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I have the following code in C++ and I would like to convert a integer to a const char* in order to write on a file. I tried itoa or sstream functions but it's not working.

FILE * pFile;
pFile = fopen ("myfile.txt","w");

int a = 5;

fputs (&a,pFile);
fclose (pFile);

Thanks in advance

  • 8
    "Not working" is not helpful. I assume you'd want people to tell you more than "fix it", right? – tenfour Oct 28 '11 at 21:06
4

The first parameter to fputs is a char*, so the code you show is obviously incorrect.

You say I tried itoa or sstream functions but it's not working. but those are the solutions, and there's no reason for them not to work.

int a = 5;

//the C way
FILE* pFile = fopen("myfile.txt","w");
char buffer[12];
atoi(a, buffer, 10);
fputs(buffer, pFile); 
fclose (pFile);
//or
FILE* pFile = fopen("myfile.txt","w");
fprintf(pfile, "%d", a);
fclose(pfile);

//the C++ way
std::ofstream file("myfile.txt");
std::stringstream ss;
ss << a;
file << ss.str();
//or
std::ofstream file("myfile.txt");
file << a;
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  • My error was that I was trying to manage both fputs and ofstream. Thanks a lot. – MatthewK Oct 28 '11 at 21:29
  • "Don't cross the streams!" Closest to fputs for ofstream is ofstream::write(const char_type *_Str, streamsize _Count) – Mooing Duck Oct 28 '11 at 21:42
1

Try itoa(a) it converts an i nt to a rray hence itoa

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  • there's also the opposite atoi which is for an array to an int – qwertymk Oct 28 '11 at 21:09
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    I'm more a fan of strtol for the string-to-int (long really) route. It lets me set the numeric base, and I can set base 0 to mean "figure it out from the prefix" (which lets me parse 0x1234 and such). And it gives me a pointer to the character past the end of the number, where I can try to parse units. – Mike DeSimone Oct 28 '11 at 21:18
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    itoa is not a standard function. From the documentation: "This function is not defined in ANSI-C and is not part of C++, but is supported by some compilers." – Vicky Chijwani Jun 5 '14 at 14:35
0

What's wrong with fprintf? Or snprintf and then fputs the result.

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  • 1
    Get into the habit of using snprintf instead of sprintf. – Mike DeSimone Oct 28 '11 at 21:09
0

Use type-casting. You can use boost::lexical_cast

Once in a string, you can use the c_str() member function to get a const char *

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