I have a div with two images and an h1. All of them need to be vertically aligned within the div, next to each other.

One of the images needs to be absolute positioned within the div.

What is the CSS needed for this to work on all common browsers?

<div id="header">
    <img src=".." ></img>
    <h1>testing...</h1>
    <img src="..."></img>
</div>

25 Answers 25

up vote 768 down vote accepted

Wow, this problem is popular. It's based on a misunderstanding in the vertical-align property. This excellent article explains it:

Understanding vertical-align, or "How (Not) To Vertically Center Content" by Gavin Kistner.

“How to center in CSS” is a great web tool which helps to find the necessary CSS centering attributes for different situations.


In a nutshell (and to prevent link rot):

  • Inline elements (and only inline elements) can be vertically aligned in their context via vertical-align: middle. However, the “context” isn’t the whole parent container height, it’s the height of the text line they’re in. jsfiddle example
  • For block elements, vertical alignment is harder and strongly depends on the specific situation:
    • If the inner element can have a fixed height, you can make its position absolute and specify its height, margin-top and top position. jsfiddle example
    • If the centered element consists of a single line and its parent height is fixed you can simply set the container’s line-height to fill its height. This method is quite versatile in my experience. jsfiddle example
    • … there are more such special cases.
  • 102
    The problem with the "valid" solutions (so not the vertical-align: middle) is that you have to specify a fixed height. Not very possible for Responsive Web Design. – Emilie May 14 '13 at 8:42
  • I had this structure: <div height="##px"> My Text </ div> Worked for me set the property lineHeight using the same value as used in div height property: '##px' (## because this value is dynamic in my case) thank you – patricK Aug 24 '13 at 20:00
  • 6
    This also works with inline-block and table-cell elements. If you are having issues with this, try adjusting line-height of the container element (i.e. context) since it is used in the vertical-align line box calculations. – Alex W Oct 16 '13 at 19:14
  • 4
    list of hacks..ways...etc. jsfiddle.net/techsin/FAwku/1 – Muhammad Umer May 22 '14 at 17:28
  • css-tricks.com/centering-css-complete-guide <-- some good options presented here, have found myself resorting to the table/table-cell solution most of the time though – shaunhusain Feb 21 '16 at 1:20

I used this very simple code:

HTML:

<div class="ext-box">
    <div class="int-box">
        <h2>Some txt</h2>
        <p>bla bla bla</p>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

div.ext-box { display: table; width:100%;}
div.int-box { display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; }

Obviously, whether you use a .class or an #id, the result won't change.

  • 1
    Here's a full example of all nine possibilities of alignments (top-middle-bottom and left-center-right): jsfiddle.net/webMac/0swk9hk5 – webMac May 3 at 9:34
  • This is what I ended up using. Found the jsfiddle very helpful as well. – Kavo Sep 21 at 6:50

Now that flexbox support is increasing, this CSS applied to the containing element would vertically center the contained item:

.container {        
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
}

Use the prefixed version if you also need to target Explorer 10, and old (< 4.4) Android browsers:

.container {
    display: -ms-flexbox;
    display: -webkit-flex;
    display: flex;

    -ms-flex-align: center;
    -webkit-align-items: center;
    -webkit-box-align: center;

    align-items: center;
}
  • A nice solution, thank you. Can you suggest how to make flexbox display a horizontal scrollbar, in case the inner element is bigger than the container? (I'm trying to make inner element zoomable/scrollable within the container, like canvas in powerpoint)? Is it possible at all? – Boris Burkov Nov 4 '15 at 5:18
  • Doesn't this solution work on IE8?! – Yazid Erman Feb 9 '16 at 9:23
  • 1
    @YazidErman this solution depends on flexbox so no, only IE 10 and above support or any other modern browser caniuse.com/#search=flexbox Flexbox is great where it's supported but that's not everywhere. The display table and table cell is probably the best solution really, container just needs to be table, element being centered is wrapped an element with display table cell then can just center as some other answers here point out. – shaunhusain Feb 21 '16 at 1:16

