11

I want to test if a list contains consecutive integers.

 consQ[a_] := Module[
  {ret = True}, 
  Do[If[i > 1 && a[[i]] != a[[i - 1]] + 1, ret = False; Break[]], {i, 
  1, Length[a]}]; ret]

Although the function consQ does the job, I wonder if there is a better ( shorter, faster ) method of doing this, preferably using functional programming style.

EDIT: The function above maps lists with consecutive integers in decreasing sequence to False. I would like to change this to True.

9

You could use

consQ[a_List ? (VectorQ[#, IntegerQ]&)] := Union@Differences[a] === {1}
consQ[_] = False

You may want to remove the test for integers if you know that every list you pass to it will only have integers.

EDIT: A little extra: if you use a very old version that doesn't have Differences, or wonder how to implement it,

differences[a_List] := Rest[a] - Most[a]

EDIT 2: The requested change:

consQ[a : {Integer___}] := MatchQ[Union@Differences[a], {1} | {-1} | {}]
consQ[_] = False

This works with both increasing and decreasing sequences, and gives True for a list of size 1 or 0 as well.

More generally, you can test if the list of numbers are equally spaced with something like equallySpacedQ[a_List] := Length@Union@Differences[a] == 1

  • Since you're testing that the set of difference is exactly {1}, it's sufficient to check that the list contains one integer, instead of checking all of them. – Brett Champion Oct 28 '11 at 16:18
  • Or without the integrity-constraints : consQ[a_] := Union@Differences[a] === {1}. Cool. It's hard to choose between your solution and the one by Champion. - ( I was not aware Mathematica had the Differences function. ) – nilo de roock Oct 28 '11 at 19:56
  • Please have a look at EDIT: and further in question. How would you modify your consQ? – nilo de roock Oct 28 '11 at 20:39
  • Thanks for the edit. @Szabolcs - I like your answer for its readability, compactness and functional style, even though technically it might not be the fastest. - The variety in solutions show the power of Mathematica. – nilo de roock Oct 29 '11 at 11:50
11

Szablics' solution is probably what I'd do, but here's an alternative:

consQ[a : {___Integer}] := Most[a] + 1 === Rest[a]
consQ[_] := False

Note that these approaches differ in how they handle the empty list.

  • and also the list of size 1. I like yours better. – Szabolcs Oct 28 '11 at 16:18
  • Fast, functional and compact. :-) But cryptic ( to me ), where Union@Differences is close to self-documenting. - It's hard to decide which one is the best! - Both leave my 'solution' far behind performance-wise. – nilo de roock Oct 28 '11 at 20:01
  • But easily broken down. Set a = {1,2,3,4,5} and go from there. – Brett Champion Oct 28 '11 at 20:18
  • Please have a look at EDIT: and further in question. How would you modify your consQ? – nilo de roock Oct 28 '11 at 20:39
  • 2
    @nilo, you can follow belisarius' lead and use Sign: Most[a] + Sign[a[[2]]-a[[1]]] === Rest[a] – Mr.Wizard Oct 29 '11 at 1:54
8

I think the following is also fast, and comparing reversed lists does not take longer:

a = Range[10^7];
f[a_] := Range[Sequence @@ ##, Sign[-#[[1]] + #[[2]]]] &@{a[[1]], a[[-1]]} == a;
Timing[f[a]]
b = Reverse@a;
Timing[f[b]]

Edit

A short test for the fastests solutions so far:

a = Range[2 10^7];
Timing@consQSzab@a
Timing@consQBret@a
Timing@consQBeli@a
(*
{6.5,True}
{0.703,True}
{0.203,True}
*)
8

I like the solutions by the other two, but I'd be concerned about very long lists. Consider the data

d:dat[n_Integer?Positive]:= d = {1}~Join~Range[1, n]

which has its non-sequential point at the very beginning. Setting consQ1 for Brett's and consQ2 for Szabolcs, I get

AbsoluteTiming[ #[dat[ 10000 ] ]& /@ {consQ1, consQ2}
{ {0.000110, False}, {0.001091, False} }

Or, roughly a ten times difference between the two, which stays relatively consistent with multiple trials. This time can be cut in roughly half by short-circuiting the process using NestWhile:

Clear[consQ3]
consQ3[a : {__Integer}] := 
 Module[{l = Length[a], i = 1},
   NestWhile[# + 1 &, i, 
      (#2 <= l) && a[[#1]] + 1 == a[[#2]] &, 
   2] > l
 ]

which tests each pair and only continues if they return true. The timings

AbsoluteTiming[consQ3[dat[ 10000 ]]]
{0.000059, False}

with

{0.000076, False}

for consQ. So, Brett's answer is fairly close, but occasionally, it will take twice as long.

Edit: I moved the graphs of the timing data to a Community Wiki answer.

  • I am not a timing expert but isn't Timing the function to choose when comparing sec algorithm speeds? - I ask because I get different results when using Timing instead of AbsoluteTiming. - I am interested which solution uses the fastest algorithm. – nilo de roock Oct 28 '11 at 19:53
  • @niloderoock, I added timing data, using Timing to my answer. – rcollyer Oct 28 '11 at 23:27
  • @rcollyer Do you mind to include mine? – Dr. belisarius Oct 29 '11 at 3:09
  • @belisarius, absolutely. Give me a couple of hours. – rcollyer Oct 29 '11 at 12:33
  • 1
    @belisarius, so do I, see my wiki answer. – rcollyer Oct 29 '11 at 17:10
5

Fold can be used in a fairly concise expression that runs very quickly:

consQFold[a_] := (Fold[If[#2 == #1 + 1, #2, Return[False]] &, a[[1]]-1, a]; True)

