1

My database has a table that looks like:

conditionID, conditionType, conditionValue

ConditionType is an enumeration with values like Integer, String, DateTime, etc.

The ConditionValue is stored as a string.

Now I want to encapsulate this row in a class such that I can perform comparison's on the ConditionValue, so this like EqualTo, GreaterThan, LessThan etc.

At the moment my design isn't correct because I have methods like (otherValue is the value I am comparing against):

GreaterThan(string value, string otherValue);
GreaterThan(int value, int otherValue);
GreaterThan(DateTime value, DateTime otherValue);

Could I somehow make a ConditionValue class that encapsulates this information so I can do:

GreaterThan(IConditionValue condition, IConditionValue otherValue)
2
2

This should be easily be able to be modeled using the Adaptive Object Model or Type Object patterns. It might be over kill for your situation though.

http://adaptiveobjectmodel.com/

http://www.cs.ox.ac.uk/jeremy.gibbons/dpa/typeobject.pdf

It allows you to reconfigure your model at run-time, add/remove behavior at will, define rules, etc.

0
1

All of the types you mentioned implement IComparable, so you can simply assume the type will be IComparable and use the CompareTo() method.

bool GreaterThan(IComparable value, IComparable otherValue)
{
    return value.CompareTo(otherValue) > 0;
}
1

This is a very naive example.

public class ConditionValue
{
    private object value;
    private IValueType valueType;

    public ConditionValue(object value, IValueType valueType)
    {
        this.value = value;
        this.valueType = valueType;
    }

    public bool GreaterThan(ConditionValue cv)
    {
        return valueType.GreaterThan(this.value, cv.value);
    }
}

public interface IValueType
{
    bool GreaterThan(object left, object right);
}

public class IntegerType : IValueType
{
    public bool GreaterThan(object left, object right)
    {
        return (int)left > (int)right;
    }
}
3
  • ok this makes this more clearer for me, I can also check if its a collection in the integer.GreaterThan method etc. – codecompleting Oct 27 '11 at 16:34
  • You can use the IValueType<TType> interface to define your data type "archetypes" that will be stored in the database. Have a factory method that takes in the conditionType enum and returns an instance of ConditionValue using the value and the IValueType handler for that enum value. – Jeffrey Oct 27 '11 at 16:36
  • and that factory will return an int, string or a List<string>? hmmm..not sure I get it yet sorry. – codecompleting Oct 27 '11 at 18:44
1
    public enum ValueType
    {
        String = 0,
        Integer = 1,
        CustomDataType = 3
    }

    public interface IValueType : IComparer<object>
    {
        string ToString(object obj);
    }

    public class IntegerValueType : IValueType
    {
        public int Compare(object left, object right)
        {
            return ((int)left).CompareTo((int)right);
        }

        public string ToString(object obj)
        {
            return ((int)obj).ToString();
        }
    }

    public class StringValueType : IValueType
    {
        public int Compare(object left, object right)
        {
            return ((string)left).CompareTo((string)right);
        }

        public string ToString(object obj)
        {
            return ((string)obj).ToString();
        }
    }

    public class Value : IComparable<Value>
    {
        private object value;
        private IValueType valueType;

        public Value(object value, IValueType valueType)
        {
            this.value = value;
            this.valueType = valueType;
        }

        public static implicit operator Value(string value)
        {
            return ValueFactory.Create(value, ValueType.String);
        }

        public int CompareTo(Value obj)
        {
            return this.valueType.Compare(this.value, obj.value);
        }

        public static bool operator <(Value left, Value right)
        {
            return left.CompareTo(right) == -1;
        }

        public static bool operator >(Value left, Value right)
        {
            return left.CompareTo(right) == 1;
        }

        public static bool operator ==(Value left, Value right)
        {
            return left.CompareTo(right) == 0;
        }

        public static bool operator !=(Value left, Value right)
        {
            return left.CompareTo(right) != 0;
        }

        public override string ToString()
        {
            return this.valueType.ToString(this.value);
        }
    }

    public class ValueFactory
    {
        private static IDictionary<object, IValueType> _valueTypes =
            new Dictionary<object, IValueType>();

        static ValueFactory()
        {
            _valueTypes.Add(ValueType.String, new StringValueType());
            _valueTypes.Add(ValueType.Integer, new IntegerValueType());
        }

        public static Value Create(object value, object valueType)
        {
            //
            // This logic could be extended to find a ValueType that supports
            // one of the types in the objects inheritance tree. This would
            // also require creating an ObjectValueType, which would be a last
            // resort in the case of the object type not being supported.
            //
            if (!_valueTypes.ContainsKey(valueType))
                throw new ArgumentException("valueType is not supported");

            return new Value(value, _valueTypes[valueType]);
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int x = 32;
            int y = 16;

