1

I have some XML of the form:

<definitions devices="myDevice">
    <reg offset="0x0000" mnem="someRegister">
        <field mnem="someField" msb="31" lsb="24 />
        ...
    </reg>
    ...
</definitions>

I want the XML to be the definitive reference and use XSLT to transform it to HTML for documentation, .h for building (and maybe other forms too).

The HTML version is working fine and produces a table per register, with a row per field:

... (header boilerplate removed)
<xsl:for-each select="definitions/reg">
  <table>
    <tr>
      <th><xsl:value-of select="@offset"/></th>
      <th><xsl:value-of select="@mnem"/></th>
    </tr>
    <xsl:for-each select="field">
        <tr>
            <td><xsl:value-of select="@msb"/>..<xsl:value-of select="@lsb"/></td>
            <td><xsl:value-of select="@mnem"/></td>
        </tr>
    </xsl:for-each>
  </table>
</xsl:for-each>

Converting to a .h isn't going so well. I'm completely failing to generate the required spaces in the output:

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:template match="/">
<xsl:for-each select="definitions/reg">
#define <xsl:value-of select="translate(@mnem,'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz','ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ')"/>
    <xsl:text> </xsl:text>
    <xsl:value-of select="@offset"/>
</xsl:for-each>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

I'd hope for that to produce the output:

#define SOMEREGISTER 0x0000

But I actually get:

#define SOMEREGISTER0x0000

I don't understand why I get the space after the '#define', but not the one after the transformed mnemonic. I've tried a simpler solution with just an inline space, with the same results.

I'm too new to this (XSLT) to know whether I'm a) doing it wrong or b) finding a limitation in tDOM.

  • Made the tag for you. – Donal Fellows Oct 27 '11 at 14:43
  • We do not require a tag for every single library on the planet. – Charles Oct 27 '11 at 22:08
  • @Charles : Since this problem is specific to that library (a library which is quite well known in the Tcl world), surely it's quite reasonable to tag it as such? What is the harm in doing so? – Chris Oct 28 '11 at 8:45
  • @Chris, there seem to be only six other questions on SO mentioning the library. That's six more than I saw last night, I must have typoed something. I've retagged most of them with tdom (where the question is about tdom, as opposed to the answers). My "that tag does not need to exist" threshold is like 1 or 2 questions. I'm a new tag deletionist, after all. – Charles Oct 28 '11 at 18:59
2

Testing with this:

# I could have read these from a file I suppose...
set in {<definitions devices="myDevice">
<reg offset="0x0000" mnem="someRegister">
<field mnem="someField" msb="31" lsb="24" />
</reg>
</definitions>}
set ss {<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:template match="/">
<xsl:for-each select="definitions/reg">
<xsl:text>#define </xsl:text>
<xsl:value-of select="translate(@mnem,'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz','ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ')"/>
<xsl:text xml:space="preserve"> </xsl:text>
<xsl:value-of select="@offset"/>
</xsl:for-each>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>}

# Interesting code starts here
package require tdom
set indoc [dom parse $in]
set xslt [dom parse -keepEmpties $ss]
set outdoc [$indoc xslt $xslt]
puts [$outdoc asText]

I find that this works. The issue is that the tDOM parser doesn't handle the xml:space attribute correctly; without the magical -keepEmpties option, all the empty strings are stripped from the stylesheet and that leads to a wrong XSLT stylesheet being applied. But with the option, it appears to do the right thing.

Note that the XSLT engine itself is doing the right thing. It's the XML parser/DOM builder. (I think it's a bug; I'll look up where to report it.)

  • This is now issue #6. – Donal Fellows Oct 27 '11 at 15:12
  • Helpful as always Donal, thanks. The other answers did offer some useful suggestions that lead to workarounds, but this is the one that most directly addresses the original problem. – Chris Oct 27 '11 at 15:18
  • It's a good thing I decided to check that the XSLT document was correct; seeing that space had already gone by the time it was fed into the engine was an eye-opener and helped narrow down the real problem. :-) – Donal Fellows Oct 27 '11 at 15:24
0

Per: http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/xml/library/x-tipwhitesp/index.html

Try using the preserve space directive:

<?xml version="1.0"?>

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:template match="/">
<xsl:for-each select="definitions/reg">
    <xsl:text xml:space="preserve">#define </xsl:text>
    <xsl:value-of select="translate(@mnem,'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz','ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ')"/>
    <xsl:text xml:space="preserve"> </xsl:text>
    <xsl:value-of select="@offset"/>
</xsl:for-each>
</xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>
  • Right idea, wrong implementation. HTML entities don't mean anything to XSLT, but this question explains how to do it. Although the response from @G_H might be the more correct solution. – Chris Oct 26 '11 at 20:49
  • Apologies - the above comment was targeted at an answer that has now vanished (!?) (or been completely replaced?) – Chris Oct 26 '11 at 20:57
  • Yeah, someone advised using &nbsp;. I'm a bit sketchy on whitespace in XML and XSLT too, but I'm guessing when the XSLT gets interpreted, some "ignorable" whitespace is removed by certain processors. Using xml:space would fix that. The fact that both your input and the stylesheet are XML can be confusing. But if you don't specify an output method and the output isn't detected to be HTML, the default is XML. If you intend to output text, it's safer to say so. – G_H Oct 26 '11 at 21:09
  • &#160; is getting me the spaces that I want, without introducing an <xsl:text> that seems to break new lines (implied or literal). I was hoping to move on to specifying a width for the mnemonic column (equivalent to 'printf("#define %20s 0x%04x", mnem, offset)') but now wonder how practical that is going to be. – Chris Oct 26 '11 at 21:15
  • 1
    Incidentally, it might also depend on your engine. Even your original example worked for me with MSXML – FanOfTamago Oct 26 '11 at 21:18
0

You don't have an output method specified in your second stylesheet, so the default is gonna be XML. I'd advice you to use output method "text", then use <xsl:text> elements for any literal output. Check this example:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output method="text" />
    <xsl:template match="/">
        <xsl:for-each select="definitions/reg"><xsl:text>#define </xsl:text><xsl:value-of select="translate(@mnem,'abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz','ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ')"/><xsl:text> </xsl:text><xsl:value-of select="@offset"/><xsl:text>&#10;</xsl:text>
        </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

EDIT: by the way, that &#10; at the end is a character code. It's simply the decimal value of the ASCII code for a line feed. This makes sure you start a new line for the next reg entry. If you need the Windows/DOS convention (carriage return + line feed), use &#13;&#10; instead.

  • As soon as I introduce an <xsl:text> .. </xsl:text> anywhere, all output is on a single line (with or without the &#10;). Looking at the output with 'od -t x1' suggests the presence of a &#10; does nothing at all to the output stream. – Chris Oct 26 '11 at 21:11
  • Did you specify the output method "text"? I tried this in XMLSpy and it worked there. This might have something to do with the XSLT processor you're using. Maybe check known issues or deviations from spec? – G_H Oct 26 '11 at 21:14
  • I did have the output method specified. The processor (tdom) claims to be very compliant, but it probably deserves looking into more closely. – Chris Oct 26 '11 at 21:20
  • Sometimes it feels like every XSLT processor just seems to interpret the specification in its own unique way. Or maybe the spec leaves too much room for interpretation. If we chant Michael Kay's name together he'll probably appear with a true answer. – G_H Oct 26 '11 at 21:22

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