1

If I have:

var myFunction = function() {
    var myInner = function() {
    }
}

then how do I call myFunction.myInner()?

1

Functions are scopes in JavaScript. You cannot call a function from within a function, unless, you declare it as a method. Some have suggested that you use objects or weird patterns, which may or may not be what you want...

If you want a "class-like" function with public/private methods and variables, do this:

//Declare your "class"
function Foo(specs) {

    //Can do whatever you want with specs
    //jQuery uses it to initialize plugin data ;)

    //These are examples of private variables
    var a = 1;
    var b = "b";

    //These are examples of public variables
    this.aa = 1;
    this.bb = "b";

    //This is a private method
    function Bar_Private(p0,p1) {...}

    //This is a public method
    this.Bar_Public = function(p0,p1) {...}

}

//Now to use it....
//Create an instance
var myInstance = new Foo();

//Using it
alert(myInstance.a);    //Reference Error
alert(myInstance.aa);   //Alerts 1

myInstance.Bar_Private(0,1);  //Reference Error
myInstance.Bar_Public(0,1);   //Calls Bar_Public with 0 and 1 as params

JavaScript does not have actual classes, but it is easiest to describe this pattern as "class-like".

Obviously, you can add as many public/private methods, objects, etc. as you like.

Also note, DO NOT FORGET THE "new" OPERATOR WHEN CREATING AN INSTANCE WITH THIS PATTERN...if you do, then "this" is bound to your global space and can override other application data (name collisions).

Hope this helps, good luck!

2
  • Well, this was a very complete answer. Thank you jyore! – Phillip Senn Nov 9 '11 at 15:33
  • No problem, glad I could help – jyore Nov 9 '11 at 23:13
3

you can call it this way:

var myFunction = function() {
    var myInner = function() {}

    return myInner;
}

myFunction()();

In your example, you are creating the inner function, but you have to return it to make it accessible.

1
  • that doesn't make any sense. Did you mean myFunction()()? – Esailija Oct 27 '11 at 19:39
3

You can also do something like:

var myFunction = function () {
   this.myInner = function () {
     //...
   }
}

var foo = new myFunction();
foo.myInner();

Or yet another pattern I use to kinda mimic static classes:

var myFunction = new function () {
   this.myInner = function () {
     //...
   }
};

myFunction.myInner();
2
  • 2
    To add, this. makes myInner function a publicly accessible function on the myFunction object, where as using var makes it private (via closures) – Matt Oct 27 '11 at 19:43
  • Yea, I also like the map approach that nheinrich mentioned too. It's great if you just need to group a bunch of functions together. My way is perhaps better if you need private variables and methods call other methods and what not. – Mike Christensen Oct 27 '11 at 19:48
2

If you constructed the object slightly differently you could use:

var myFunction = {
  innerFunction: function(txt){
    alert(txt);
  }    
}

myFunction.innerFunction("heyooo");

This may not be ideal though depending on what you are trying to achieve.

fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/neilheinrich/Xjegt/

1
  • I think this is a great example. – Phillip Senn Oct 27 '11 at 19:51
1

You can't. Let me reword a question to give a glimpse of the nightmarish world where it is possible to do what you asked

var myFunction = function() {
    for(var i=0; i<n; i++){ ... }
}
then how do I set myFunction.i?

If you want to access the inner function you need to return it or set a global variable or any of the things you would also do if it were a variable instead of a function.

0

In this case you can only call the inner function, when running code that is inside the outer function... unless you return the inner function somehow.

var myFunction = function() {
    var myInner = function() {
    }
    // you can call it here
    myInner();
}

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