It worked for me:

.vcontainer {
    min-height: 10em;
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
  • 8
    So it's no longer "block" element? – Pacerier Oct 12 '12 at 7:57
  • 7
    Then if you want to horizontal align with margin : 0 auto, it won't work because of the display: table-cell – Ortomala Lokni Jun 30 '14 at 13:12

A technique from a friend of mine:

HTML:

<div style="height:100px; border:1px solid;">
    <p style="border:1px dotted;">I'm vertically centered.</p>
</div>

CSS:

div:before {content:" "; display:inline-block; height:100%; vertical-align:middle;}
div p {display:inline-block;}

DEMO here

All of them need to be vertically aligned within the div

Aligned how? Tops of the images aligned with the top of the text?

One of the images needs to be absolute positioned within the div.

Absolutely positioned relative to the DIV? Perhaps you could sketch out what you're looking for...?

fd has described the steps for absolute positioning, as well as adjusting the display of the H1 element such that images will appear inline with it. To that, i'll add that you can align the images by use of the vertical-align style:

#header h1 { display: inline; }
#header img { vertical-align: middle; }

...this would put the header and images together, with top edges aligned. Other alignment options exist; see the documentation. You might also find it beneficial to drop the DIV and move the images inside the H1 element - this provides semantic value to the container, and removes the need to adjust the display of the H1:

<h1 id=header">
   <img src=".." ></img>
   testing...
   <img src="..."></img>
</h1>

To position block elements to the center (works in IE9 and above), needs a wrapper div:

.vcontainer {
  position: relative;
  top: 50%;
  transform: translateY(-50%);
  -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
}
  • This method can cause elements to be blurry due to the element being placed on a “half pixel”. A solution for this is to set the perspective of the element. transform: perspective(1px) translateY(-50%); – Simon Oct 7 '17 at 2:04

Use this formula, and it will works always without cracks:

#outer {height: 400px; overflow: hidden; position: relative;}
#outer[id] {display: table; position: static;}

#middle {position: absolute; top: 50%;} /* For explorer only*/
#middle[id] {display: table-cell; vertical-align: middle; width: 100%;}

#inner {position: relative; top: -50%} /* For explorer only */
/* Optional: #inner[id] {position: static;} */
<div id="outer">
  <div id="middle">
    <div id="inner">
      any text
      any height
      any content, for example generated from DB
      everything is vertically centered
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

  • 2
    I've never seen in css this kind of selector "#outer[id]". What should that do? What if I will have class instead of id? – Alexa Adrian Feb 13 '17 at 12:17

Almost all methods needs to specify the height, but often we don't have any heights.
So here is a CSS3 3 line trick that doesn't require to know the height.

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    transform: translateY(-50%);
}

It's supported even in IE9.

with its vendor prefixes:

.element {
    position: relative;
    top: 50%;
    -webkit-transform: translateY(-50%);
    -ms-transform: translateY(-50%);
    transform: translateY(-50%);
}

Source: http://zerosixthree.se/vertical-align-anything-with-just-3-lines-of-css/

  • but this seems work only when the height of element's parent is fixed. the property 'top' with percentage value only works in the container with fixed height, correct? – ucdream May 14 '14 at 6:05
  • Yes it works only for some cases, I had problems later with this methods... The thing is to have the most possibilities as possible and as soon as you need one you test all of them until you get the good one, because all methods got things that won't works in a specific case... – Shadowbob May 14 '14 at 8:46

My trick is to put inside the div a table with 1 row and 1 column, set 100% of width and height, and the property vertical-align:middle.

