133

How do I convert an int, n, to a string so that when I send it over the serial, it is sent as a string?

This is what I have so far:

int ledPin=13;
int testerPin=8;
int n=1;

char buf[10];

void setup()
{
    pinMode(ledPin, OUTPUT);
    pinMode(testerPin, OUTPUT);
    Serial.begin(115200);
}

void loop()
{
    digitalWrite(ledPin, HIGH);
    sprintf(buf, "Hello!%d", n);
    Serial.println(buf);
    delay(500);
    digitalWrite(ledPin, LOW);
    delay(500);

    n++;
}
2

10 Answers 10

204

Use like this:

String myString = String(n);

You can find more examples here.

3
  • 7
    You do not need to use a String object, Serial.print or println already convert them ! Commented Oct 19, 2015 at 11:00
  • I'm looking for the way how to convert 97 into 'a' character or 65 into 'A' character. I mean ASCII number to character. I found this way doesn't work. Commented Jun 3, 2016 at 7:11
  • @OkiErieRinaldi: You can use - char bar = 97; it will work.
    – Cassio
    Commented Jun 5, 2016 at 7:53
34

use the itoa() function included in stdlib.h

char buffer[7];         //the ASCII of the integer will be stored in this char array
itoa(-31596,buffer,10); //(integer, yourBuffer, base)
26

You can simply do:

Serial.println(n);

which will convert n to an ASCII string automatically. See the documentation for Serial.println().

17

You just need to wrap it around a String object like this:

String numberString = String(n);

You can also do:

String stringOne = "Hello String";                     // using a constant String
String stringOne =  String('a');                       // converting a constant char into a String
String stringTwo =  String("This is a string");        // converting a constant string into a String object
String stringOne =  String(stringTwo + " with more");  // concatenating two strings
String stringOne =  String(13);                        // using a constant integer
String stringOne =  String(analogRead(0), DEC);        // using an int and a base
String stringOne =  String(45, HEX);                   // using an int and a base (hexadecimal)
String stringOne =  String(255, BIN);                  // using an int and a base (binary)
String stringOne =  String(millis(), DEC);             // using a long and a base
11

This is speed-optimized solution for converting int (signed 16-bit integer) into string.

This implementation avoids using division since 8-bit AVR used for Arduino has no hardware DIV instruction, the compiler translate division into time-consuming repetitive subtractions. Thus the fastest solution is using conditional branches to build the string.

A fixed 7 bytes buffer prepared from beginning in RAM to avoid dynamic allocation. Since it's only 7 bytes, the cost of fixed RAM usage is considered minimum. To assist compiler, we add register modifier into variable declaration to speed-up execution.

char _int2str[7];
char* int2str( register int i ) {
  register unsigned char L = 1;
  register char c;
  register boolean m = false;
  register char b;  // lower-byte of i
  // negative
  if ( i < 0 ) {
    _int2str[ 0 ] = '-';
    i = -i;
  }
  else L = 0;
  // ten-thousands
  if( i > 9999 ) {
    c = i < 20000 ? 1
      : i < 30000 ? 2
      : 3;
    _int2str[ L++ ] = c + 48;
    i -= c * 10000;
    m = true;
  }
  // thousands
  if( i > 999 ) {
    c = i < 5000
      ? ( i < 3000
          ? ( i < 2000 ? 1 : 2 )
          :   i < 4000 ? 3 : 4
        )
      : i < 8000
        ? ( i < 6000
            ? 5
            : i < 7000 ? 6 : 7
          )
        : i < 9000 ? 8 : 9;
    _int2str[ L++ ] = c + 48;
    i -= c * 1000;
    m = true;
  }
  else if( m ) _int2str[ L++ ] = '0';
  // hundreds
  if( i > 99 ) {
    c = i < 500
      ? ( i < 300
          ? ( i < 200 ? 1 : 2 )
          :   i < 400 ? 3 : 4
        )
      : i < 800
        ? ( i < 600
            ? 5
            : i < 700 ? 6 : 7
          )
        : i < 900 ? 8 : 9;
    _int2str[ L++ ] = c + 48;
    i -= c * 100;
    m = true;
  }
  else if( m ) _int2str[ L++ ] = '0';
  // decades (check on lower byte to optimize code)
  b = char( i );
  if( b > 9 ) {
    c = b < 50
      ? ( b < 30
          ? ( b < 20 ? 1 : 2 )
          :   b < 40 ? 3 : 4
        )
      : b < 80
        ? ( i < 60
            ? 5
            : i < 70 ? 6 : 7
          )
        : i < 90 ? 8 : 9;
    _int2str[ L++ ] = c + 48;
    b -= c * 10;
    m = true;
  }
  else if( m ) _int2str[ L++ ] = '0';
  // last digit
  _int2str[ L++ ] = b + 48;
  // null terminator
  _int2str[ L ] = 0;  
  return _int2str;
}

// Usage example:
int i = -12345;
char* s;
void setup() {
  s = int2str( i );
}
void loop() {}

This sketch is compiled to 1,082 bytes of code using avr-gcc which bundled with Arduino v1.0.5 (size of int2str function itself is 594 bytes). Compared with solution using String object which compiled into 2,398 bytes, this implementation can reduce your code size by 1.2 Kb (assumed that you need no other String's object method, and your number is strict to signed int type).

This function can be optimized further by writing it in proper assembler code.

2
  • 2
    An alternative approach to avoiding DIV is to multiply by (2^N/10) and then shift right by N bits. So for N=16, x/10 ~= (x*6554)>>16. Close enough for most digits, anyway. Commented Jan 2, 2014 at 22:46
  • 1
    This is... art.
    – ljleb
    Commented Apr 4, 2021 at 7:05
4

This simply work for me:

int bpm = 60;
char text[256];
sprintf(text, "Pulso: %d     ", bpm);
//now use text as string
3

In Arduino, using the String keyword creates an object of the String class which has multiple versions of its constructor. If an integer is passed as an argument while instantiating, it contains the ASCII representation of the numbers.

int num = 12;
String intString = String(num);
// The value of intString should be "12"

Please check out the arduino String reference.

2

The solution is much too big. Try this simple one. Please provide a 7+ character buffer, no check made.

char *i2str(int i, char *buf){
  byte l=0;
  if(i<0) buf[l++]='-';
  boolean leadingZ=true;
  for(int div=10000, mod=0; div>0; div/=10){
    mod=i%div;
    i/=div;
    if(!leadingZ || i!=0){
       leadingZ=false;
       buf[l++]=i+'0';
    }
    i=mod;
  }
  buf[l]=0;
  return buf;
}

Can be easily modified to give back end of buffer, if you discard index 'l' and increment the buffer directly.

0
0

Here below is a self composed myitoa() which is by far smaller in code, and reserves a FIXED array of 7 (including terminating 0) in char *mystring, which is often desirable. It is obvious that one can build the code with character-shift instead, if one need a variable-length output-string.

void myitoa(int number, char *mystring) {
  boolean negative = number>0;

  mystring[0] = number<0? '-' : '+';
  number = number<0 ? -number : number;
  for (int n=5; n>0; n--) {
     mystring[n] = ' ';
     if(number > 0) mystring[n] = number%10 + 48;
     number /= 10;
  }  
  mystring[6]=0;
}
0
Serial.println(val) 
Serial.println(val, format)

for more you can visit to the site of arduino https://www.arduino.cc/en/Serial/Println

wish this will help you. thanks!

1
  • This does not convert int to string.
    – Duloren
    Commented May 20, 2022 at 20:40

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