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I have a vector of numbers between 1 and 100(this is not important) which can take sizes between 3 and 1.000.000 values.

If anyone can help me getting 3 value unique* combinations from that vector.

*Unique

Example: I have in the array the following values: 1[0] 5[1] 7[2] 8[3] 7[4] (the [x] is the index)

In this case 1[0] 5[1] 7[2] and 1[3] 5[1] 7[4] are different, but 1[0] 5[1] 7[2] and 7[2] 1[0] 5[1] are the same(duplicate)

My algorithm is a little slow when i work with a lot of values(example 1.000.000). So what i want is a faster way to do it.

           for(unsigned int x = 0;x<vect.size()-2;x++){
                for(unsigned int y = x+1;y<vect.size()-1;y++){
                    for(unsigned int z = y+1;z<vect.size();z++)
                    {

                        // do thing with vect[x],vect[y],vect[z]
                    }
                }
            }
6
  • 4
    Are you sure about the property that the numbers are between 1-100 is not important ?
    – r15habh
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:13
  • Is your goal to get every possible combination of values? If you have 10^9 values, you'll end up with 10^27 / 3 combinations to test. Doing "think" that many times might be expensive...
    – Brian
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:14
  • 1
    1,000,000 values have 1,000,000*999,999*999,998/6 unique combinations. Even if you get each of these combinations instantly, just looking at them would take forever!
    – Shahbaz
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:14
  • 1
    Your example (not the code) is confusing
    – KillianDS
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:27
  • 1[0] 5[1] 7[2] and 1[3] 5[1] 7[4] are diferent Are you absolutely, 100% certain about that? If so, then you cannot get more optimal (in a single thread). Oct 27 '11 at 20:53
4

In fact it is very very important that your values are between 1 and 100! Because with a vector of size 1,000,000 you have a lot of numbers that are equal and you don't need to inspect all of them! What you can do is the following:

Note: the following code is just an outline! It may lack sufficient error checking and is just here to give you the idea, not for copy paste!

Note2: When I wrote the answer, I assumed the numbers to be in the range [0, 99]. Then I read that they are actually in [1, 100]. Obviously this is not a problem and you can either -1 all the numbers or even better, change all the 100s to 101s.

bool exists[100] = {0};  // exists[i] means whether i exists in your vector

for (unsigned int i = 0, size = vect.size(); i < size; ++i)
    exists[vect[i]] = true;

Then, you do similar to what you did before:

for(unsigned int x = 0; x < 98; x++)
  if (exists[x])
    for(unsigned int y = x+1; y < 99; y++)
      if (exists[y])
        for(unsigned int z = y+1; z < 100; z++)
          if (exists[z])
          {
            // {x, y, z} is an answer
          }

Another thing you can do is spend more time in preparation to have less time generating the pairs. For example:

int nums[100];  // from 0 to count are the numbers you have
int count = 0;

for (unsigned int i = 0, size = vect.size(); i < size; ++i)
{
  bool exists = false;
  for (int j = 0; j < count; ++j)
    if (vect[i] == nums[j])
    {
      exists = true;
      break;
    }
  if (!exists)
    nums[count++] = vect[i];
}

Then

for(unsigned int x = 0; x < count-2; x++)
  for(unsigned int y = x+1; y < count-1; y++)
    for(unsigned int z = y+1; z < count; z++)
    {
      // {nums[x], nums[y], nums[z]} is an answer
    }

Let us consider 100 to be a variable, so let's call it k, and the actual numbers present in the array as m (which is smaller than or equal to k).

With the first method, you have O(n) preparation and O(m^2*k) operations to search for the value which is quite fast.

In the second method, you have O(nm) preparation and O(m^3) for generation of the values. Given your values for n and m, the preparation takes too long.

You could actually merge the two methods to get the best of both worlds, so something like this:

int nums[100];           // from 0 to count are the numbers you have
int count = 0;
bool exists[100] = {0};  // exists[i] means whether i exists in your vector

for (unsigned int i = 0, size = vect.size(); i < size; ++i)
{
  if (!exists[vect[i]])
    nums[count++] = vect[i];
  exists[vect[i]] = true;
}

Then:

for(unsigned int x = 0; x < count-2; x++)
  for(unsigned int y = x+1; y < count-1; y++)
    for(unsigned int z = y+1; z < count; z++)
    {
      // {nums[x], nums[y], nums[z]} is an answer
    }

This method has O(n) preparation and O(m^3) cost to find the unique triplets.

