17

When I retrieve a list of items from a database including some children (via .Include), and order the randomly, EF gives me an unexpected result.. I creates/clones addition items..

To explain myself better, I've created a small and simple EF CodeFirst project to reproduce the problem. First i shall give you the code for this project.

The project

Create a basic MVC3 project and add the EntityFramework.SqlServerCompact package via Nuget.
That adds the latest versions of the following packages:

  • EntityFramework v4.3.0
  • SqlServerCompact v4.0.8482.1
  • EntityFramework.SqlServerCompact v4.1.8482.2
  • WebActivator v1.5

The Models and DbContext

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;

namespace RandomWithInclude.Models
{
    public class PeopleContext : DbContext
    {
        public DbSet<Person> Persons { get; set; }
        public DbSet<Address> Addresses { get; set; }
    }

    public class Person
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }

        public virtual ICollection<Address> Addresses { get; set; }
    }

    public class Address
    {
        public int ID { get; set; }
        public string AdressLine { get; set; }

        public virtual Person Person { get; set; }
    }
}

The DB Setup and Seed data: EF.SqlServerCompact.cs

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Data.Entity.Infrastructure;
using RandomWithInclude.Models;

[assembly: WebActivator.PreApplicationStartMethod(typeof(RandomWithInclude.App_Start.EF), "Start")]

namespace RandomWithInclude.App_Start
{
    public static class EF
    {
        public static void Start()
        {
            Database.DefaultConnectionFactory = new SqlCeConnectionFactory("System.Data.SqlServerCe.4.0");
            Database.SetInitializer(new DbInitializer());
        }
    }
    public class DbInitializer : DropCreateDatabaseAlways<PeopleContext>
    {
        protected override void Seed(PeopleContext context)
        {
            var address1 = new Address {AdressLine = "Street 1, City 1"};
            var address2 = new Address {AdressLine = "Street 2, City 2"};
            var address3 = new Address {AdressLine = "Street 3, City 3"};
            var address4 = new Address {AdressLine = "Street 4, City 4"};
            var address5 = new Address {AdressLine = "Street 5, City 5"};
            context.Addresses.Add(address1);
            context.Addresses.Add(address2);
            context.Addresses.Add(address3);
            context.Addresses.Add(address4);
            context.Addresses.Add(address5);
            var person1 = new Person {Name = "Person 1", Addresses = new List<Address> {address1, address2}};
            var person2 = new Person {Name = "Person 2", Addresses = new List<Address> {address3}};
            var person3 = new Person {Name = "Person 3", Addresses = new List<Address> {address4, address5}};
            context.Persons.Add(person1);
            context.Persons.Add(person2);
            context.Persons.Add(person3);
        }
    }
}

The controller: HomeController.cs

using System;
using System.Data.Entity;
using System.Linq;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using RandomWithInclude.Models;

namespace RandomWithInclude.Controllers
{
    public class HomeController : Controller
    {
        public ActionResult Index()
        {
            var db = new PeopleContext();
            var persons = db.Persons
                                .Include(p => p.Addresses)
                                .OrderBy(p => Guid.NewGuid());

            return View(persons.ToList());
        }
    }
}

The View: Index.cshtml

@using RandomWithInclude.Models
@model IList<Person>

<ul>
    @foreach (var person in Model)
    {
        <li>
            @person.Name
        </li>
    }
</ul>

this should be all, and you application should compile :)


The problem

As you can see, we have 2 straightforward models (Person and Address) and Person can have multiple Addresses.
We seed the generated database 3 persons and 5 addresses.
If we get all the persons from the database, including the addresses and randomize the results and just print out the names of those persons, that's where it all goes wrong.

As a result, i sometimes get 4 persons, sometimes 5 and sometimes 3, and i expect 3. Always.
e.g.:

  • Person 1
  • Person 3
  • Person 1
  • Person 3
  • Person 2

So.. it's copying/cloning data! And that's not cool..
It just seems that EF looses track of what addresses are a child of which person..

