23

I am trying to understand numpy's nonzero function. The following is an example application:

import numpy
arr = numpy.array([[1,0],[1,1]])
arr.nonzero()
--> (array([0, 1, 1]), array([0, 0, 1]))

I can see that because arr is 2-D, the output of nonzero() is a 2-tuple. However, I do not understand why the number of indices in each element of the tuple exceeds the number of rows/columns of the array. I can see that

arr[arr.nonzero()]
--> array([1, 1, 1])

But how...?

30

Each element of the tuple contains one of the indices for each nonzero value. Therefore, the length of each tuple element is the number of nonzeros in the array.

From your example, the indices of the nonzeros are [0, 0], [1, 0], and [1, 1]. The first element of the tuple is the first index for each of the nonzero values: ([0, 1, 1]), and the second element of the tuple is the second index for each of the nonzero values: ([0, 0, 1]).

Your second code block just returns the nonzero values of the array (I am not clear from the question if the return value is part of the confusion).

>>> arr[arr.nonzero()]
array([1, 1, 1])

This is more clear if we use an example array with other values.

>>> arr = numpy.array([[1,0],[2,3]])
>>> arr[arr.nonzero()]
array([1, 2, 3])
  • 4
    Ah, so seeing it as [0, 0], [1, 0], and [1, 1] makes sense. so zip(arr.nonzero()) are meant to return these paired indices. – hatmatrix Oct 28 '11 at 2:27
  • Ok, so the length of the arrays in the returned tuple is equal to the number of non-zero values that are in the orig array. And the number of arrays in the returned tuple is equal to the number of dimensions in the orig array. And if I zipped the result of arr.nonzero(), I'd get an array of indices for non-zero elements. I think that's also what np.transpose(np.nonzero(arr) returns: an array of indices for the non-zero values in arr. I like your example of arr[arr.nonzero()] to obtain an array of the non-zero values themselves. – SherylHohman Jun 16 '17 at 14:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.