Edit: It turned out that for the OP, the same number in different locations are considered different values. If that is really the case, then I'm sorry, there is no faster solution. The reason is that all the possible combinations themselves are C(n, m) (That's a combination) that although you are generating each one of them in O(1), it is still too big for you.

0
2

There's really nothing that can be done to speed up the loop body you have there. Consider that with 1M vector size, you are making one trillion loop iterations.

Producing all combinations like that is an exponential problem, which means that you won't be able to practically solve it when the input size becomes large enough. Your only option would be to leverage specific knowledge of your application (what you need the results for, and how exactly they will be used) to "work around" the issue if possible.

4
  • It will be used to check if those 3 values can make a valid triangle.(a simple if)
    – Sinjuice
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:19
  • @Payn3: And you need that triangle to...? Don't answer here, there's no way you can provide enough information in a comment to do this kind of analysis.
    – Jon
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:21
  • The values are between 0 and 100, so you can actually improve it a lot
    – Shahbaz
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:40
  • 1
    @Payn3: so the are 1[0] 5[1] 7[2] and 1[3] 5[1] 7[4] actually different or not? You said they were, but if you're just checking triangles, then they wouldn't be different. Oct 27 '11 at 23:47
0

Possibly you can sort your input, make it unique, and pick x[a], x[b] and x[c] when a < b < c. The sort will be O(n log n) and picking the combination will be O(n³). Still you will have less triplets to iterate over:

std::vector<int> x = original_vector;
std::sort(x.begin(), x.end());
std::erase(std::unique(x.begin(), x.end()), x.end());
for(a = 0; a < x.size() - 2; ++a)
  for(b=a+1; b < x.size() - 1; ++b)
     for(c=b+1; c< x.size(); ++c
        issue triplet(x[a],x[b],x[c]);
0
0

Depending on your actual data, you may be able to speed it up significantly by first making a vector that has at most three entries with each value and iterate over that instead.

2
  • I think that would take a lot of memory, and generating it is exactly as fast as what he has now. Oct 27 '11 at 20:54
  • Not at all. What I was suggesting is essentially exactly the same as what shahbaz has above. Oct 27 '11 at 23:33
0

As r15habh pointed out, I think the fact that the values in the array are between 1-100 is in fact important.

Here's what you can do: make one pass through the array, reading values into a unique set. This by itself is O(n) time complexity. The set will have no more than 100 elements, which means O(1) space complexity.

Now since you need to generate all 3-item permutations, you'll still need 3 nested loops, but instead of operating on the potentially huge array, you'll be operating on a set that has at most 100 elements.

Overall time complexity depends on your original data set. For a small data set, time complexity will be O(n^3). For a large data set, it will approach O(n).

1
  • He says: 1[0] 5[1] 7[2] and 1[3] 5[1] 7[4] are diferent so you can't remove duplicate values. Oct 27 '11 at 20:55
0

If understand your application correctly then you can use a tuple instead, and store in either a set or hash table depending on your requirements. If the normal of the tri matters, then make sure that you shift the tri so that lets say the largest element is first, if normal shouldn't matter, then just sort the tuple. A version using boost & integers:

#include <set>
#include <algorithm>
#include "boost/tuple/tuple.hpp"
#include "boost/tuple/tuple_comparison.hpp"

int main()
{
    typedef boost::tuple< int, int, int > Tri;
    typedef std::set< Tri > TriSet;
    TriSet storage;
    // 1 duplicate
    int exampleData[4][3] = { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 2, 3, 6 }, { 5, 3, 2 }, { 2, 1, 3 } };
    for( unsigned int i = 0; i < sizeof( exampleData ) / sizeof( exampleData[0] ); ++i )    
    {
        std::sort( exampleData[i], exampleData[i] + ( sizeof( exampleData[i] ) / sizeof( exampleData[i][0] ) ) );
        if( !storage.insert( boost::make_tuple( exampleData[i][0], exampleData[i][1], exampleData[i][2] ) ).second )
            std::cout << "Duplicate!" << std::endl;
        else
            std::cout << "Not duplicate!" << std::endl;
    }
}
1
  • It would seem I've misunderstood your problem, doh.
    – Ylisar
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:57

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