            Value cx = ValueFactory.Create(x, ValueType.Integer);
            Value cy = ValueFactory.Create(y, ValueType.Integer);

            Console.WriteLine("cx = "+cx);
            Console.WriteLine("cy = "+cy);
            Console.WriteLine("x<y = {0}", cx < cy);
            Console.WriteLine("x>y = {0}", cx > cy);
            Console.WriteLine("x==y = {0}", cx == cy);
            Console.WriteLine("x!=y = {0}", cx != cy);

            Value name = ValueFactory.Create("Jeffrey Schultz", ValueType.String);
            Console.WriteLine("{0} == You = {1}", name, name == "You");

            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
0
public interface IValueComparer
{
    bool GreaterThan(string source, string destination);
    bool LessThan(string source, string destination);
}

public class IntToIntComparer : IValueComparer
{
    public bool GreaterThan(string source, string detination)
    {
        // better use TryParse and handle exception
        return Int32.Parse(source) > Int32.Parse(detination);
    }

    public bool LessThan(string source, string detination)
    {
        // better use TryParse and handle exception
        return Int32.Parse(source) < Int32.Parse(detination);
    }
}

public class DateToDateComparer : IValueComparer
{
    public bool GreaterThan(string source, string detination)
    {
        // better use TryParse and handle exception
        return DateTime.Parse(source) > DateTime.Parse(detination);
    }

    public bool LessThan(string source, string detination)
    {
        // better use TryParse and handle exception
        return DateTime.Parse(source) < DateTime.Parse(detination);
    }
}

public class StringToStringComparer : IValueComparer
{
    public bool GreaterThan(string source, string detination)
    {
        return source.Length > detination.Length;
    }

    public bool LessThan(string source, string detination)
    {
        return source.Length < detination.Length;
    }
}


public class Condition
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public string Value { get; set; }
    public string Type { get; set; }
    public IValueComparer Comparer{get; set;}

    public static string Integer { get { return "Integer"; } }
    public static string String { get { return "String"; } }
    public static string DateTime { get { return "DateTime"; } }

    public static Condition CreateForType(string type)
    {
        if (type == Integer)
            return new Condition { Type = type, Comparer = new IntToIntComparer() };
        if (type == String)
            return new Condition { Type = type, Comparer = new StringToStringComparer() };
        if (type == DateTime)
            return new Condition { Type = type, Comparer = new DateToDateComparer() };
        return null;
    }

    public bool GreaterThan(Condition destination)
    {
        return Comparer.GreaterThan(Value, destination.Value);
    }

    public static bool operator >(Condition source, Condition destination)
    {
        return source.GreaterThan(destination);
    }

    public static bool operator <(Condition source, Condition destination)
    {
        return source.LessThan(destination);
    }

    public bool LessThan(Condition destination)
    {
        return Comparer.LessThan(Value, destination.Value);
    }
}

        var condition1 = Condition.CreateForType("Integer");
        condition1.ID = 1;
        condition1.Value = "5";

        var condition2 = Condition.CreateForType("Integer");
        condition2.ID = 2;
        condition2.Value = "10";

        bool result1 = condition1 > condition2;
        bool result2 = condition1.LessThan(condition2);
6
  • But I'm getting the data from the database at runtime, not sure how this will work? – codecompleting Oct 27 '11 at 16:10
  • how do you get the data from database, give an example – Mohamed Abed Oct 27 '11 at 16:11
  • You need to create a class that represents the data type defined by the conditionType, such as IntegerType. IntegerType knows how to compare integer values. Also, you would need a Condition that accepts a value and a data type handler. – Jeffrey Oct 27 '11 at 16:16
  • @MohamedAbed I gave an example of my database columns in the question, so I will return rows with values for those columns. – codecompleting Oct 27 '11 at 16:17
  • How will this allow you to compare numerics? How would you write "your code here"? I am pretty sure if you write "if (source > destination)", it won't compile. – Jeffrey Oct 27 '11 at 16:33

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.