3

I am looking to create a MySQL query that finds all records that are within a specified area of the world. Each record contains a point (lat/lon), and I have the top-right (lat/lon) and bottom-left (lat/lon) corners of the specified area.

With this information, how can I find the appropriate records?

6
0

LAT1 = MIN(top-right lat, bottom-left lat)

LAT2 = MAX(top-right lat, bottom-left lat)

LON1 = MIN(top-right lon, bottom-left lon)

LON2 = MAX(top-right lon, bottom-left lon)

SELECT fields
FROM points
WHERE lat BETWEEN LAT1 AND LAT2
AND lon BETWEEN LON1 AND LON2

This way, the query should handle if you cross the Prime Meridian or the equator with your box.

To handle the 180th meridian (or antimeridian), you would need to compare the right-lon to the left-lon, checking to see if the right number is negative and the left number is positive. If so, then you've crossed the 180th meridian. Your query would then have to look something like this:

SELECT fields
FROM points
WHERE lat BETWEEN LAT1 AND LAT2
AND (lon BETWEEN -180 AND LON1 OR lon BETWEEN LON2 AND 180)

I'd rather not think of how to handle a box that sits on the top or bottom of the planet over one of the true poles, though. =)

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    that wouldn't handle the Anti-Meridian. The Prime and equator are easy ones. How do you handle Anti? – JT703 Oct 27 '11 at 19:08
  • 2
    I'm not doing one for covering one of the poles. :P – Crontab Oct 27 '11 at 19:35
  • I don't think this will work if the box is not aligned on the longitude (imagine a diamond around NY city). In general, you would need to use a projection and then the point in polygon test. – TreyA Oct 27 '11 at 20:43
  • @TreyA: no, it wouldn't work in the case you mentioned, but the OP only gave us the top-right and bottom-left points so it is most likely just a rectangle. – Crontab Oct 27 '11 at 20:57
  • Yes, I reread that the upper and lower corners are given. I still get nervous when I see linear boxes described by lat/lon ;) – TreyA Oct 27 '11 at 21:04
-1
0

Just look for all points that are less than the right edge and greater than the left edge, which being less than the bottom edge and greater than the top edge.

Point at 4,4 and your top right is (5,5) and bottom left is (3,3) - 3<4<5 for x and 3<4<5 for y. You've got a match.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Please explain your downvotes, it helps no one (including me) if you don't leave an explanation. – Whetstone Oct 27 '11 at 20:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.