13

I've implemented History.js on a local test application. Everything seems to work, however if I press the back button in the browser, the previous content does not get restored.

Do I actually have to load the content manually again (i.e. make another ajax call) when user presses the back button? Then how does github do it? I see they don't make another ajax call when clicking back button in the code tree.

Here is my code:

History.Adapter.bind(window,'statechange',function()
    {
        var State = History.getState();
        History.log(State.data, State.title, State.url);
    });


    $('a').each(function(index, link) {

    if ($(link).attr('data-ajax-disabled') != 'true')    {

      $(link).click(function(event)
      {

         var clips = $(this).attr('data-ajax-clips') || '';

         $.ajax($(this).attr('href'),
         {
            data: {_clips:clips},
            success: function(data)
            {

               var data = $.parseJSON(data);


               History.pushState({state:1}, data.title || document.title, 'http://127.0.0.1/site/www/');


               $.each(data.clips, function(key, val)
               {
                  $(key).replaceWith(val);
               });

            }
         });

         return false;

      });
  }
  });

data.clips is a json array which contains id's of html objects as key and the actual html content as value. For example

'#header' => 'content in header div'

As noted, the replacement works fine. I output a random number in the header. Every click on a link spits out another random number in the header. However, if I push the back button the number stays the same, only the title will be restored (also random number).

  • 2
    Yes, if you override the browser history functionality, then you're responsible for displaying the correct content when a user goes back or forward. To avoid another AJAX call for the same content, you can either hide it on the page using .hide(), or store the HTML in a variable, then load it back in when required. – Tobias Cohen Oct 31 '11 at 1:26
12

Ok I got it, also thanks to Tobias Cohen for the hint.

One has to store the loaded data in the history object (State.data). First let's see how the statechange callback changed:

History.Adapter.bind(window, 'statechange', function()
{

    var State = History.getState();

    $.each(State.data.clips, function(key, val)
    {
        $(key).replaceWith(val);
    });

    History.log(State.data, State.title, State.url);

});

As you can see, on each statechange I can access State.data.clips and replace the html content.

NOTE: A statechange does also happen when calling History.pushState(). That means in my initial question the second code snippet is wrong in the fact that I do the content manipulation in there. There's no need for it. Just call History.pushState() and do any content manipulation within the statechange callback.

So for completeness, this is how I push the clips into the history object:

History.pushState({state:1, clips:data.clips}, data.title || document.title, 'http://127.0.0.1/site/www/');

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