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Let me start with what I'm really trying to do. We want a platform independent startup script for invoking a JVM with some system properties and a dynamically generated classpath. We picked Jython in particular because we only need to depend on the standalone jython.jar in our startup script. We decided we could write a jython script that uses subprocess.Popen to launch our application's jvm and then terminates.

One more thing. Our application uses a lot of legacy debug code that prints to standard out. So the startup script typically has been redirecting stdout/stderr to a log file. I attempted to reproduce that with our jython script like this:

subprocess.Popen(args,stdout=logFile,stderr=logFile)

After this line the launcher script and hosting jvm for jython terminates. The problem is nothing shows up in the logFile. If I instead do this:

subprocess.Popen(args,stdout=logFile,stderr=logFile).wait()

then we get logs. So the parent process needs to run parallel to the application process launched via subprocess? I want to avoid having two running jvms.

Can you invoke subprocess in such a way that the stdout file will be written even if the parent process terminates? Is there a better way to launch the application jvm from jython? Is Jython a bad solution anyway?

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We want a platform independent startup script for invoking a JVM with some system properties and a dynamically generated classpath.

You could use a platform independent script to generate a platform specific startup script either at installation time or before each invocation. In the latter case, additionally, you need a simple static platform specific script that invokes your platform independent startup-script-generating script and then the generated script itself. In both cases you start your application by calling a static platform specific script.

Can you invoke subprocess in such a way that the stdout file will be written even if the parent process terminates?

You could open file/redirect in a child process e.g., using shell:

Popen(' '.join(args+['>', 'logFile', '2>&1']), # shell specific cmdline
      shell=True) # on Windows see _cmdline2list to understand what is going on
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  • Thanks! Using shell=True and piping the output worked. Now my only problem is that startup is pretty slow considering I'm bringing up a jvm just to run a startup script for bringing up a jvm. Your first option would fix that, but I'm not sure how you would go about doing that? Are there some libraries or tools for converting some subset of python or something else to windows bat or bash scripts?
    – kenen
    Oct 28 '11 at 14:39
  • @tal: Take a look at jython' own StartScriptGenerator.java and shell scripts
    – jfs
    Oct 28 '11 at 15:50

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