3

We are using an API that basically does this

var t = TimeSpan.MaxValue;
int x = (int)t.TotalMilliseconds;

where x will end up being passed to System.Threading.WaitHandle.WaitOne(int).

The problem is when this code runs in our dev and staging environments, it doesn't throw any errors but when it runs in production it does throw:

Exception: System.ArgumentOutOfRangeException
Message: Number must be either non-negative and less than or equal to Int32.MaxValue or -1.
Parameter name: millisecondsTimeout

When I test this with a simple console app (both x86 and x64) the result of x = -2147483648 (int.MinValue) while when I run the code in the immediate window I get x = 1566804069.

What is going on?

Note: staging and production are all cloned from a single VM so there are no differences between them

THIS IS CODE THAT WE CANNOT CHANGE! Otherwise I wouldn't be asking this question.

  • 1
    Your conversion overflows, that why you are getting two different results, type cast to long or Int64 – Emmanuel N Oct 27 '11 at 18:42
  • @Tony no, if it was checked it would be an overflow exception; the exception cited suggests either that the duration is wrapping because it is unchecked, or that the interval was negative to start with. – Marc Gravell Oct 27 '11 at 18:51
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    @Dustin that isn't going to work; the max timespan is 10,675,199 days; int.MaxValue in milliseconds is 25 days. That is not going to fit! – – Marc Gravell Oct 27 '11 at 18:54
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    @Tony if checked vs unchecked was the issue, it would indeed error, but it would be a different error (OverflowException) – Marc Gravell Oct 27 '11 at 18:55
  • @Marc - I'm being slow. I think that means this question doesn't have enough information. – Tony Lee Oct 27 '11 at 18:58
4

The only way this can happen with identical VM's is if the CPU is different on the production machine from the CPU on the staging machine - as Gabe asked about in the comments to the question and zdan suggested in his answer.

So specifically as to what is going on. For machines that support SSE2, the cvttsd2si instruction is used by .NET to convert the double into an int, where overflow is mapped to 0x80000000 (Int.MinValue). On machines w/o SSE2 support, I could only look at the Rotor sources, and in jithelpers.cpp, it simply casts the double to an int32 - which w/o SSE2 on VC10 C++, ends up returning the value in the lower 32 bits so the value passed to wait should be 1566804069 (0x5D638865) as you saw in the immediate window.

The CPUs are different and your "fix" w/o modifying the code is to change machines to something that doesn't supports SSE2. See the SSE2 wikipedia entry to check the production server's CPU vs the staging server. If you're lucky, maybe it can be disabled in your server's bios (or the VMs config/bios).

If you're daring, you can try patching the IL to fix the problem - what the code really wanted was -1 as the timeout, which is "wait forever". By using ilasm and ildasm you might be able to fix it w/o source (I'm assuming this is the reason you can't change it). I did this succesfully myself on a test program - ildasm test.exe /out=test.il to turn the an assembly into IL, edited the IL and finally ilasm test.il /exe to create a new assembly. Below is what my IL looked like and how I fixed it.

// bad code
// var t = TimeSpan.MaxValue;
IL_0008:  call       instance float64System.TimeSpan::get_TotalMilliseconds()

// int x = (int)t.TotalMilliseconds;
IL_000D:  conv.i4    // This is the line that becomes cvttsd2si when jitted
IL_000E:  stloc.2

// wh.WaitOne(x);
IL_000F:  ldloc.0
IL_0010:  ldloc.2
IL_0011:  callvirt   instance bool System.Threading.WaitHandle::WaitOne(int32)

The fix is to reload x (location 2 here) with -1 before calling Wait one

// fixed code
// var t = TimeSpan.MaxValue;
IL_0008:  call       instance float64System.TimeSpan::get_TotalMilliseconds()

// int x = (int)t.TotalMilliseconds;
IL_000D:  conv.i4    // This is the line that becomes cvttsd2si when jitted
IL_000E:  stloc.2

