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I have a script that attaches actions to some objects in my HTML code. Say, a textarea with a class of with-counter that updates the number of characters being typed on it; a list that listens when a mouseover happens; a link that is being ajaxified; and so on.

e.g.:

$("textarea.with-counter").keydown(function(){
   var text_len = $(this).val().length;
   //manipulate the span/etc that has the counter
});
$("a.ajax_link").click(function(){
   var loc = $(this).attr("href");
   //load the value of href via $.ajax to some div
   //yadda yadda
});

The initial scenario is this: A relatively small amount of HTML is loaded from the database and then actions are being attached to it (implementing the code snippet above). Now, I have this script that loads another chunk of same format HTML. The newly loaded HTML should receive the same actions.

The bottom line of the problem is: I don't want to attach these actions to the objects/elements that I have attached these actions before. As newer chunk of HTMLs are loaded, the slower this attaching of actions happen. The actions are being attached to the previously loaded HTML (remember that they have these actions) when what I want to happen is that the actions must be attached only to the newly loaded HTML chunks. There are times that FF freezes and will ask if I want to continue the script process.

Ergo, the question: Is there a way where I can opt to bypass attaching of actions to the elements that I have attached actions before?

*A million thanks, everyone.

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Simply use live events, e.g. $(...).live('eventname', function() { ... })

They are not attached to the elements itself but the document so thanks to event bubbling they work for all matching events including those that didn't exist at the time of the .live() call.

| improve this answer | |
  • I wonder how the performance of live events shapes up against using the context approach I mentioned, especially for large pages. Would be good to do a jsperf.com test. :-) – GregL Oct 27 '11 at 13:46
  • Based from the method name, does this continuously attach actions to the elements while the tab is open? Thanks. – threepoint1416 Oct 27 '11 at 13:56
  • Anyways, I actually implemented this method to what I'm building. But if the need arises, I'll deff en route to your answer @GregL. Thanksalot – threepoint1416 Oct 27 '11 at 14:27
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    The performance should be fine. Events bubble to the top of the document anyway so the only real difference is that you cannot use preventDefault() or stopPropagation() since the event has already bubbled up (it's handled when it reaches the document's root element). you could also use delegate() instead of live events. In this case you specify the root element you want to use. – ThiefMaster Oct 27 '11 at 14:50
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Yes, refactor your action-binding code into a function that takes in a context - a selector or element within which to search. Then change all your selectors to pass in the context as a second parameter to the jQuery $ function.

You could then call this function for a given new container element.

E.g.

function bindActions(context) {
    context = context || $('body'); // use whole page if no context specified
$("textarea.with-counter", context).keydown(function(){
   var text_len = $(this).val().length;
   //manipulate the span/etc that has the counter
});
$("a.ajax_link", context).click(function(){
   var loc = $(this).attr("href");
   //load the value of href via $.ajax to some div
   //yadda yadda
});
}

// add new content to a div with id of "new3", for example, then:
bindActions('#new3');
| improve this answer | |
  • I think this is what I'm exactly looking for. :) – threepoint1416 Oct 27 '11 at 13:54

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