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I've created table Address with this SQL query:

CREATE TABLE `address` (
  `id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `Street` varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL,
  `Number` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
  `other_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  FOREIGN KEY (`other_id`) REFERENCES `other` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci;

But there's also this query:

CREATE TABLE `address` (
  `id` bigint(20) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `Street` varchar(255) COLLATE utf8_unicode_ci DEFAULT NULL,
  `Number` smallint(6) DEFAULT NULL,
  `other_id` bigint(20) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `other_id` (`other_id`),
  CONSTRAINT `adress_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`other_id`) REFERENCES `other` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8 COLLATE=utf8_unicode_ci$$

and it seems that booth query create identical tables.

So can anyone explain to me what does this line do:

KEY `other_id` (`other_id`),

and what is the difference between these two lines:

  FOREIGN KEY (`other_id`) REFERENCES `other` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE
and
  CONSTRAINT `adress_ibfk_1` FOREIGN KEY (`other_id`) REFERENCES `other` (`id`) ON DELETE CASCADE ON UPDATE CASCADE

If the difference between last two lines is that latter gives name 'adress_ibfk_1' to foreign key ? If that's true - should I do it ? I mean, why should I name foreign keys ? Will I ever need their names ?

Thanks ! :)

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  • 4
    All developers on your project will hate you forever if you don't fix the name of the table to spell Address correctly.
    – HLGEM
    Oct 27 '11 at 20:22
  • @HLGEM: Oh, I assumed it was the location where a single item of women's party attire was being stored. Oct 27 '11 at 20:31
  • @HLGEM - Unless the table names are in Swedish:). But since field names are not in Swedish you are probably correct. Oct 27 '11 at 20:38
  • how many addresses do you think you'll be storing in that MASSIVE UNSIGNED BIGINT ? Your other datatypes also need addressing !!
    – Jon Black
    Oct 27 '11 at 23:15
2

MySQL interprets KEY as an index, so the second query creates an index on the column other_id.

The difference between the two FK declaration is that you manually set the name in the second line. In the first line, MySQL automatically sets a name.
They do need names, but you don't necessarily have to be aware of them. Some more advanced RDBMS use them to be more explicit when a query raises an error.

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  • Thank you !! But first query also creates index on column other_id. So does it get create even if I don't specify it, just like FK get's it's name ?
    – xx77aBs
    Oct 28 '11 at 9:23
  • xx77aBs : I'm not sure, but MySQL most likely creates automatically an index on FK columns. Oct 28 '11 at 19:52
  • So it isn't a rule ? I mean, there could be RDBMS that won't create index on FK columns automatically ?
    – xx77aBs
    Oct 29 '11 at 10:16
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KEY is a synonym for INDEX, so that is creating an index on the other_id column.

The only difference in the foreign key construction is that the latter constraint version allows you to name the constraint, whereas the former will be given a system generated name.

This name can be seen in the INFORMATION_SCHEMA TABLE_CONSTRAINTS table.

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