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I'm writing a .bat file to handle some script generation automatically so I don't have to type in half a dozen command arguments each time I want to run it.

I have to run a vb script from the batch file

@call ..\Database\scripts\runscriptupdates.vbs

However the script will only run if using the the command prompt from

C:\Windows\SysWOW64\cmd.exe

By default the bat file uses the cmd.exe in system32

C:\Windows\System32\cmd.exe

Is there a way to force the batch file to use this cmd.exe to run the vbs file? I've been trawling the web for about an hour now and haven't found anything which helps (so far).

I've tried running the syswow64 with "start ..." however it doesn't seem to take the arguments after it.

Many thanks, Neil

3

You can try:

%windir%\SysWoW64\cmd.exe /c mybatch.bat

This will run the batch itself from a 32-bit command prompt. Thus, the call to your vbs will also be coming from a 32-bit command prompt.

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  • This does the trick, opens up the new window and then everything runs as it should. It'd be nice to be able to do it in one batch file though so I'll leave the question open for a day before picking an answer. Thanks again for the help! – Neil Oct 27 '11 at 15:05
1

I also had this problem, and I found the way to solve it.
You just need to change System Variables.

Go to Control Panel » System » Advanced System Settings » Environment Variables.

Find the variable ComSpec, then just click Edit... and change the path to "C:\Windows\SysWow64\cmd.exe"

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0

Try typing this one line in your batch file.

%windir%\SysWoW64\cmd.exe /c ["]cscript [script name] [host options] [script arguments]["]

Where:

  • script name is the name of the script file, including the file name extension and any necessary path information.

  • host options are the command-line switches that enable or disable various Windows Script Host features. Host options are always preceded by two slashes (//).

  • script arguments are the command-line switches that are passed to the script. Script arguments are always preceded by one slash (/).

Example:

%windir%\SysWoW64\cmd.exe /c "cscript VoltageDrop.vbs /"Campbell.sin" "L08""

Note: In this line I do not pass any host options. This command will execute the string,

cscript VoltageDrop.vbs /"Campbell.sin" "L08"

as a command in the 32-bit command prompt.

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