15

In my current program one method asks the user to enter the description of a product as a String input. However, when I later attempt to print out this information, only the first word of the String shows. What could be the cause of this? My method is as follows:

void setDescription(Product aProduct) {
    Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.print("Describe the product: ");
    String productDescription = input.next();
    aProduct.description = productDescription;
}

So if the user input is "Sparkling soda with orange flavor", the System.out.print will only yield "Sparkling".

Any help will be greatly appreciated!

27

Replace next() with nextLine():

String productDescription = input.nextLine();
1
  • This will fail if any next() call precedes the nextLine() call. The right answer is not to use nextLine (you rarely need nextLine); instead, fix your scanner's delimiter: call .useDelimiter("\r?\n"); on it immediately after its creation. Feb 23 at 13:40
9

Use input.nextLine(); instead of input.next();

0
4

The javadocs for Scanner answer your question

A Scanner breaks its input into tokens using a delimiter pattern, which by default matches whitespace.

You might change the default whitespace pattern the Scanner is using by doing something like

Scanner s = new Scanner();
s.useDelimiter("\n");
2
  • 2
    Why mess with that when nextLine() was written specifically for this situation and solves all neatly? Oct 30 '11 at 17:56
  • @HovercraftFullOfEels Because this works great in all cases, no questions asked. It can even read empty lines now. nextLine, in contrast, fails in baffling ways. Such as when you do: Scanner s = new Scanner(System.in); s.nextInt(); s.nextLine(); - that last nextLine will always return an empty string. You can't fix it by adding extra nextLine calls, because now your code breaks if the user enters data separated by spaces instead of enters. No easy fixes there. Update the delimiter and this bizarreness simply cannot occur, which is why it is the right answer. Feb 23 at 13:42
1

input.next() takes in the first whitsepace-delimited word of the input string. So by design it does what you've described. Try input.nextLine().

0
0

Javadoc to the rescue :

A Scanner breaks its input into tokens using a delimiter pattern, which by default matches whitespace

nextLine is probably the method you should use.

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