<div>

    <table style="width:100%; height:100%;">
        <tr>
            <td style="vertical-align:middle;">
                BUTTON TEXT
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>

</div>

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/joan16v/sbqjnn9q/

  • 4
    This seems the best way to avoid a lot of head-scratching. I'm still confused as to why CSS doesn't have a vertical align standard. – Kokodoko Dec 11 '14 at 12:56
 .outer {
   display: flex;
   align-items: center; 
   justify-content: center;
 }
  • 3
    I think this solution is the quickest and easiest to understand. Perhaps it's because I wasn't patient enough to grok the selected answer. Flexbox all the things! – modulitos Aug 14 at 6:30

By default h1 is a block element and will render on the line after the first img, and will cause the second img to appear on the line following the block.

To stop this from occurring you can set the h1 to have inline flow behaviour:

#header > h1 { display: inline; }

As for absolutely positioning the img inside the div, you need to set the containing div to have a "known size" before this will work properly. In my experience, you also need to change the position attribute away from the default - position: relative works for me:

#header { position: relative; width: 20em; height: 20em; }
#img-for-abs-positioning { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; }

If you can get that to work, you might want to try progressively removing the height, width, position attributes from div.header to get the minimal required attributes to get the effect you want.

UPDATE:

Here is a complete example that works on Firefox 3:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN"
          "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Example of vertical positioning inside a div</title>
        <style type="text/css">
            #header > h1 { display: inline; }
            #header { border: solid 1px red; 
                      position: relative; }
            #img-for-abs-positioning { position: absolute;
                                       bottom: -1em; right: 2em; }
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id="header">
            <img src="#" alt="Image 1" width="40" height="40" />
            <h1>Header</h1>
            <img src="#" alt="Image 2" width="40" height="40" 
                 id="img-for-abs-positioning" />
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
  • 3
    I should note that having the right DOCTYPE can sometimes make big differences to how CSS will render, especially on Internet Explorer. I'd recommend you chose a DOCTYPE known to align with a strict standards mode so you can expect more consistent behaviour between browsers. – Mike Tunnicliffe Sep 18 '08 at 17:14
  • 2
    I wouldn't 'expect' any consistency between browsers.. only way to be sure is to test :/ – Cocowalla Nov 10 '09 at 8:03

Using CSS to vertical center, you can let the outer containers act like a table, and the content as a table cell. In this format your objects will stay centered. :)

I nested multiple objects in JSFiddle for an example, but the core idea is like this:

HTML

<div class="circle">
  <div class="content">
    Some text
  </div>
</div>

CSS

 .circle {
   /* act as a table so we can center vertically its child */
   display: table;
   /* set dimensions */
   height: 200px;
   width: 200px;
   /* horizontal center text */
   text-align: center;
   /* create a red circle */
   border-radius: 100%;
   background: red;
 }

 .content {
   /* act as a table cell */
   display: table-cell;
   /* and now we can vertically center! */
   vertical-align: middle;
   /* some basic markup */
   font-size: 30px;
   font-weight: bold;
   color: white;
 }

The multiple objects example:

HTML

<div class="container">
  <div class="content">

    <div class="centerhoriz">

      <div class="circle">
        <div class="content">
          Some text
        </div><!-- content -->
      </div><!-- circle -->

      <div class="square">
        <div class="content">
          <div id="smallcircle"></div>
        </div><!-- content -->
      </div><!-- square -->

    </div><!-- center-horiz -->

  </div><!-- content -->
</div><!-- container -->

CSS

.container {
  display: table;
  height: 500px;
  width: 300px;
  text-align: center;
  background: lightblue;
}

.centerhoriz {
  display: inline-block;
}

.circle {
  display: table;
  height: 200px;
  width: 200px;
  text-align: center;
  background: red;
  border-radius: 100%;
  margin: 10px;
}

.square {
  display: table;
  height: 200px;
  width: 200px;
  text-align: center;
  background: blue;
  margin: 10px;
}

.content {
  display: table-cell;
  vertical-align: middle;
  font-size: 30px;
  font-weight: bold;
  color: white;
}

#smallcircle {
  display: inline-block;
  height: 50px;
  width: 50px;
  background: green;
  border-radius: 100%;
}

Result

Result

https://jsfiddle.net/martjemeyer/ybs032uc/1/

We may use a CSS function calculation to calculate the size of the element and then position the child element accordingly.

