0

Perhaps I'm doing this wrong. I want to set up a base class and two classes that inherit from that class. However, it is telling me that one child is an instanceof the other child... that can't be correct, can it? What am i doing wrong here?

function BaseClass(){}
function Child1(){}

Child1.prototype = BaseClass.prototype;
Child1.prototype.constructor = Child1;

function Child2(){}
Child2.prototype = BaseClass.prototype;
Child2.prototype.constructor = Child2;

console.log((new Child1() instanceof Child2)); // true
  • Here's a good resource on the many ways of using inheritance in JS: 3site.eu/doc – Cᴏʀʏ Oct 27 '11 at 16:10
2

Child1.prototype = BaseClass.prototype;

Should be Child1.prototype = Object.create(BaseClass.prototype)

You don't want the prototype object to be the same, you want a new prototype object that inherits from BaseClass

Live Example

Disclaimer: Object.create is ES5, use the ES5-shim for legacy platform support.

To give you a more thorough example :

// Create base prototype
var Base = {
  method: function () {
    return this.things;
  },
  constructor: function (things) {
    this.things = things;
  }
};
// Link constructor and prototype
Base.constructor.prototype = Base;

// Create child prototype that inherits from Base
var Child = Object.create(Base);
// overwrite constructor
Child.constructor = function (things) {
  things++;
  Base.constructor.call(things);
}
// Link constructor and prototype
Child.constructor.prototype = Child;

// Swap prototype and constructor around to support new
ChildFactory = Child.constructor;

var c = new ChildFactory(41);
console.log(c.method()); // 42

Visually:

var Base = { ... }

here we simply create an object with methods and properties. We want to be able to create an instance of this object. So Base is a "class" and all it's methods and properties can be accessed from the instances (including constructor).

Base.constructor.prototype = Base;

You need to link the "Constructor function" which is a function you can call with new which will give you a new instance of the object ConstructorFunction.prototype together with the prototype object. This is basically a bit of glue you need to do manually because ES does not do this for you.

If you forgot to do this then the constructor function (which is X.constructor) doesn't have a .prototype property to make instances inherit from.

var Child = Object.create(Base);

Create a new object whose [[Prototype]] is Base. This basically is the start of your prototype chain

Child -> ([[Prototype]] = Base) -> ([[Prototype]] = Object.prototype) -> null

Child.x = ...

Now we add properties to our child object which are the methods instances of Child will inherit. Basically we are creating a new prototype object to inherit from. All instances will share the methods and also share the methods up the prototype chain (including Base).

ChildFactory = Child.constructor;

the new key word only works on constructor functions and not prototype objects so we need to basically say "switch our prototype object variable to the constructor function variable"

Personally when building up "classes" I find the prototype objects really pleasant to handle directly and when creating instances I find the constructor functions pleasant to handle.

Now when we call var c = new Child(41);

It will call the constructor function we defined which will increment things, then call the base constructor.

Note at this point the prototype chain of c looks like

c -> ([[Prototype]] = Child) 
  -> ([[Prototype]] = Base) 
  -> ([[Prototype]] = Object.prototype) 
  -> null
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks! This works like a charm... I'll have to do some more reading on this to see what is going on behind the scenes. There are so many different examples on the net about how to do inheritance properly, and they all seem to have parameterless constructors to avoid the hard bits :) – Paul Oct 27 '11 at 16:20
3

You've set the prototype of both your classes to exactly the same object ("BaseClass.prototype"), and set the "constructor" property on it to "Child2". In other words "Child1.prototype" and "Child2.prototype" are the same, so there's only one "constructor" property involved in your code, and it ends up being "Child2".

Maybe you want to set those prototypes to instances of BaseClass?

Child1.prototype = new BaseClass();
Child1.prototype.constructor = Child1;

Child2.prototype = new BaseClass(); // a different object
Child2.prototype.constructor = Child2;

(@Raynos points out that instantiating the prototype value like that may cause subtle problems, so you might prefer using the approach in his answer.)

| improve this answer | |
  • You really should avoid .prototype = new X() you dont want to initialize .prototype as an instance of X, you just want to instantiate. (i.e. don't call the constructor!) – Raynos Oct 27 '11 at 16:05
  • What happens when your base class constructor has arguments -- do you need to initialize them right then and there? My real child class code has a call to BaseClass.call(this, 'argument1', 'argument2'); in its constructor. – Paul Oct 27 '11 at 16:09
  • OK @Raynos yes that's probably true; I don't do that sort of thing often enough to have dealt with such issues :-) I'll add a not. – Pointy Oct 27 '11 at 16:09
  • @ShyGuy I think that's why many object frameworks use a convention of having an "init" function to call. – Pointy Oct 27 '11 at 16:12
  • @ShyGuy you don't initialize them then and there, you do it in the constructor of the child. – Raynos Oct 27 '11 at 16:12
1

If you assign to prototype, doesn't that mean that you overwrite it completely? So that Child1 and Child2 actually become BaseClass objects, rather than child classes.

See also http://www.zipcon.net/~swhite/docs/computers/languages/object_oriented_JS/inheritance.html . Proper OO in JS takes quite some effort.

| improve this answer | |
1

It doesn't mean the check whether the object new Child1() is created by the “Child1” constructor. The instanceof operator only takes an object prototype — (new Child1()).[[Prototype]] and checks its presence in the prototype chain, starring examination from the “Child1.prototype”. Operator instanceof is activated via the internal [[HasInstance]] method of the constructor. So you need to change your code in the following way:

function BaseClass(){}
function Child1(){}

Child1.prototype = new BaseClass();
Child1.prototype.constructor = Child1;

function Child2(){}
Child2.prototype = new BaseClass();
Child2.prototype.constructor = Child2;
console.log((new Child1() instanceof Child2)); // false

And it will be correct implementation of OOP in javascript

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.