6

Gen 0: So I read that gen 0 triggers when gen 0 exceeds a size threshold. But I also read that GC is not performed at a "new", because "new" merely slides an address forward. Then, when does it check it has exceeded the threshold to trigger the gen 0 GC?

Gen 1/2: Do gen 1/2 have their own size threshold that trigger GC? When do they consider the threshold? Is it the moment when survivors are promoted to the gen?

Does that mean for a gen 1 GC to occur it first checks gen 0, then promotes them to gen 1, only to find gen 1 has exceeded the threshold and so it check gen 1, and check gen 0 again?

And does that mean for a gen 2 GC to occur it first checks gen 0, then promotes them to gen 1, only to find gen 1 has exceeded the threshold and so it checks gen 1, and check gen 0 again. Then promotes gen 0 to gen 1 and gen 1 to gen 2, only to find gen 2 has exceeded the threshold and so it checks gen 2, gen 1 again, and gen 0 again again?

4
  • 4
    All of these details are proprietary internal implementation details, vary from implementation to implementation, and are subject to change at any time. Also, the GC runs on its own thread, so thread scheduling is also a factor. If you could say why you care, that would help get you a better answer. If you care, for instance, because you want to know when you are in danger of an expensive collection happening at a bad time, there are ways you can find that out without knowing the internal details of the GC. Oct 27 '11 at 4:38
  • I care because I have to explain it to people who totally doesn't know GC and I found that I merely know the effect but I don't know the cause. I also don't know which are not implementation detail and which are such that I don't have to explain.
    – ill mg
    Oct 27 '11 at 5:09
  • 1
    If you care about when the GC kicks in, you are doing it wrong.
    – leppie
    Oct 27 '11 at 6:01
  • @EricLippert I care because I see lots of back-to-back gen 2 collections that fail to achieve anything, take up 99% CPU, and mysteriously start and stop. If I knew what started them, perhaps I could avoid doing that. Full question for anyone interested. Nov 21 '11 at 23:03
1

After the CLR initialized, objects which are first added to the managed heap are defined as Gen0. When the GC executed, the generation of the objects which were not collected will increase by 1 level and became Gen1. Objects created after that are still Gen0. With objects are created, Only if the memory released by the Gen0 objects is not enough to create new objects, and the volume in Gen1 exceeds the capacity, GC will collect both Gen0 and Gen1 objects. After that, objects not collected in Gen1 will become Gen2, and objects not collected in Gen0 will become Gen1. Objects created after that are still Gen0.

0

Gen 0 triggers when the VM is out of memory.
Gen 1 triggers when Gen 0 did not free enough memory and its still out of memory.
Gen n triggers when Gen n - 1 did not free enough memory and its still out of memory.
If it reaches the last Gen and it still didn't free enough memory, new memory is allocated.

2
  • Do you mean it is true that for a gen 2 GC to occur it first checks gen 0, then promotes them to gen 1, only to find gen 1 has exceeded the threshold and so it checks gen 1, and check gen 0 again. Then promotes gen 0 to gen 1 and gen 1 to gen 2, only to find gen 2 has exceeded the threshold and so it checks gen 2, gen 1 again, and gen 0 again again?
    – ill mg
    Oct 27 '11 at 4:37
  • Everything gets promoted after the memory is already fine and regardless whether a collection is successful. After going to gen 1 and the collection is not successful it will go to gen2, not back.
    – Dani
    Oct 27 '11 at 4:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.