I am using matplotlib to make scatter plots. Each point on the scatter plot is associated with a named object. I would like to be able to see the name of an object when I hover my cursor over the point on the scatter plot associated with that object. In particular, it would be nice to be able to quickly see the names of the points that are outliers. The closest thing I have been able to find while searching here is the annotate command, but that appears to create a fixed label on the plot. Unfortunately, with the number of points that I have, the scatter plot would be unreadable if I labeled each point. Does anyone know of a way to create labels that only appear when the cursor hovers in the vicinity of that point?

  • 1
    People ending up here through search might also want to check this answer, which is rather complex, but might be suitable depending on the requirements. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Nov 7 '17 at 21:03
up vote 27 down vote accepted

It seems none of the other answers here actually answer the question. So here is a code that uses a scatter and shows an annotation upon hovering over the scatter points.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np; np.random.seed(1)

x = np.random.rand(15)
y = np.random.rand(15)
names = np.array(list("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO"))
c = np.random.randint(1,5,size=15)

norm = plt.Normalize(1,4)
cmap = plt.cm.RdYlGn

fig,ax = plt.subplots()
sc = plt.scatter(x,y,c=c, s=100, cmap=cmap, norm=norm)

annot = ax.annotate("", xy=(0,0), xytext=(20,20),textcoords="offset points",
                    bbox=dict(boxstyle="round", fc="w"),
                    arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle="->"))
annot.set_visible(False)

def update_annot(ind):

    pos = sc.get_offsets()[ind["ind"][0]]
    annot.xy = pos
    text = "{}, {}".format(" ".join(list(map(str,ind["ind"]))), 
                           " ".join([names[n] for n in ind["ind"]]))
    annot.set_text(text)
    annot.get_bbox_patch().set_facecolor(cmap(norm(c[ind["ind"][0]])))
    annot.get_bbox_patch().set_alpha(0.4)


def hover(event):
    vis = annot.get_visible()
    if event.inaxes == ax:
        cont, ind = sc.contains(event)
        if cont:
            update_annot(ind)
            annot.set_visible(True)
            fig.canvas.draw_idle()
        else:
            if vis:
                annot.set_visible(False)
                fig.canvas.draw_idle()

fig.canvas.mpl_connect("motion_notify_event", hover)

plt.show()

enter image description here

Because people suddenly also want to use this solution for a line plot instead of a scatter, the following would be the same solution for plot (which works slightly differently).

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np; np.random.seed(1)

x = np.sort(np.random.rand(15))
y = np.sort(np.random.rand(15))
names = np.array(list("ABCDEFGHIJKLMNO"))

norm = plt.Normalize(1,4)
cmap = plt.cm.RdYlGn

fig,ax = plt.subplots()
line, = plt.plot(x,y, marker="o")

annot = ax.annotate("", xy=(0,0), xytext=(-20,20),textcoords="offset points",
                    bbox=dict(boxstyle="round", fc="w"),
                    arrowprops=dict(arrowstyle="->"))
annot.set_visible(False)

def update_annot(ind):
    x,y = line.get_data()
    annot.xy = (x[ind["ind"][0]], y[ind["ind"][0]])
    text = "{}, {}".format(" ".join(list(map(str,ind["ind"]))), 
                           " ".join([names[n] for n in ind["ind"]]))
    annot.set_text(text)
    annot.get_bbox_patch().set_alpha(0.4)


def hover(event):
    vis = annot.get_visible()
    if event.inaxes == ax:
        cont, ind = line.contains(event)
        if cont:
            update_annot(ind)
            annot.set_visible(True)
            fig.canvas.draw_idle()
        else:
            if vis:
                annot.set_visible(False)
                fig.canvas.draw_idle()

fig.canvas.mpl_connect("motion_notify_event", hover)

plt.show()

In case someone is looking for a solution for bar plots, please refer to e.g. this answer.

  • Very nice! One note, I noticed that ind["ind"] is actually a list of indexes for all points under the curser. This means that the above code actually gives you access to all points at a given position, and not just the top most point. For instance, if you have two overlapping points the text could read 1 2, B C or even 1 2 3, B C D if you had 3 overlapping points. – Jvinniec Nov 14 '17 at 13:45
  • @Jvinniec Exactly, there is deliberately one such case in the above plot (the green and red dot at x ~ 0.4). If you hover it it'll display 0 8, A I, (see picture). – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Nov 14 '17 at 13:50
  • @ImportanceOfBeingErnest this is a great code, but when hovering and moving on a point it calls fig.canvas.draw_idle() many times (it even changes the cursor to idle). I solved it storing the previous index and checking if ind["ind"][0] == prev_ind. Then only update if you move from one point to another (update text), stop hovering (make the annotation invisible) or start hovering (make annotation visible). With this change it's way more clean and efficient. – Sembei Norimaki Dec 14 '17 at 15:02
  • @SembeiNorimaki To make this code more efficient, one would use blitting. However, this is not meant to be a full add-on code, but rather a solution to the question. As an answer to the question it should also be understandable to the many readers here. – ImportanceOfBeingErnest Dec 14 '17 at 15:08
  • Pardon, @ImportanceOfBeingErnest, you are right. Thank you. This is really good code. – Ursa Major Apr 10 at 1:36

I know it's an old question, but I kept on arriving here while looking for a solution to hover (not click on) a line.