Pattern-matching can be used to provide a very clear expression of intent at the cost of substantially slower performance:

consQMatch[{___, i_, j_, ___}] /; j - i != 1 := False
consQMatch[_] = True;

Edit

consQFold, as written, works in Mathematica v8.0.4 but not in earlier versions of v8 or v7. To correct this problem, there are a couple of alternatives. The first is to explicitly name the Return point:

consQFold[a_] :=
  (Fold[If[#2==#1+1, #2, Return[False,CompoundExpression]] &, a[[1]]-1, a]; True)

The second, as suggested by @Mr.Wizard, is to replace Return with Throw / Catch:

consQFold[a_] :=
  Catch[Fold[If[#2 == #1 + 1, #2, Throw[False]]&, a[[1]]-1, a]; True]
  • this is what I thought of when I read the question, but don't you mean to use Throw rather than Return? – Mr.Wizard Oct 29 '11 at 1:19
  • @Mr.Wizard Throw would work as well, but it would require a corresponding Catch. Return is therefore more concise as it exits the nearest enclosing construct (in this case, the definition of consQFold). – WReach Oct 29 '11 at 3:18
  • It does? Are you sure? – Mr.Wizard Oct 29 '11 at 3:21
  • @Mr.Wizard Aha! I see the problem now. Return appears to be broken in version 7 and version 8.0.1. It is fixed again in version 8.0.4 (or broken, depending upon your viewpoint :). – WReach Oct 29 '11 at 3:25
  • 7
    @Mr.Wizard There seems to be a lot of lore surrounding Return -- and few facts. The official documentation is sparse. For example, the two-argument form is almost undocumented. I've been surprised more than once by the documented behaviour: If [the second argument] is omitted, the affected function or loop is determined using built-in heuristics. I suppose I should have known better than to rely on it and I had the (mis)fortune of trying out my code in the shiny new 8.0.4. – WReach Oct 29 '11 at 4:06
5

Since the timing seems to be rather important. I've moved the comparisons between the various methods to this, Community Wiki, answer.

The data used are simply lists of consecutive integers, with a single non-consecutive point, and they're generated via

d : dat[n_Integer?Positive] := (d = {1}~Join~Range[1, n])
d : dat[n_Integer?Positive, p_Integer?Positive] /; p <= n := 
     Range[1, p]~Join~{p}~Join~Range[p + 1, n]

where the first form of dat[n] is equivalent to dat[n, 1]. The timing code is simple:

Clear[consQTiming]
Options[consQTiming] = {
   NonConsecutivePoints -> {10, 25, 50, 100, 250,500, 1000}};
consQTiming[fcns__, OptionPattern[]]:=
With[{rnd = RandomInteger[{1, #}, 100]}, 
  With[{fcn = #}, 
     Timing[ fcn[dat[10000, #]] & /@ rnd ][[1]]/100
  ] & /@ {fcns}
] & /@ OptionValue[NonConsecutivePoints]

It generates 100 random integers between 1 and each of {10, 25, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000} and dat then uses each of those random numbers as the non-consecutive point in a list 10,000 elements long. Each consQ implementation is then applied to each list produced by dat, and the results are averaged. The plotting function is simply

Clear[PlotConsQTimings]
Options[PlotConsQTimings] = {
     NonConsecutivePoints -> {10, 25, 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000}};
PlotConsQTimings[timings : { _?VectorQ ..}, OptionPattern[]] :=
  ListLogLogPlot[
    Thread[{OptionValue[NonConsecutivePoints], #}] & /@ Transpose[timings],
    Frame -> True, Joined -> True, PlotMarkers -> Automatic
  ]

timing data for various functions

I timed the following functions consQSzabolcs1, consQSzabolcs2, consQBrett, consQRCollyer, consQBelisarius, consQWRFold, consQWRFold2, consQWRFold3, consQWRMatch, and MrWizard's version of consQBelisarius.

In ascending order of the left most timing: consQBelisarius, consQWizard, consQRCollyer, consQBrett, consQSzabolcs1, consQWRMatch, consQSzabolcs2, consQWRFold2, consQWRFold3,and consQWRFold.

Edit: Reran all of the functions with timeAvg (the second one) instead of Timing in consQTiming. I did still average over 100 runs, though. For the most part, there was any change, except for the lowest two where there is some variation from run to run. So, take those two lines with a grain of salt as they're timings are practically identical.

enter image description here

  • Thanks @rcollyer :) – Dr. belisarius Oct 29 '11 at 17:14
  • Which one is consQWizard ? – Dr. belisarius Oct 29 '11 at 17:24
  • @belisarius, pushed it out to allow random non-consecutive points out to 5000 and 10000, and updated picture. – rcollyer Oct 29 '11 at 17:29
  • @belisarius, the one right above yours, which dips below yours between 50 and 1000. – rcollyer Oct 29 '11 at 17:30
  • yes, but which function is it? There are two functions in Mr's answer – Dr. belisarius Oct 29 '11 at 18:02
5

I am now convinced that belisarius is trying to get my goat by writing intentionally convoluted code. :-p

I would write: f = Range[##, Sign[#2 - #]]& @@ #[[{1, -1}]] == # &

Also, I believe that WReach probably intended to write something like:

consQFold[a_] := 
 Catch[
  Fold[If[#2 === # + 1, #2, Throw@False] &, a[[1]] - 1, a]; 
  True
 ]
  • 3
    -14 for reverse engineering my copyrighted and obfuscated code – Dr. belisarius Oct 29 '11 at 3:11
  • 1
    There's a wine for your goat problem. – rcollyer Oct 29 '11 at 17:51

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