109
int qempty()
{
    return (f == r ? 1 : 0);
}

In the above snippet, what does "?" mean? What can we replace it with?

4
  • 25
    In this particular case of course, you can just replace it with return f==r;
    – Eclipse
    Apr 27, 2009 at 21:15
  • 7
    @Eclipse: I wouldn't rely on an implicit conversion bool->int if I can avoid it. Jun 23, 2009 at 7:10
  • 2
    @DanielDaranas why not? (This is kind of a beginner question- an explanation of your comments for beginners would be very helpful and appreciated.) Feb 5, 2015 at 4:08
  • 4
    @MichaelHoffmann The behaviour of the implicit conversion in this case is well defined, so using it is perfectly correct; see this answer for a reference to the standard. Personally, I avoid using implicit type conversions because I think the code is more readable and maintainable and less error prone without them. I wrote in more detail about it in this blog post. Feb 5, 2015 at 9:10

8 Answers 8

168

This is commonly referred to as the conditional operator, and when used like this:

condition ? result_if_true : result_if_false

... if the condition evaluates to true, the expression evaluates to result_if_true, otherwise it evaluates to result_if_false.

It is syntactic sugar, and in this case, it can be replaced with

int qempty()
{ 
  if(f == r)
  {
      return 1;
  } 
  else 
  {
      return 0;
  }
}

Note: Some people refer to ?: it as "the ternary operator", because it is the only ternary operator (i.e. operator that takes three arguments) in the language they are using.

4
  • 5
    In regular code, it's syntactic sugar, but it does enable you to do conditional initialization in the initialization list of the constructot.
    – JohnMcG
    Apr 28, 2009 at 3:11
  • Foo(Bar* y) pMember (y == NULL ? NULL : y->pMember) -- Here, we initialize pMember to y's pMember, or NULL if it's not there. Can't put if-else in a constructor initialization, so ternary operator makes it possible.
    – JohnMcG
    Sep 12, 2010 at 12:38
  • @JohnMcG: Well, in C++11 you could consider a? b : c syntactic sugar for [&]() -> Type { if (a) return b; else return c; }().
    – celtschk
    Sep 7, 2014 at 10:09
  • 2
    Probably, but the question, answer, and comment were written in 2009.
    – JohnMcG
    Sep 12, 2014 at 19:09
17

This is a ternary operator, it's basically an inline if statement

x ? y : z

works like

if(x) y else z

except, instead of statements you have expressions; so you can use it in the middle of a more complex statement.

It's useful for writing succinct code, but can be overused to create hard to maintain code.

2
  • 4
    worthwhile to know that there is a sequence point at the '?'. That means the following is valid: ++x ? x : y; Apr 27, 2009 at 21:32
  • 1
    @Daniel, that's what I meant by having expressions rather than statements. I probably wasn't explicit enough about the difference, so thanks for adding some clarification.
    – Richard
    Apr 27, 2009 at 21:37
13

Just a note, if you ever see this:

a = x ? : y;

It's a GNU extension to the standard (see https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Conditionals.html#Conditionals).

It is the same as

a = x ? x : y;
1
  • in CLang (at least the most recent versions) this extension is also available. It's available even with C++11 flag turned off in a qmake project. So an expression like int x = 1+1 ? : 0 ; correctly returns 2 , in my compiler and this didn't complain anything. Dec 8, 2015 at 17:38
6

You can just rewrite it as:

int qempty(){ return(f==r);}

Which does the same thing as said in the other answers.

1
  • 1
    this would perform implicit conversion from boolean to int Oct 6, 2015 at 17:53
5

It is called the conditional operator.

You can replace it with:

int qempty(){ 
    if (f == r) return 1;
    else return 0;
}
3

It's the conditional operator.

a ? b : c

It's a shortcut for IF/THEN/ELSE.

means: if a is true, return b, else return c. In this case, if f==r, return 1, else return 0.

2

The question mark is the conditional operator. The code means that if f==r then 1 is returned, otherwise, return 0. The code could be rewritten as

int qempty()
{
  if(f==r)
    return 1;
  else
    return 0;
}

which is probably not the cleanest way to do it, but hopefully helps your understanding.

2

It read as:

If f == r then return 1 else return 0

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