2

I'm attempting to condense several SQL calls into one, and wanted to know if the following were possible.

Here are are my tables.

Organization
    id

Event
    id,
    startDate
    endDate

FavoriteOrgs
    userId
    orgId

For each day of the month, I want to return a count of the events occurring on that day. Not too difficult, until you add the fact that events can span 2 or 3 days.

Here's what I have so far, which accurately shows event counts by day, but it only includes the event in count for the day it begins.

SELECT DAYOFMONTH( CAST( o.start_date AS DATE ) ) AS dayNum, COUNT( * ) AS count
    FROM favoriteOrgs f, event e, organization o
    WHERE f.user_id =200372
    AND e.profile_id = o.id AND e.profile_id = f.profile_id AND o.id = f.profile_id
    AND e.last_date >=  '$startDate'
    AND e.start_date <=  '$lastDate'
    GROUP BY e.start_date
  • Can you post your schema – hafichuk Oct 28 '11 at 18:19
  • I posted it in the question, but here it is again: organization(id); event(id, startDate, endDate); favoriteOrgs(userId, orgId) – Jeremy Penrod Oct 28 '11 at 18:24
  • Thats not a schema. I don't know what that is. In your mysql client run 'DESC organization', etc. See dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/describe.html. – hafichuk Oct 28 '11 at 18:32
  • Ah. ID's are ints. startDate and endDate are timestamps. – Jeremy Penrod Oct 28 '11 at 19:13
3

Your data model isn't actually modeling all of the entities in your system. One entity is the dates for which you are interested in reporting things.

You should add a table to your database (or use a temporary table, inline table, or whatever else is available with MySQL). The table is simply all of the relevant dates. Even a table that goes back to 1900 and forward to 2100 is going to be fairly small.

The query then becomes trivial:

CREATE TABLE Calendar (
    calendar_date DATE NOT NULL,
    CONSTRAINT PK_Calendar PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED
)

SELECT
    C.calendar_date,
    COUNT(*) AS count
FROM
    favoriteOrgs F
INNER JOIN Event E ON
    E.profile_id = F.profile_id AND
    E.last_date >= '$startDate' AND
    E.start_date <= '$lastDate'
INNER JOIN Organization O ON
    O.id = F.profile_id AND
    O.id = E.profile_id
WHERE
    F.user_id = 200372
GROUP BY
    C.calendar_date

You also now have an advantage that you can add additional business specific information to calendar dates, like an "is_holiday" column, "economic_quarter" or whatever. Just remember to prefill the table, which is a simple loop that you have to run once.

| improve this answer | |
  • Wow. Excellent response, thank you. Forgive my inexperience here, but currently the 'opportunity' table's 'startDate' and 'endDate' columns are timestamps - as opportunities have start and end times as well as dates. Is there a way to utilize this solution with timestamps? – Jeremy Penrod Oct 28 '11 at 19:10
  • If you only want it broken down by day then I don't think that the code is any different. I'm a MS SQL person though and they have a screwy TIMESTAMP data type, so I'm not sure how MySQL handles it. If you want it broken down by hour or something then you can just JOIN in a generated set of numbers from 1 to 24 and bucket based on those along with the dates. The key is thinking of your set of buckets as a dataset itself. – Tom H Oct 28 '11 at 20:01

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.