1

I have a view that has an INSTEAD OF INSERT trigger (in SQL Server 2005). When the user inserts into the view, they are in fact making inserts and updates to a number of tables. The view is sufficiently complex that it cannot have an index, so is unfortunately unconstrained.

The view is being inserted into from C# using code that would be problematic to change. This code catches primary and unique key violations using the following:

try
{
    ... // Insert into view
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    if (ex.Number == 2627 || ex.Number == 2601) // Primary key exception, unique constraint violation
    {
        ... // Report the duplicate entry to the user
    }
    else
    {
        throw;
    }
}

So my question is: can I use RAISERROR within my trigger to create an exception with number 2627 or 2601?

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1

No. You'll have to wait for THROW in the next release (maybe)

You can only throw errors that you have put into sys.messages (50000+), or with text that gives 50000. Or embed it in the text and change your c#. You can't throw errors less than 50000

If the view is so complex that you can't use DRI, then it is too complex. Also, you'll have concurrency issues: overlapping calls will break your "uniqueness" at some point when you roll your own.

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  • Thanks, fair enough. My understanding is that schema-bound views can only be indexed in SQL Server 2005 if they have no left joins, no unions, and no sub-queries. In my opinion, these do not necessarily make a view too complex. – Paul Oct 28 '11 at 10:39
  • @Paul: they do because maintaining an indexed view would require a lot of processing with these constructs. See "Why can't I use OUTER JOIN in an indexed view?" in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd171921%28SQL.100%29.aspx – gbn Oct 28 '11 at 10:45
  • Sorry, I meant too complex to be useful as a view, not too complex for SQL Server to maintain an index upon. In my case, the view does not have outer joins, but has a subquery so that I can restrict based on the result of the ROW_NUMBER() function. – Paul Oct 28 '11 at 10:55
  • @Paul: ROW_NUMBER() would require the whole indexed view to be recalculated (change of place/removal in ORDER BY, change of partition etc). There are good reasons for the limits on indexed views. – gbn Oct 28 '11 at 11:13
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I'm not sure if you can actually RAISE a genuine primary key violation. Though you can RAISE your own error with your own message and then catch that. This will also allow you to distinguish between a genuine primary key violation and your own custom violations.

Perhaps the crudest way to accomplish this would be...

SQL Code (in TRIGGER definition maybe)...

RAISERROR('Custom View Violation',16,1);

C#...

try 
{
    //execute SP / Insert etc...
}
catch (SqlException ex)
{
    if (ex.Message.Split('\r')[0] == "Custom View Violation")
    {
        //deal with your exception
    }
}
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  • Thanks...that may well be what I need to do if raising a primary key error cannot be done. Alternatively, I could cause a genuine primary key violation by inserting two identical values into a temporary table with a primary key...both seem a little hacky though :-S – Paul Oct 28 '11 at 10:42
  • @Paul yeah they are a little hacky - though I would say that the method in my post is less hacky than the double INSERT you propose. I'm also sure there is a better way of RAISE ing the error and catching your specific exception so probably best to read-up on the ins-and-outs of RAISERROR. – El Ronnoco Oct 28 '11 at 11:05
  • Yes, agreed. [and some more characters] – Paul Oct 28 '11 at 11:08

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