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The output I got is like this:

number of bags ordered : 43 ($236.50)

discount : 5% ($11.83)

total cost : $224.68

that correct total cost should be 224.67 because 236.50 - 11.83 = 224.67

the discount I got using %.2f shows 11.83 where the original value is 11.825

total cost = bags ordered - discount

224.68 != 236.50 - 11.825 = 224.675

and just because I got a round up value and I don't want 224.68 but 224.67.

how to ensure that it's 236.50-11.83=224.67 but not 236.50-11.825=224.675??

someone please help me with this ><

thankyou :)

  • .2f suggests floating point arithmetic which cannot be accurate. – Scorpion Oct 28 '11 at 5:23
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Don't use floating-point numbers for currency calculations -- use decimal classes!

| improve this answer | |
  • currently, my lesson haven cover till BigDecimal. i've got no idea using that in my coding D: any other ideas? – Pei Pei Oct 28 '11 at 5:43
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You might want to consider switching to the BigDecimal class. The setScale(int newScale, RoundingMode roundingMode) function can give you full control over the decimal places.

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  • currently, my lesson haven cover till BigDecimal. i've got no idea using that in my coding D: any other ideas? – Pei Pei Oct 28 '11 at 5:58
  • chances are that nobody will ever teach a class on BigDecimal... If you go through the page on the link or if you just google it you'll find lots of information and examples about it. – Marsellus Wallace Oct 28 '11 at 16:22
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Floating point arithmetic is evil for fixed decimals like one in currency. Just use integers and format the output so that you have 2 digits separated with a ., that will save you a lot of headaches.

If you really want to keep floats you should do some tricks with rounding and multiply/divide so that you actually do the same rounding done by printing, e.g.:

  • 11.825 * 100 = 1182.5
  • Math.round(1182.5) = 1183
  • 1183 / 100 = 11.83
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  • i able to make it using the second one :D but math.round() isn't in my syllabus yet=.= so do BigDecimal. so i dunno how to do it... – Pei Pei Oct 28 '11 at 5:41
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Since you have to use no other library classes, you could still implement your own rounding method.

public static float round(float val) {
   return (val*100.0 + 0.5) / 100.0;
}

to round your values before you use them in subsequent operations.

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  • However it's not accurate. Floating-point values don't actually have decimal places so trying to round or truncate to fixed numbers of decimal places is a chimera. – Marquis of Lorne Oct 29 '11 at 1:13

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