6

According to MSDN, Visual C++ can emit C4523 warning 'class' : multiple destructors specified. How is such situation even possible?

I tried the following:

class Class {
    ~Class();
    ~Class(int);
};

which yields a destructor must have a 'void' parameter list error and C4523 warning and the following

class Class {
    ~Class();
    ~Class();
};

which yields member function already defined or declared error and the following

class Class {
    int ~Class();
    ~Class();
};

which yields a destructor cannot have a return type error.

So how do I have C4523 warning and no error?

  • I suspect the answer is "none". – Billy ONeal Oct 27 '11 at 15:51
3

The following causes warning C4523 but it is also preceded by an error

struct Foo 
{
  ~Foo() {}
  ~Foo() const {}
};


error C2583: 'Foo::~Foo' : 'const' 'this' pointer is illegal for constructors/destructors
warning C4523: 'Foo' : multiple destructors specified
| improve this answer | |
2

Here's another example of multiple destructors being an error, not a warning:

class C
{
    ~C();
    ~C() volatile;
};
| improve this answer | |
  • I've never seen a volatile function before. – Mooing Duck Oct 27 '11 at 16:57
  • @MooingDuck: It's much like the const tag that Praetorian added an example of. I considered using const because more people are familiar with it, but felt there was more of a legitimate reason to have a different destructor for a volatile object. But the C++ standard thinks differently, the volatile modifier is allowed on ordinary member functions but not the destructor. – Ben Voigt Oct 27 '11 at 18:09
0

A wild guess: could it be through multiple class inheritance? Say if class C inherits from both class A and B, and A and B specify a destructor but C doesn't.

| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    Then a default destructor will be generated - no reason for warning. – sharptooth Oct 27 '11 at 15:48

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