Example HTML:

<div class="box">
    <span><a href="#">Some Text</a></span>
</div>

And CSS:

.box {
    display: block;
    background: #60D3E8;
    position: relative;
    width: 300px;
    height: 200px;
    text-align: center;

}
.box span {
    font: bold 20px/20px 'source code pro', sans-serif;
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    right: 0;
    top: calc(50% - 10px);
}
a {
    color: white;
    text-decoration: none;
}

Demo created here: https://jsfiddle.net/xnjq1t22/

This solution works well with responsive div height and width as well.

Note: The calc function is not tested for compatiblity with old browsers.

As per today, I have found a new workaround to vertically align multiple text-lines in a div using CSS3 (and I am also using bootstrap v3 grid system to beautify the UI), which is as below:

.immediate-parent-of-text-containing-div{
    height: 50px;         /* or any fixed height that suits you.*/
}

.text-containing-div {
    display: inline-grid;
    align-items: center;
    text-align: center;
    height: 100%;
}

As per my understanding, immediate parent of text containing element must have some height. I hope it will help you too. Thanks!

Just use a one-cell table inside the div! Just set the cell and table height and with to 100% and you can use the vertical-align.

A one-cell table inside the div handles the vertical-align and is backward compatible back to the Stone Age!

I have been using the following solution (with no positioning and no line height) since over a year, it works with IE 7 and 8 as well.

<style>
.outer {
    font-size: 0;
    width: 400px;
    height: 400px;
    background: orange;
    text-align: center;
    display: inline-block;
}

.outer .emptyDiv {
    height: 100%;
    background: orange;
    visibility: collapse;
}

.outer .inner {
    padding: 10px;
    background: red;
    font: bold 12px Arial;
}

.verticalCenter {
    display: inline-block;
    *display: inline;
    zoom: 1;
    vertical-align: middle;
}
</style>

<div class="outer">
    <div class="emptyDiv verticalCenter"></div>
    <div class="inner verticalCenter">
        <p>Line 1</p>
        <p>Line 2</p>
    </div>
</div>

This is my personal solution for an i element inside a div

JSFiddle Example

HTML

<div class="circle">
    <i class="fa fa-plus icon">
</i></div>

CSS

.circle {
   border-radius: 50%;
   color: blue;
   background-color: red;
   height:100px;
   width:100px;
   text-align: center;
   line-height: 100px;
}

.icon {
  font-size: 50px;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

For me, it worked this way:

<div style="width:70px; height:68px; float:right; display: table-cell; line-height: 68px">
    <a href="javascript:void(0)" style="margin-left: 4px; line-height: 2" class="btn btn-primary">Login</a>
</div>

The "a" element converted to a button, using Bootstrap classes, and it is now vertically centered inside an outer "div".

Updated - Bootstrap-4

Center the child elements vertically and Horizontally

for vertical: d-flex align-items-center

for horizontal: d-flex justify-content-center

.width-height {
    height: 180px;width:100%"
}
<link href="https://maxcdn.bootstrapcdn.com/bootstrap/4.0.0/css/bootstrap.min.css" 
rel="stylesheet"/>

<div class="d-flex align-items-center justify-content-center bg-info width-height">
  <div class="bg-light p-2">I am in Center</div>
</div>

for more, check documentation getbootstrap.com/docs/4.0/utilities/flex/, There are multiple methods to center the elements.

Just this:

<div>
    <table style="width: 100%; height: 100%">
        <tr>
            <td style="width: 100%; height: 100%; vertical-align: middle;">
               What ever you want vertically-aligned
            </td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</div>

A one-cell table inside the div handles the vertical-align and is backward compatible back to the Stone Age!

