out the list of columns to INSERT — never a good practice. If you specify the columns, you can simply leave out the auto-increment column and it will receive the next value. – Larry Lustig Oct 26 '11 at 16:55
13

As of today — June 2018


Here is what official SQLite documentation has to say on the subject (bold & italic are mine):

  1. The AUTOINCREMENT keyword imposes extra CPU, memory, disk space, and disk I/O overhead and should be avoided if not strictly needed. It is usually not needed.

  2. In SQLite, a column with type INTEGER PRIMARY KEY is an alias for the ROWID (except in WITHOUT ROWID tables) which is always a 64-bit signed integer.

  3. On an INSERT, if the ROWID or INTEGER PRIMARY KEY column is not explicitly given a value, then it will be filled automatically with an unused integer, usually one more than the largest ROWID currently in use. This is true regardless of whether or not the AUTOINCREMENT keyword is used.

  4. If the AUTOINCREMENT keyword appears after INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, that changes the automatic ROWID assignment algorithm to prevent the reuse of ROWIDs over the lifetime of the database. In other words, the purpose of AUTOINCREMENT is to prevent the reuse of ROWIDs from previously deleted rows.

9

Have you read this? How do I create an AUTOINCREMENT field.

INSERT INTO people
VALUES (NULL, "John", "Smith");
  • So what you are saying is that what I am trying to do is not possible, but I can kind of simulate. I need to use a null in the insert? – ewok Oct 26 '11 at 16:43
  • 1
    you needn't do anything but always be inserting NULL as the id, it just explains how sqlite does it internally. – Uku Loskit Oct 26 '11 at 16:44
  • 7
    The NULL on INSERT is only required if you don't specify the list of columns to INSERT (in which case, you need a number of values exactly matching the number of columns and must use NULL as a placeholder). But doing an INSERT without specifying the list of columns is never good practice. If you specify the list of columns, just leave out both the autoincrement column and the NULL value, and you'll get the result you expect. – Larry Lustig Oct 26 '11 at 16:57
3

One should not specify AUTOINCREMENT keyword near PRIMARY KEY. Example of creating autoincrement primary key and inserting:

$ sqlite3 ex1

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS room(room_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, name VARCHAR(25) NOT NULL, home_id VARCHAR(25) NOT NULL);

INSERT INTO room(name, home_id) VALUES ('test', 'home id test');

INSERT INTO room(name, home_id) VALUES ('test 2', 'home id test 2');

SELECT * FROM room;

will give:

1|test|home id test
2|test 2|home id test 2
2

SQLite AUTOINCREMENT is a keyword used for auto incrementing a value of a field in the table. We can auto increment a field value by using AUTOINCREMENT keyword when creating a table with specific column name to auto incrementing it.

The keyword AUTOINCREMENT can be used with INTEGER field only. Syntax:

The basic usage of AUTOINCREMENT keyword is as follows:

CREATE TABLE table_name( column1 INTEGER AUTOINCREMENT, column2 datatype, column3 datatype, ..... columnN datatype, );

For Example See Below: Consider COMPANY table to be created as follows:

sqlite> CREATE TABLE TB_COMPANY_INFO( ID INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT, NAME TEXT NOT NULL, AGE INT NOT NULL, ADDRESS CHAR(50), SALARY REAL );

Now, insert following records into table TB_COMPANY_INFO:

INSERT INTO TB_COMPANY_INFO (NAME,AGE,ADDRESS,SALARY) VALUES ( 'MANOJ KUMAR', 40, 'Meerut,UP,INDIA', 200000.00 );

Now Select the record SELECT *FROM TB_COMPANY_INFO ID NAME AGE ADDRESS SALARY 1 Manoj Kumar 40 Meerut,UP,INDIA 200000.00

2

Beside rowid, you can define your own auto increment field but it is not recommended. It is always be better solution when we use rowid that is automatically increased.

The AUTOINCREMENT keyword imposes extra CPU, memory, disk space, and disk I/O overhead and should be avoided if not strictly needed. It is usually not needed.

Read here for detailed information.

  • apparently rowid isn't always automatically increased, see the comment by Nick – rogerdpack Oct 3 '16 at 21:54
  • Not true. Auto increment is better in some respects, since it will not reuse IDs - a pretty important requirement for many systems. – O'Rooney Dec 11 '17 at 21:25
1

I know this answer is a bit late.
My purpose for this answer is for everyone's reference should they encounter this type of challenge with SQLite now or in the future and they're having a hard time with it.

Now, looking back at your query, it should be something like this.

CREATE TABLE people (id integer primary key autoincrement, first_name varchar(20), last_name varchar(20));

It works on my end. Like so,

enter image description here

Just in case you are working with SQLite, I suggest for you to check out DB Browser for SQLite. Works on different platforms as well.

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