1

As I understand it, ordinarily in XSL each node may only be affected by one template. Once a node has been affected by a template, it - and, crucially, its children/descendents - are not affected further by any other templates.

Sometimes, though, you want to affect an outer node with one template, then affect its children/descendents with another template. Would the following be an advisable way round this? Its aim is to add the attribute 'attr' to each node.

Source XML: <root> <child> <grandchild> <greatgrandchild>hello! </grandchild> </child> </root>

XSL:

    <xsl:template match='node()'>
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match='child'>
        <child>
            <xsl:attribute name='attr'>val</xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:apply-templates select='./*' />
        </child>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match='greatgrandchild'>
        <greatgrandchild>
            <xsl:attribute name='attr'>val</xsl:attribute>
            <xsl:value-of select='.' />
        </greatgrandchild>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Am I on the right lines?

Thanks in advance.

0

Frankly whether a node is processed depends entirely on your templates and the built-in templates (which can be overridden). If a template for a foo element nodes does <xsl:apply-templates/> then the child nodes are processed, if it does <xsl:apply-templates select="ancestor::*"/> then its ancestor elements are processed, just to give two examples. Of course if you write a template for a certain element that does not use apply-templates for further processing then processing stops.

As for your sample, if you want to add an attribute to all element nodes then all you need is

<xsl:template match="@* | node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@* | node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="*">
  <xsl:copy>
   <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
   <xsl:attribute name="attr">val</xsl:attribute>
   <xsl:apply-templates/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

That the identity transformation template plus one for element nodes adding the new attribute.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks a lot. A few questions: 1) Does the first template not match the root? If so, why have '@* | node()' rather than just '/'? 2) Could you explain what's happening in the second template? 3) My original XSL had only one xsl:copy - after that, nodes were created by hand (<child> etc). How come yours has an xsl:copy in each template? Thanks for patience - the idea of XSL creating XML rather than HTML is a bit new for me. – user736788 Oct 28 '11 at 10:20
  • The first template matches attribute nodes (with @*) and all types of nodes matched by node() which are element nodes, comment nodes, processing instruction nodes, text nodes (or to describe it the other way round "node() matches any node other than an attribute node and the root node"). There does not have to be a template with match="/" as that is built-in. As for the approach with two templates, the first one alone copies nodes node by node, level by level. It serves as a starting approach for stylesheets where you selectively want to add/remove/change nodes by adding templates. – Martin Honnen Oct 28 '11 at 11:43
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As I understand it, ordinarily in XSL each node may only be affected by one template. Once a node has been affected by a template, it - and, crucially, its children/descendents - are not affected further by any other templates.

None of these statements are true. Different templates may be selected for execution on the same node -- this all depends on the <xsl:apply-templates> instructions that result in selecting a particular template for execution. There is a great flexibility in how templates can be applied and selected, such as import precedence, priority, modes, ..., etc.

It is even possible to make templates dual to nodes (used as a node), as is done in FXSL.

Sometimes, though, you want to affect an outer node with one template, then affect its children/descendents with another template. Would the following be an advisable way round this? Its aim is to add the attribute 'attr' to each node.

This is trivially achieved using the most fundamental XSLT design pattern -- overriding the identity rule:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
     <xsl:copy>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
     </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="*">
  <xsl:variable name="val" select="count(ancestor::node())"/>
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:attribute name="depth">
      <xsl:value-of select="$val"/>
    </xsl:attribute>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
  </xsl:copy>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document (corrected to be made well-formed):

<root>
    <child>
        <grandchild>
            <greatgrandchild>hello! </greatgrandchild>
        </grandchild>
    </child>
</root>

it copies every node and adds a depth attribute to every element. The value of the newly-added attribute is the "depth" of the element:

<root depth="1">
   <child depth="2">
      <grandchild depth="3">
         <greatgrandchild depth="4">hello! </greatgrandchild>
      </grandchild>
   </child>
</root>
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, Dimitre. I did say "as I understand it" :) Learning all the time. – user736788 Oct 28 '11 at 14:38

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