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Below is an LSD Radix sort implementation in Java from a textbook to sort an array of strings where each string contains exactly W characters.

I want to count the number of array accesses during runtime. I've read that LSD sort is supposed to require n * c array accesses where n is the number of strings and c the amount of characters in each string. However, the algorithm below accesses more than one array several times. If I increment a counter at each of these I'll end up with a significant factor of nc.

So what exactly constitutes 'array access' in the context of algorithms? Is there only one instance of array access that is considered more significant that I should count here, or is this example in fact an inefficient implementation that uses more array access than necessary?

 public int lsdSort(String[] array, int W) {
  int access = 0;
  // Sort a[] on leading W characters.
  int N = array.length;
  String[] aux = new String[N];
  for (int d = W-1; d >= 0; d--)
  { // Sort by key-indexed counting on dth char.
    int[] count = new int[R+1]; // Compute frequency counts.
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        count[array[i].charAt(d) + 1]++;
    }
    for (int r = 0; r < R; r++) {
        // Transform counts to indices.
        count[r+1] += count[r];
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        // Distribute.
        aux[count[array[i].charAt(d)]++] = array[i];

    }  
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) // Copy back.
        array[i] = aux[i];
  }

  return access;
  }
  • Thanks to Yuval for the small edits that improved readability! – Lawyerson Oct 27 '11 at 22:58
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I've read that LSD sort is supposed to require n times c array accesses where n is the number of strings and c the amount of characters in each string.

Are you sure you haven't read that it's O(nc)? That's not the same thing at all. It's big-O notation. The point isn't to determine the exact number of array accesses - it's to talk about how it grows (or rather, the limit of how it can grow) as n or c increase. In this case it increases linearly - if you increase n by a factor of 1000, you would only expect the total cost to grow by a factor of 1000 too... whereas if it were an O(n2c) algorithm instead, it might grow by a factor of 1,000,000. (Strictly speaking any O(nc) algorithm is also O(n2c) due to it only being a limit, but let's not get into that.)

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  • Thank you for your answer. This seems to make sense. I have only recently started studying algorithms and I'm familiar with the big-O notation. My textbook however makes it seem as if Radix sort is supposed to only need exactly c array accesses for each string n despite offering this implementation example, which confused me. – Lawyerson Oct 27 '11 at 22:43
  • Though I don't really see any reason why nc shouldn't be doable. You just need c loops iterating through the array and putting values into the helper array. Well ok you can argue that's 2nc as we have to write the characters back, but different array ;-) – Voo Oct 27 '11 at 22:44
  • @Parusa: It's possible that that's really what it means, and it really is possible. It seems less interesting than the big-O bit though. – Jon Skeet Oct 27 '11 at 22:46
  • @JonSkeet I guess the book is simply trying to tell me (albeit in a confusing manner) that Radix sorts can sort in linear time, and that it actually can do this in strictly c.n, but that actual efficiency depends on the implementation. Thank you for your time! – Lawyerson Oct 27 '11 at 22:53
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All the array accesses inside the first for loop are essentially counted as a combined number of array accesses, so that's your c. The n is how many times you do these combined array accesses. This gives you an approximate idea of the growth of the function, not the actual count of accesses.

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1
public int lsdSort(String[] array, int W) {
  int access = 0;
  // Sort a[] on leading W characters.
  int N = array.length;
  String[] aux = new String[N];
  for (int d = W-1; d >= 0; d--)
  { // Sort by key-indexed counting on dth char.
    int[] count = new int[R+1]; // Compute frequency counts.
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        count[array[i].charAt(d) + 1]++;
        access++;
        access++;
    }
    for (int r = 0; r < R; r++) {
        // Transform counts to indices.
        count[r+1] += count[r];
        access++;
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        // Distribute.
        aux[count[array[i].charAt(d)]++] = array[i];
        access++; 
        access++;
        access++;   
    }  
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) // Copy back.
        array[i] = aux[i];
        access++;
        access++;
  }

  return access;

  }

an array 'access' is either a read or a write...

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  • +1 for the example. I hadn't considered incrementing several times within the same loop. Thank you for your answer! – Lawyerson Oct 27 '11 at 22:55
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In Big-O asymptotic notation, the number of access are proportional to a constant. When you analyze the code, all the constants are discarded.

In the case of Radix Sort the Big O is O(cn). But if you want to actually count how many times the array is accessed you need to multiply that number for some constant k, where that k is specific to the concrete coded implementation.

For example, this function is O(n) but the number of times the array is accessed is 2n: one for reading the value, and one for updating it. The number 2 is discarded.

for (i=0; i<N; i++)
   A[i] = A[i] + 1;
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