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN">
<html>
    <head>
        <style type="text/css">
            #style_center { position:relative; top:50%; left:50%; }
            #style_center_absolute { position:absolute; top:50px; left:50px; }
            <!--#style_center { position:relative; top:50%; left:50%; height:50px; margin-top:-25px; }-->
        </style>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div style="height:200px; width:200px; background:#00FF00">
            <div id="style_center">+</div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>

Here is just another (responsive) approach:

html,
    body {
        height: 100%;
    }
    body {
        margin: 0;
    }

    .table {
        display: table;
        width:  auto;
        table-layout:auto;
        height: 100%;
    }
        .table:nth-child(even) {
            background: #a9edc3;
        }
        .table:nth-child(odd) {
            background: #eda9ce;
        }

    .tr {
        display: table-row;
    }
    .td {
        display: table-cell;
        width: 50%;
        vertical-align: middle;
    }

http://jsfiddle.net/herrfischerhamburg/JcVxz/

I'm a .NET guy who just got into web programming. I didn't use CSS (well, a little bit). I used a little JavaScript to accomplish vertical centering along with jQuery's .css function.

I'm just posting everything from my test. It's probably not overly elegant, but it works so far.

script.

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.2.0/jquery.min.js"></script>

        <script type="application/javascript">
            function centerElementVertically(id) {
                var btnDivHeight = $(id).outerHeight();
                var prnt = $(id).parent();
                var parentHeight = prnt.outerHeight();

                var newTop = ((parentHeight - btnDivHeight) / 2) + 'px';
                var newPct = newTop / parentHeight+'%;';

                $(id).css({top: newTop});
            }

            function showAlert(){
                alert("alert");
            }

            $(window).load(()=>{
                centerElementVertically('#buttonRight');
                centerElementVertically('#buttonLeft');
                centerElementVertically('#testerbtn')
            });

            $(window).resize(()=>{
                centerElementVertically('#buttonRight');
                centerElementVertically('#buttonLeft');
                centerElementVertically('#testerbtn')
            })
        </script>

        <style>
            #div1 {
                position:relative;
                height: 33%;
                background-color: red;
                overflow: hidden;
            }
            #buttonLeft {
                position: relative;
                float:left;
                width:50%;
                height:20%;
                background-color: cornsilk;
            }
            #buttonRight {
                position: relative;
                float:right;
                width:50%;
                height:50%;
                background-color: darkorchid;
            }
            #testerbtn {
                position: absolute;
            }
            body {
                background-color: aqua;
            }
        </style>

        <body>
            <div id="div1">
                <div id="buttonLeft">
                    <button id="testerbtn">tester</button>
                </div>
                <div id="buttonRight"></div>
            </div>
        </body>
    </head>
</html>
  • 6
    You're teaching new web developers how to do things wrong, HTML is for defining content, CSS is for styling the HTML, and JavaScript is for manipulating both at runtime depending on conditions. Mixing up those can quickly lead to spaghetti and performance intensive code – OverCoder Jun 7 '16 at 13:17
<div id="header" style="display: table-cell; vertical-align:middle;">

...

or CSS

.someClass
{
   display: table-cell;
   vertical-align:middle;
}

Browser Coverage

  • 1
    The vertical-align property does not apply since the div is display: block by default and nothing appears to have been done to change it. – Quentin Mar 12 '10 at 12:38
  • 2
    Apparently the display was updated to table-cell, which makes vertical-align: middle; work. Even better, it works without needing a nested wrapper/buffer div, and it works for both text and images (or both), and you don't need to change the position properties. – MSpreij Jun 24 '12 at 17:56
  • 3
    This one works. It changes the display to table-cell which takes the vertical-align property. No idea why people vote this down. – texasbruce Dec 17 '12 at 4:55
  • 1
    yes, as far as i know this is the least intrusive way to center anything verticaly in a div. +1 – Pma Jan 8 '13 at 0:22
  • Ok, maybe i was too quick with my conclusions... Adding display:table-cell breakes div margin and additionaly border is displayed outside div, border combined with border-radius displays rounded corners inside of the div istead of outside – Pma Jan 9 '13 at 9:42

protected by Hashem Qolami Sep 23 '14 at 9:50

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