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Table = BLOCK (Has composite unique index both the columns)

IP_ADDRESS   CIDR_SIZE
=========    ==========
10.10         16
15.0          16
67.7          16
18.0           8

Requirements:

  • Sub block is not allowed. For e.g. 67.7.1 and 24 is not allowed as this is child of 67.7. In other words, if there is any IP address in the database that matches beginning portion of new IP, then it should fail. Is it possible for me to do it using a Oracle SQL query?

I was thinking of doing it by...

  1. Select all records into the memory.
  2. Convert each IP into its binary bits

    10.10 = 00001010.00001010
    15.0 = 00001111.00000000
    67.7 = 01000011.00000111
    18.0 = 00010010.00000000

  3. Convert new IP into binary bit. 67.7.1 = 01000011.00000111.00000001

  4. Check to see if new IP binary bits start with existing IP binary bits.
  5. If true, then the new record exists in the database. For example, new binary bit 01000011.00000111.00000001 does start with existing ip (67.7) binary bits 01000011.00000111. Rest of records don't match.

I am looking to see if there a Oracle query that can do this for me, that is return the matching IP addresses from the database. I checked out Oracle's Text API, but didn't find anything just yet.

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Is there a reason you can't use the INSTR function? http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/functions068.htm#i77598

I'd do something like a NOT EXISTS clause that checks for INSTR(b_outer.IP_ADDRESS,b_inner.IP_ADDRESS) <> 1

*edit: thinking about this you'd probably need to check to see if the result is 1 (meaning the potential IP address matches starting at the first character of an existing IP address) as opposed to a general substring search as I originally had it.

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  • Instr wont work if the number of bits dont overlap on a factor of 8. e.g. 10.224/11 is a parent of 10.240/12 But not 10.176/12 – Sodved Oct 27 '11 at 15:30
  • Thanks. I don't mind adding another column to the table that keeps ip_address as its binary bit format, if that helps me achieve this using just a query, perhaps something that is opposite to LIKE clause. – Sannu Oct 27 '11 at 15:42
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Yes you can do it in SQL by converting IP's to numbers and then ensureing this is not a record with a smaller cidr size that gives the same ipnum when using its cidr size.

WITH ipv AS
(   SELECT  IP.*
        ,   NVL(REGEXP_SUBSTR( ip, '\d+', 1, 1 ),0) * 256 * 256 * 256  -- octet1
        +   NVL(REGEXP_SUBSTR( ip, '\d+', 1, 2 ),0) * 256 * 256        -- octet2
        +   NVL(REGEXP_SUBSTR( ip, '\d+', 1, 3 ),0) * 256              -- octet3
        +   NVL(REGEXP_SUBSTR( ip, '\d+', 1, 4 ),0)  AS ipnum          -- octet4
        ,   32-bits                 AS ignorebits
    FROM  ips IP
)
SELECT  IP1.ip, IP1.bits
FROM    ipv IP1
WHERE   NOT EXISTS
    (   SELECT  1
        FROM    ipv IP2
        WHERE   IP2.bits < IP1.bits
        AND     TRUNC( IP2.ipnum / POWER( 2, IP2.ignorebits ) )
              = TRUNC( IP1.ipnum / POWER( 2, IP2.ignorebits ) )
    )

Note: My example uses the table equivalent to yours:

SQL> desc ips
 Name                                      Null?    Type
 ----------------------------------------- -------- ----------------------------
 IP                                        NOT NULL VARCHAR2(16)
 BITS                                      NOT NULL NUMBER
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