// x = -1; // Fix by forcing x to -1 (infinite timeout)
          ldc.i4.m1  // push a -1
          stloc.2    // pop and store it in 'x'

// wh.WaitOne(x);
IL_000F:  ldloc.0
IL_0010:  ldloc.2
IL_0011:  callvirt   instance bool System.Threading.WaitHandle::WaitOne(int32)

Note that in this case, 'x' is local #2 - the IL at the top of the method will give you the correct # so the 2 in stloc.2 needs to be changed to whatever # x is has been assigned, which should match the # in the ldloc instruction just before the call the WaitOne at label IL_0010 in my example.

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  • I give you the answer for the effort. I ended up 1) reporting the bug and they ar egoing to fix it and let me know when a new version is out 2) I used PostSharp to apply an aspect that intercepts the Milliseconds property and I change it to an appropriate value (Fancy way of doing what you suggest). But you have provided a great solution. – Dustin Davis Oct 29 '11 at 18:59
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TimeSpan.MaxValue.TotalMilliseconds is a double that is equal to 922337203685477, which is larger than Int32.MaxValue (2147483647). What the cast will do in this case is implementation specific (technically it's undefined see @phoog's comment below) and will likely depend on the CPU, which might explain the differences you are seeing.

In one case, the cast leads to a value that is acceptable to System.Threading.WaitHandle.WaitOne(int) and in the other case it isn't.

This seems to be a bug in the library you are using. There is a WaitOne overload that takes a TimeSpan as an argument, so I don't know why they didn't use that. If you can't change the library, you are out of luck.

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  • Yeah it's a bug. Very irritating. – Dustin Davis Oct 27 '11 at 19:12
  • Are you sure it would be implementation-specific? the behaviour for other operations (additional, multiplication, etc) is fully specified in overflow conditions (checked vs unchecked) - I find it odd that the narrowing conversion would not be qualified. – Marc Gravell Oct 27 '11 at 19:20
  • @Marc Gravell ECMA 335, partition III, 3.27 conv.<to type> – data conversion "If overflow occurs converting a floating-point type to an integer, or if the floating-point value being converted to an integer is a NaN, the value returned is unspecified." – phoog Oct 27 '11 at 19:30
  • @MarcGravell also, in ECMA 334, it's not "implementation-specific" but it is undefined: In an unchecked context, the conversion always succeeds, and proceeds as follows. • The value is rounded towards zero to the nearest integral value. If this integral value is within the range of the destination type, then this value is the result of the conversion. • Otherwise, the result of the conversion is an unspecified value of the destination type. – phoog Oct 27 '11 at 19:34
  • @phoog aaahhh, TotalMilliseconds is double! my bad; then yes. I was thinking of it as long, in which case it would simply trim the extra bits. But yes, for double that makes sense. – Marc Gravell Oct 27 '11 at 19:40
0

Your Conversion overflows that why you are getting different results for different systems. Use long instead

  var t = TimeSpan.MaxValue;
  long x = (long)t.TotalMilliseconds;
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  • Please REREAD the question, this is in an API that we're consuming so we can't change it otherwise I wouldn't be asking this question. – Dustin Davis Oct 27 '11 at 18:47
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    No, the correct thing to do is just call WaitOne(-1), but the OP can't do that because he's only in control of the environment, not the code. – Gabe Oct 27 '11 at 19:05
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TimeSpan.MaxValue is equivelant to Int64.MaxValue which is too large a value to pass to WaitOne(). If you want to pass a large value just use Int32.MaxValue.

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  • 1
    I don't get it, you have code that is crashing but you can't change it? How do you expect to fix this? – Dylan Smith Oct 27 '11 at 19:03
  • I can see the code using ILSpy. wiki.sharpdevelop.net/ILSpy.ashx I don't expect to fix the code, i'm looking to know why it works on two systems but not another. – Dustin Davis Oct 27 '11 at 19:05

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