The generated SQL query is this:

SELECT 
    [Project1].[ID] AS [ID], 
    [Project1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Project1].[C2] AS [C1], 
    [Project1].[ID1] AS [ID1], 
    [Project1].[AdressLine] AS [AdressLine], 
    [Project1].[Person_ID] AS [Person_ID]
FROM ( SELECT 
    NEWID() AS [C1], 
    [Extent1].[ID] AS [ID], 
    [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Extent2].[ID] AS [ID1], 
    [Extent2].[AdressLine] AS [AdressLine], 
    [Extent2].[Person_ID] AS [Person_ID], 
    CASE WHEN ([Extent2].[ID] IS NULL) THEN CAST(NULL AS int) ELSE 1 END AS [C2]
    FROM  [People] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [Addresses] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent1].[ID] = [Extent2].[Person_ID]
)  AS [Project1]
ORDER BY [Project1].[C1] ASC, [Project1].[ID] ASC, [Project1].[C2] ASC

Workarounds

  1. If i remove the .Include(p =>p.Addresses) from the query, everything goes fine. but of course the addresses aren't loaded and accessing that collection will make a new call to the database every time.
  2. I can first get the data from the database and randomize later by just adding a .ToList() before the .OrderBy.. like this: var persons = db.Persons.Include(p => p.Addresses).ToList().OrderBy(p => Guid.NewGuid());

Does anybody have any idea of why it is happening like this?
Might this be a bug in the SQL generation?

  • "Might this be a bug in the SQL generation" - have you tried executing the both queries (working/non working) and see if they differ in the result? Anyways. I think this is just another bug you have found in the framework. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb896317.aspx and "Projecting to an Anonymous Type" this somehow smells related. There's something fishy that needs to be killed in this framework. – stefan Nov 6 '11 at 21:09
  • @stefan: yes i've tried that, and of course returns a different result, which indeed points to a sql generation bug.. But i don't think it is listed there already.. – Filip Cornelissen Nov 7 '11 at 8:59
  • The problem occurs by the way also with EF 4.1 on SQL Server (tested on 2008 R2), not only with SQLCompact. I think, @np-hard's answer is correct that the problem is in EF's object materialization, not in the generated SQL. If OrderBy is not on a property of the parent entity, nonsense happens. – Slauma Nov 15 '11 at 18:50
8

As one can sort it out by reading AakashM answer and Nicolae Dascalu answer, it strongly seems Linq OrderBy requires a stable ranking function, which NewID/Guid.NewGuid is not.

So we have to use another random generator that would be stable inside a single query.

To achieve this, before each querying, use a .Net Random generator to get a random number. Then combine this random number with a unique property of the entity to get randomly sorted. And to 'randomize' a bit the result, checksum it. (checksum is a SQL Server function that compute a hash; original idea founded on this blog.)

Assuming Person Id is an int, you could write your query this way :

var rnd = (new Random()).NextDouble();
var persons = db.Persons
    .Include(p => p.Addresses)
    .OrderBy(p => SqlFunctions.Checksum(p.Id * rnd));

Like the NewGuid hack, this is very probably not a good random generator with a good distribution and so on. But it does not cause entities to get duplicated in results.

Beware:
If your query ordering does not guarantees uniqueness of your entities ranking, you must complement it for guarantying it. By example, if you use a non-unique property of your entities for the checksum call, then add something like .ThenBy(p => p.Id) after the OrderBy.
If your ranking is not unique for your queried root entity, its included children may get mixed with children of other entities having the same ranking. And then the bug will stay here.

Note:
I would prefer use .Next() method to get an int then combine it through a xor (^) to an entity int unique property, rather than using a double and multiply it. But SqlFunctions.Checksum unfortunately does not provide an overload for int data type, though the SQL server function is supposed to support it. You may use a cast to overcome this, but for keeping it simple I finally had chosen to go with the multiply.