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
plot = fig.add_subplot(111)

# create some curves
for i in range(4):
    plot.plot(
        [i*1,i*2,i*3,i*4],
        gid=i)

def on_plot_hover(event):
    for curve in plot.get_lines():
        if curve.contains(event)[0]:
            print "over %s" % curve.get_gid()

fig.canvas.mpl_connect('motion_notify_event', on_plot_hover)           
plt.show()
  • 7
    This should be the accepted answer, since the question asks for hover not click. – bluenote10 Jul 24 '16 at 10:06
  • 1
    Very useful +1ed. You probably need to 'debounce' this because the motion_notify_event will repeat for motion inside the curve area. Simply checking that the curve object is equal to the previous curve seems to work. – bvanlew Dec 5 '16 at 10:58
  • 5
    Hmm - this didn't work out-of-the-box for me (so few things do with matplotlib...) - does this work with ipython/jupyter notebooks? Does it also work when there are multiple subplots? What about on a bar-chart rather than a line-graph? – dwanderson Jan 24 '17 at 20:17
  • 6
    This prints the label into the console when hovering. What about making the label appear on the picture when hovering ? I understood that to be the question. – Nikana Reklawyks Feb 6 '17 at 19:14
  • 2
    It doesn't work in Jupyter not Spyder.. – Euler_Salter Sep 28 '17 at 11:36

From http://matplotlib.sourceforge.net/examples/event_handling/pick_event_demo.html :

from matplotlib.pyplot import figure, show
import numpy as npy
from numpy.random import rand


if 1: # picking on a scatter plot (matplotlib.collections.RegularPolyCollection)

    x, y, c, s = rand(4, 100)
    def onpick3(event):
        ind = event.ind
        print 'onpick3 scatter:', ind, npy.take(x, ind), npy.take(y, ind)

    fig = figure()
    ax1 = fig.add_subplot(111)
    col = ax1.scatter(x, y, 100*s, c, picker=True)
    #fig.savefig('pscoll.eps')
    fig.canvas.mpl_connect('pick_event', onpick3)

show()
  • This does just what I need, thank you! As a bonus, in order to get it implemented, I rewrote my program so that instead of creating two separate scatter plots in different colors on the same figure to represent two sets of data, I copied the example's method for assigning color to a point. This made my program a bit simpler to read, and less code. Now off to find a guide to converting a color to a number! – jdmcbr Oct 27 '11 at 1:09
  • 1
    This is for scatter plots. What about line plots? I tried to make it work on them but it does not. Is there a worksaround? – Sohaib Aug 28 '14 at 5:12
  • @Sohaib See my answer – texasflood Aug 1 '15 at 17:14
  • I have a question on this. When I scatter-plot my points like this: plt.scatter(X_reduced[y == i, 0], X_reduced[y == i, 1], c=c, label=target_name, picker=True) with a zip for i, c and target_name, is then the order of my indexes messed up? And I cant look up anymore to which datapoint it belongs? – Chris Nov 5 '15 at 13:01
  • This doesn't seem to work for jupyter 5 notebooks with ipython 5. Is there an easy way to fix that? The print statement should also use parens for compatibility with python 3 – nealmcb Apr 30 '17 at 3:15

A slight edit on an example provided in http://matplotlib.org/users/shell.html:

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax.set_title('click on points')

line, = ax.plot(np.random.rand(100), '-', picker=5)  # 5 points tolerance

def onpick(event):
    thisline = event.artist
    xdata = thisline.get_xdata()
    ydata = thisline.get_ydata()
    ind = event.ind
    print 'onpick points:', zip(xdata[ind], ydata[ind])

fig.canvas.mpl_connect('pick_event', onpick)

plt.show()

This plots a straight line plot, as Sohaib was asking

  • 1
    it doesn't work in Jupyter nor Spyder.. – Euler_Salter Sep 28 '17 at 11:36

mpld3 solve it for me. EDIT (CODE ADDED):

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import mpld3

fig, ax = plt.subplots(subplot_kw=dict(axisbg='#EEEEEE'))
N = 100

scatter = ax.scatter(np.random.normal(size=N),
                 np.random.normal(size=N),
                 c=np.random.random(size=N),
                 s=1000 * np.random.random(size=N),
                 alpha=0.3,
                 cmap=plt.cm.jet)
ax.grid(color='white', linestyle='solid')

ax.set_title("Scatter Plot (with tooltips!)", size=20)

labels = ['point {0}'.format(i + 1) for i in range(N)]
tooltip = mpld3.plugins.PointLabelTooltip(scatter, labels=labels)
mpld3.plugins.connect(fig, tooltip)

mpld3.show()

You can check this example

  • Please include sample code and do not just link to external sources with no context or information. See the Help Center for more information. – Joseph Farah Jun 9 '17 at 2:25
  • 3
    unfortunately mpld3 is no longer being actively maintained as of July 2017 – Ben Lindsay Jul 25 '17 at 2:27
  • Code sample fails with a TypeError: array([1.]) is not JSON serializable. – P-Gn Feb 16 at 9:31

mplcursors worked for me. mplcursors provides clickable annotation for matplotlib. It is heavily inspired from mpldatacursor (https://github.com/joferkington/mpldatacursor), with a much simplified API

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np
import mplcursors

data = np.outer(range(10), range(1, 5))

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
lines = ax.plot(data)
ax.set_title("Click somewhere on a line.\nRight-click to deselect.\n"
             "Annotations can be dragged.")

mplcursors.cursor(lines) # or just mplcursors.cursor()

plt.show()

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.