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I need to return a set of filtered records from the database which coordinates are within the current maps bounds (map.getBounds())

According to Google Maps API v3 this is possible to do client side using their api and the function "containsLatLng(latlng:GLatLng)", but I want to do this implementation in the server side and then just returned the records that are within this coordinates.

My current implementation works if map is centered in the Africa, but if the map is showing China and Canada in the same view, then my implementation doesn't work because the longitude flips from positive to negative in the Pacific.

Any suggestions on how to implement this accurately?

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  • Not an expert on this, so I'd rather comment than answer, is the problem that the longitude flips from positive to negative in the pacific? That would then throw the bounds off. – Rob Haupt Oct 27 '11 at 13:46
  • @RobHaupt. Exactly, thats the problem basically! I'll use the Polyline to see if it is actually throwing the bounds off. – byte_slave Oct 27 '11 at 13:53
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In Google Maps, the LatLngBounds object constructor takes the southwest and northeast corners of the rectangular bounds.

Knowing that one point is the southwest corner and not the southeast corner is crucial to solving the problem.

If you know that one point is the southwest corner and the other the northeast corner, then compare the two corners' longitudes. Your algorithm will work like this:

  • If the longitude of the southwest corner is less than the longitude of the northeast corner, than a point is within the bounds if it has a longitude between those two longitudes and a latitude between the two latitudes of the corners. (This is probably what you're doing for everything which is why it works in Africa where the condition is true, but not in something that spans the Pacific Ocean.)

  • If the longitude of the southwest corner is more than the longitude of the northeast corner, than your bounds crosses 0 longitude and you need to reverse the condition: A point iswithin the bounds if it has a longitude that is not numerically between the longitude of the southwest corner and the longitude of the northeast corner.

For simplicity and because it is almost certainly true, I am assuming that you will never have a bounds that covers the North Pole or the South Pole. (In Google Maps, I don't even know if you can have such a bounds.)

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