  • Nice solution! But what about performance? It doesn't seem lightweight at all! – SepehrM Apr 27 '16 at 15:52
  • 1
    On my current data volume and requests load, this does not have noticeable impact for user. But my current data volume is light : less than 5 000 matching rows to sort. (And due to the app nature, it will probably not go higher than 50 000.) Anyway, I have already a fallback in place: I use the same technic in a sql job for regularly recomputing an indexed RandomRank column on target tables, for other cases where I need a "static" random ordering across requests. So if the perf of dynamic goes wrong, I may negotiate with business to use the static one everywhere instead. – Frédéric Apr 27 '16 at 18:49
  • And by the way, this CheckSum sort does not look to me heavier than the NewGuid sort: both causes the server to have no index on which to perform the sort; NewID computations are probably not really lighter than a multiplication followed by a checksum. – Frédéric Apr 27 '16 at 18:57
  • Where does SqlFunctions come from? How can I do this in .NET Core? – Neme Aug 27 '17 at 16:40
  • It does not seems available with .Net Core. See the link I have added to reference in my last paragraph. – Frédéric Aug 28 '17 at 12:59
5
+25

I dont think there is an issue in query generation, but there is definately an issue when EF tries to convert rows into object.

It looks like there is an inherent assumption here that data for the same person in a joined statement will be returned grouped together order by or not.

for example the result of a joined query will always be

P.Id P.Name  A.Id A.StreetLine
1    Person 1 10    --- 
1    Person 1 11
2    Person 2 12
3    Person 3 13
3    Person 3 14 

even if you order by some other column, same person would always appear one after the other.

this assumption is mostly true for any joined query.

But there is a deeper issue here i think. OrderBy is for when you want data in certain order ( as opposite to random), so that assumption does seem reasonable.

i think you should really get data out and then randomize it according to some other means in your code

  • "inherent assumption": I agree and would guess the same. Object materialization returns wrong result in case of random sorting and a possible fix would require that EF groups the returned data which would make materialization of eagerly loaded data more expensive. Sorting in memory is also possibly cheaper because it only sorts the parent entities and not the two joined (parent,child) tables as the database would do. – Slauma Nov 15 '11 at 18:43
  • "OrderBy is for when you want data in certain order ( as opposite to random)" How is random order NOT a certain order? Also "random" in computer science is just a specific algorithm so its just order by a unique-for-the-query sequence. – stefan Nov 16 '11 at 10:19
  • 2
    well in my defense, random as an adjective does mean 'lacking any definate plan or prearranged order' :-) – np-hard Nov 16 '11 at 14:53
5

tl;dr: There's a leaky abstraction here. To us, Include is a simple instruction to stick a collection of things onto each single returned Person row. But EF's implementation of Include is done by returning a whole row for each Person-Address combo, and reassembling at the client. Ordering by a volatile value causes those rows to become shuffled, breaking apart the Person groups that EF is relying on.


When we have a look at ToTraceString() for this LINQ:

 var people = c.People.Include("Addresses");
 // Note: no OrderBy in sight!

we see

SELECT 
[Project1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Project1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Project1].[C1] AS [C1], 
[Project1].[Id1] AS [Id1], 
[Project1].[Data] AS [Data], 
[Project1].[PersonId] AS [PersonId]
FROM ( SELECT 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1], 
    [Extent2].[PersonId] AS [PersonId], 
    [Extent2].[Data] AS [Data], 
    CASE WHEN ([Extent2].[Id] IS NULL) THEN CAST(NULL AS int) ELSE 1 END AS [C1]
    FROM  [Person] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [Address] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent1].[Id] = [Extent2].[PersonId]
)  AS [Project1]
ORDER BY [Project1].[Id] ASC, [Project1].[C1] ASC

So we get n rows for each A, plus 1 row for each P without any As.

