2

i don't work well with C++ but now i need build a function that call Delphi DLL and pass a string to DLL and get return new string.

here is my Delphi DLL code:

library testdll;
uses
  System.Classes,Winapi.Windows,System.SysUtils;
{$R *.res}

function hello(name : PWideChar):PWideChar;
var
rs:PWideChar;
begin
  rs:=PWideChar('Hello '+rs);
  Result:=rs;
end;

exports
hello;
begin
end.

Anyone can help me create simple code in C++ to call and get result form hello function, thank for help.

5

You are trying to concat a PWideChar to a String literal and return it as another PWideChar. That will not work as-is. You should not be returning a PWideChar anyway. That leads to memory management nightmares. A better design is to let the caller pass a buffer into the DLL to fill in instead, eg:

library testdll;

uses
  System.Classes,
  Winapi.Windows,
  System.SysUtils;

{$R *.res}

function hello(name, buffer : PWideChar; buflen: Integer): Integer; stdcall;
var
  rs: UnicodeString;
begin
  rs := 'Hello '+UnicodeString(name);
  if buffer = nil then
  begin
    Result := Length(rs) + 1;
  end else
  begin
    Result := Min(buflen, Length(rs));
    Move(rs[1], buffer^, Result * SizeOf(WideChar));
  end;
end;

exports
  hello;

begin
end.

Then, given this C++ declaration::

int __stdcall hello(wchar_t* name, wchar_t* buffer, int buflen);

You can call it all kinds of different ways, depending on your needs:

wchar_t str[256];
int len = hello(L"joe", str, 255);
str[len] = 0;
...

int len = hello(L"joe", NULL, 0);
wchar_t *str = new wchar_t[len];
len = hello(L"joe", str, len);
str[len] = 0;
...
delete[] str;

int len = hello(L"joe", NULL, 0);
std::wstring str(len-1);
str.resize(hello(L"joe", &str[0], len));
...

int len = hello(L"joe", NULL, 0);
UnicodeString str;
str.SetLength(len-1);
str.SetLength(hello(L"joe", str.c_str(), len));
...

The same kind of code can be translated to Pascal very easily if you ever need to use the same DLL in Delphi:

function hello(name, buffer: PWideChar, buflen: Integer): Integer; stdcall; extern 'testdll.dll';


var
  str: array[0..255] of WideChar;
  len: Integer;
begin
  len := hello('joe', str, 255);
  str[len] := #0;
  ...
end;


var
  str; PWideChar
  len; Integer;
begin
  len := hello('joe', nil, 0);
  GetMem(str, len];
  len := hello('joe', str, len);
  str[len] := #0;
  ...
  FreeMem(str);
end;


var
  str; UnicodeString;
  len; Integer;
begin
  len := hello('joe', nil, 0);
  SetLength(str, len-1);
  SetLength(str, hello('joe', PWideChar(str), len));
  ...
end;
2
  • A more consistent way (with Windows APIs, anyway) is to use the return value as a success/error indicator, and use the buflen parameter (which should be var) to indicate the required buffer length. – Ondrej Kelle Oct 28 '11 at 8:48
  • Perhaps. On the other hand, having the function return a negative value for the length value serves the same purpose. – Remy Lebeau Oct 28 '11 at 10:33
3

Update It turns out that Delphi uses a non-standard calling convention for WideString return values. So the code below won't work. The basic concept is sound but you need to return BSTR or use an out parameter of type WideString. More details here: Why can a WideString not be used as a function return value for interop?


Remy's approach is good so long as the caller knows how big a buffer to allocate. An alternative approach is to allocate memory in the DLL and have the caller free the memory. This only works if both parties use the same allocator. An example of a shared allocator is the COM allocator and COM BSTR of course uses this. In Delphi a BSTR maps to WideString which gives us the following approach.

Delphi

function concat(s1, s2: PWideChar): WideString; stdcall;
begin
  Result := s1 + s2;
end;

C++

// DLL import
BSTR __stdcall concat(wchar_t *s1, wchar_t *s2);

BSTR bstr_res = concat(L"Wello, ", L"world!");
std::wstring res(bstr_res);
SysFreeString(bstr_res);

Obviously in this simple example, the required buffer size for the concatenated string is simple to calculate. But if the actual function in the DLL was more complex then this approach would become more obviously advantageous.

4
  • 1
    The DLL function can be implemented to inform the caller about the buffer size needed, as is usually done by Windows APIs. The caller would call the function twice: first with nil buffer, to receive required buffer size, then it would allocate big enough buffer and call it a second time. – Ondrej Kelle Oct 28 '11 at 8:46
  • @TOndrej Yes, but that can sometimes be very inconvenient. For example if it is expensive, or destructive to compute the string being returned, having to do so twice is no good. I'm a big fan of a common allocator. It makes life very easy indeed. You can see from the volumes of code which is simpler to code. – David Heffernan Oct 28 '11 at 8:49
  • 1
    @David: BSTR/WideString is not very efficient, though, in part because it has to be managed by the OS. It is generally better to allocate memory from the RTL's memory manager instead. Just export an extra function from the DLL that the caller can use to let the DLL deallocate memory that it previously allocated. For instance, using GetMem() and FreeMem(), or StrAlloc() and StrDispose(). – Remy Lebeau Oct 28 '11 at 10:31
  • 1
    @remy that smacks of premature optimization – David Heffernan Oct 28 '11 at 10:38

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