29

This was probably asked somewhere but I couldn't find it. Could someone clarify why this code compiles and prints out 1?

long i = (byte) + (char) - (int) + (long) - 1;
System.out.println(i);
  • 1
    @PrinceJohnWesley: well, it looks weird, isn't it? Even though the answer is simple, and we understood it right after I posted the question. – Denis Tulskiy Oct 28 '11 at 4:00
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    I think it looks weird; I don't have any problem believing someone would look at that and not believe it was even legal Java. – Dave Newton Oct 28 '11 at 4:02
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    long j = +-+- - -+-+ -+- + - +1; // this is also legal. As long as ++ or -- doesn't occur. – david van brink Oct 28 '11 at 4:21
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    This is explained in the original post vanillajava.blogspot.com/2011/10/java-plus.html ;) – Peter Lawrey Oct 28 '11 at 7:38
41

It's being parsed as this:

long i = (byte)( +(char)( -(int)( +(long)(-1) ) ) );

where all the + and - operators are unary + or -.

In which case, the 1 gets negated twice, so it prints out as a 1.

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5

Because both '+' and '-' are unary operators, and the casts are working on the operands of those unaries. The rest is math.

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5

Unary operators and casting :)

+1 is legal

(byte) + 1 is casting +1 to a byte.

Sneaky! Made me think.

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