7

Apologies for such a basic question but I can't figure it out. I know you can initialize a class like this:

QFile file("C:\\example");

But how would you initialize it from a global variable? For example:

QFile file; //QFile class

int main()
{
    file = ?? //need to initialize 'file' with the QFile class
}
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  • Global variables are a bad idea, by the way. – Etienne de Martel Oct 27 '11 at 23:27
  • You don't initialize a class, you initialize an instance. And please think about why you would need a global variable in the first place, because commonly, you don't. – Fred Foo Oct 27 '11 at 23:27
14

1. Straightforward answer

If the class is assignable/copy constructible you can just write

QFile file; //QFile class

int main()
{
    file = QFile("C:\\example");
}

2. Use indirection

If not, you'll have to resort to other options:

QFile* file = 0;

int main()
{
    file = new QFile("C:\\example");

    //
    delete file;
}

Or use boost::optional<QFile>, std::shared_ptr<QFile>, boost::scoped_ptr<QFile> etc.

3. Use singleton-related patterns:

Due to the Static Initialization Fiasco you could want to write such a function:

static QFile& getFile()
{ 
    static QFile s_file("C:\\example"); // initialized once due to being static
    return s_file;
}

C++11 made such a function-local static initialization thread safe as well (quoting the C++0x draft n3242, §6.7:)

enter image description here

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  • There's no such thing as std::scoped_ptr, Mr I-look-like-30k ;-) – Kerrek SB Oct 27 '11 at 23:29
  • Shute :) I was typing boost::shared_ptr, edited to std::shared_ptr, then thought better of it and changed to scoped_ptr :) Thanks for the heads up! – sehe Oct 27 '11 at 23:32
  • +1 for covering number of solutions and aspects. Citation or paragraph number to the referenced spec in C++11 would be nice. – mloskot Oct 27 '11 at 23:37
  • 2
    @mloskot: standard reference added – sehe Oct 27 '11 at 23:46
  • @sehe Hehe, big effort, thanks. Paragraph number would do well too. – mloskot Oct 28 '11 at 0:03
4

The same way:

// file.cpp

QFile file("C:\\example");

int main()
{
  // use `file`
}

The constructors of all global objects execute before main() is invoked (and inversely for destructors).

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  • Which is the correct answer (for non C++1y). If you have no trivial initializer for the class, then this is the only possible way of doing this. – mousomer Feb 10 '15 at 14:17
2
#include <iostream>
struct QFile
{
    char const* name;
    QFile(char const* name) : name(name) {}
};

QFile file("test.dat"); // global object

int main()
{
    std::cout << file.name << std::endl;
}

By the way, you wrote:

I know you can initialize a class

You can not initialize a class. You create and initialize object, not a class.

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1

It is totally up to you to decide whether you use a global variable or some thing else.

For a global variable you can define it in globally in the file and then initialize it in function as below, make sure that you write copy constructor properly.

QFile file; //class object

int main()
{
    file = QFile("C:\\example"); //create a temporary object and copy it to `file`
}

But, it is better if you use global pointer,

QFile *file;

int main()
{
    file = new QFile("C:\\example");
}

Note, if you are using this global variable only within the file, you can make it a static variable. Then it is limited to file itself. So you can minimize the bad of global variables.

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