3

I have this code :

HTML

<div class="temperatura">
    <a href="/link/" class="temperatura_localita">
        <div style="padding-left:12px;">
            Text1
        </div>
    </a>
    
    <a href="/link/" class="temperatura_dettagli">
        <div style="padding-right:70px;">            
            Text2
        </div>
    </a>        
</div>

CSS

.temperatura
{
    height:34px;
    position:relative;
    background-color:#FF0000;
    font-size:14px;
    font-weight:bold;
}

.temperatura_localita
{
    width:50%;
    height:34px;
    line-height:34px;
    float:left;
    text-decoration:none;
}

.temperatura_dettagli
{
    width:50%;
    height:34px;
    line-height:34px;
    float:left;
    text-align:right;
    text-decoration:none;
}

I need two linkable element (50% each) with a padding left(first) and right(the second).

The only strategy I know is to make two a (floatted) with internal divs with padding.

But it is "incorrect". So how can I do this?

EDIT

The other solution is just change the internal div (the ones with padding) with span : http://jsfiddle.net/p8Mps/3/

But try to enlarge/decrease the window on IE7 : it will fails...

  • 3
    Why is it "incorrect"? Afaik, <a> can only contain inline elements, no block level elements. Thus, a div (speaking css) is "incorrect" (per DTD) – knittl Oct 27 '11 at 14:50
  • @knittl: the a element has a transparent content model, meaning that it can contain anything which its parent can contain, including block level elements. – s4y Oct 27 '11 at 14:57
  • @Sidnicious: maybe in HTML5 (is it final yet?). I was actually talking about HTML4 (haven't mentioned it though) – knittl Oct 27 '11 at 15:04
  • 1
    @Sidnicious: HTML 4.01 specifications state that <a> elements may only contain inline elements. A <div> is a block level element, so it must not appear inside an <a>. – Sparky Oct 27 '11 at 15:10
  • 1
    You cannot add padding to the a elements 50% : it will also take the padding space, and it will create a new line. I supposed this was clear... – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:13
1
0

<a> (anchors) are inline elements.

<div> (divisions) are block level elements.

HTML 4.01 specifications state that <a> elements may only contain inline elements. A <div> is a block level element, so it must not appear inside an <a>.

Never put block level elements inside inline elements.

You would put inline elements inside block level elements instead...

<div class="temperatura">
    <div style="padding-left:12px;">
        <a href="/link/" class="temperatura_localita">
            Text1
       </a>
    </div>
    <div style="padding-right:70px;">
        <a href="/link/" class="temperatura_dettagli">      
            Text2
        </a> 
    </div>       
</div>

EDIT based on OP's comments...

http://jsfiddle.net/sparky672/p8Mps/9/

<div class="temperatura">
    <div class="temperatura_localita">
        <a href="/link/" style="margin-left:12px;">
            Text1
       </a>
    </div>
    <div class="temperatura_dettagli">
        <a href="/link/" style="margin-right:70px;">      
            Text2
        </a> 
    </div>       
</div>

EDIT 2 based on further comments...

http://jsfiddle.net/sparky672/p8Mps/13/

<div class="temperatura">
    <a href="/link1/" class="temperatura_localita">
        <span>Text1</span>
    </a>

    <a href="/link2/" class="temperatura_dettagli"> 
        <span>Text2</span>
    </a>   
</div>
| improve this answer | |
  • ?? I need them inline. I need 50% both: adding a padding to the a href will put in two line the a elements. – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:11
  • I'm embarassed :O Why your example works? Its strange. In fact, putting margin on css stylesheet fails jsfiddle.net/p8Mps/6 . What's happening? – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:29
  • @markzzz, why not use margins instead of padding? Then leave the inner div's at 50% each and put the margins on the <a> tags. See edited answer & fiddle... jsfiddle.net/sparky672/p8Mps/8 – Sparky Oct 27 '11 at 15:32
  • @markzzz, it's failing because now you're putting the margin on the class applied to the div. In my example, the margin was applied to the <a>. – Sparky Oct 27 '11 at 15:33
  • Oh ok. Now I see. Anyway, the last option have another behaviour : the whole container (div) in fact is not "linked" as my example. – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:35
2
0

I would make the 'a' tags

display: block;

That will give you the ability to style them as if they were div tags and you can add the padding left and padding right accordingly.

| improve this answer | |
  • yeah, I can also style these as I want, becuase they are float:left; – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 14:54
1
0

Take knittl's comment into consideration. I can think of 2 possible solutions:

1)Use only the div's (without the a tags), and use the onclick attribute to redirect to your desired url.

2) Add display:block to the a css and omit the div's. Then style tha a tags as desired

| improve this answer | |
  • No. You cannot put div into an a element. Is wrong. Firefox maybe can correct this error, but IE won't do it. Also, I will avoid javascript... – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:25
  • Soluton 1 gets a "F" in accessibility (how would users navigating via keyboard, much less screenreader users access those links?) – steveax Oct 27 '11 at 15:26
  • That's what i said, use either a or div, not div in a. Anyway, i think it's not too complicated, if you play around with it you'll manage to do what you want ;) – CdB Oct 27 '11 at 15:28
1
0

You don't need a container to add padding to an anchor. So, use:

<div class="temperatura">
    <a href="/link/" class="temperatura_localita" style="padding-left:12px;">
        Text1
    </a>

    <a href="/link/" class="temperatura_dettagli" style="padding-right:70px;">            
        Text2
    </a>        
</div>

If you really need a container, change div to span, and add display:block to the span element. After this declaration, the <span> element will "behave" similar to the <div> element.

| improve this answer | |
  • I see that I just use <span style="padding-left:12px;"> instead of div : it gets the padding. But on IE7, 50% on padded span sometimes sucks... – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:12
  • Check my EDIT on the question. You don't need display:block for internal span, but fail on IE7 on scrolling... – markzzz Oct 27 '11 at 15:17
  • @markzzz Another method is to usespecific display properties, see jsfiddle.net/p8Mps/7 – Rob W Oct 27 '11 at 15:31

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