Adding an OrderBy clause, however, puts the thing-to-order-by at the start of the ordered columns:

var people = c.People.Include("Addresses").OrderBy(p => Guid.NewGuid());

gives

SELECT 
[Project1].[Id] AS [Id], 
[Project1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Project1].[C2] AS [C1], 
[Project1].[Id1] AS [Id1], 
[Project1].[Data] AS [Data], 
[Project1].[PersonId] AS [PersonId]
FROM ( SELECT 
    NEWID() AS [C1], 
    [Extent1].[Id] AS [Id], 
    [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
    [Extent2].[Id] AS [Id1], 
    [Extent2].[PersonId] AS [PersonId], 
    [Extent2].[Data] AS [Data], 
    CASE WHEN ([Extent2].[Id] IS NULL) THEN CAST(NULL AS int) ELSE 1 END AS [C2]
    FROM  [Person] AS [Extent1]
    LEFT OUTER JOIN [Address] AS [Extent2] ON [Extent1].[Id] = [Extent2].[PersonId]
)  AS [Project1]
ORDER BY [Project1].[C1] ASC, [Project1].[Id] ASC, [Project1].[C2] ASC

So in your case, where the ordered-by-thing is not a property of a P, but is instead volatile, and therefore can be different for different P-A records of the same P, the whole thing falls apart.


I'm not sure where on the working-as-intended ~~~ cast-iron bug continuum this behaviour falls. But at least now we know about it.

  • even if it's working-as-intended, it's not what we expect as a result from it.. – Filip Cornelissen Nov 18 '11 at 9:07
  • 1
    See Nicolae answer, it really could be a "work as intended case" and even "expected". So long for the NewGuid random sort hack, it simply looks like broken. – Frédéric Jul 6 '15 at 9:38
2

From theory: To sort a list of items, the compare function should be stable relative to items; this means that for any 2 items x, y the result of x< y should be the same as many time is queried(called).

I think the issue is related to misunderstanding of specification(documentation) of OrderBy method: keySelector - A function to extract a key from an element.

EF didn't mention explicitly if the provided function should return the same value for same object as many times is called (in your case returns different/random values), but I think the "key" term that they used in documentation implicitly suggested this.

  • This blog post further confirm that using unstable compare function leads to bugs. – Frédéric Sep 18 '15 at 22:33
0

When you define a query path to define the query results, (use Include), the query path is only valid on the returned instance of ObjectQuery. Other instances of ObjectQuery and the object context itself are not affected. This functionality lets you chain multiple "Includes" for eager loading.

Therefor, Your statement translates into

from person in db.Persons.Include(p => p.Addresses).OrderBy(p => Guid.NewGuid())
select person

instead of what you intended.

from person in db.Persons.Include(p => p.Addresses)
select person
.OrderBy(p => Guid.NewGuid())

Hence your second workaround works fine :)

Reference: Loading Related Objects While Querying A Conceptual Model in Entity Framework - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb896272.aspx

  • Hey @Sai, thanks for you reaction, but you query is syntactically incorrect. i changed it to: (from person in db.Persons.Include(p => p.Addresses) select person).OrderBy(p => Guid.NewGuid()), but that just generates the same SQL and keeps the issue.. So this is not the answer. just my query written differently :) – Filip Cornelissen Nov 1 '11 at 8:09
0

I also ran into this problem, and solved it by adding a Randomizer Guid property to the main class I was fetching. I then set the column's default value to NEWID() like this (using EF Core 2)

builder.Entity<MainClass>()
    .Property(m => m.Randomizer)
    .HasDefaultValueSql("NEWID()");

When fetching, it gets a bit more complicated. I created two random integers to function as my order-by indexes, then ran the query like this

var rand = new Random();
var randomIndex1 = rand.Next(0, 31);
var randomIndex2 = rand.Next(0, 31);
var taskSet = await DbContext.MainClasses
    .Include(m => m.SubClass1)
        .ThenInclude(s => s.SubClass2)
    .OrderBy(m => m.Randomizer.ToString().Replace("-", "")[randomIndex1])
        .ThenBy(m => m.Randomizer.ToString().Replace("-", "")[randomIndex2])
    .FirstOrDefaultAsync();

This seems to be working well enough, and should provide enough entropy for even a large dataset to be fairly randomized.

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