126

This is a pretty simple Java (though probably applicable to all programming) question:

Math.random() returns a number between zero and one.

If I want to return an integer between zero and hundred, I would do:

(int) Math.floor(Math.random() * 101)

Between one and hundred, I would do:

(int) Math.ceil(Math.random() * 100)

But what if I wanted to get a number between three and five? Will it be like following statement:

(int) Math.random() * 5 + 3

I know about nextInt() in java.lang.util.Random. But I want to learn how to do this with Math.random().

  • For [3,5]: (int)Math.floor(Math.random()*3) + 3 – good_evening Nov 1 '11 at 2:19
  • 9
    BTW: the range is from 0.0 inclusive to 1.0 exclusive (you won't actaully get 1.0 ever) Using nextInt() is a far better choice, not only is it simpler but also much faster. – Peter Lawrey Nov 1 '11 at 8:23
  • 2
    Using Math.ceil is wrong, it gives the wrong result when Math.random() returns 0. – starblue Nov 2 '11 at 7:26
  • What if Math.floor returns 0.029? How to always get a two digit number with a single statement? – Naisheel Verdhan Oct 3 '15 at 14:33
158
int randomWithRange(int min, int max)
{
   int range = (max - min) + 1;     
   return (int)(Math.random() * range) + min;
}

Output of randomWithRange(2, 5) 10 times:

5
2
3
3
2
4
4
4
5
4

The bounds are inclusive, ie [2,5], and min must be less than max in the above example.

EDIT: If someone was going to try and be stupid and reverse min and max, you could change the code to:

int randomWithRange(int min, int max)
{
   int range = Math.abs(max - min) + 1;     
   return (int)(Math.random() * range) + (min <= max ? min : max);
}

EDIT2: For your question about doubles, it's just:

double randomWithRange(double min, double max)
{
   double range = (max - min);     
   return (Math.random() * range) + min;
}

And again if you want to idiot-proof it it's just:

double randomWithRange(double min, double max)
{
   double range = Math.abs(max - min);     
   return (Math.random() * range) + (min <= max ? min : max);
}
  • 1
    What if you don't use (int) and want it to return a double? – switz Nov 1 '11 at 2:36
  • If you want double then just replace the ints with doubles (and the typecast is unnecessary). I assumed you wanted ints but I'll add to my post. – AusCBloke Nov 1 '11 at 2:40
  • 2
    Actually with doubles remove the + 1 also since Math.random() isn't being truncated. However, the range will be [min, max) since Math.random "Returns a double value with a positive sign, greater than or equal to 0.0 and less than 1.0." There'd be a very minimal chance of the number being exactly max anyway even if it was possible. – AusCBloke Nov 1 '11 at 2:47
  • Great answer, thank you! – switz Nov 1 '11 at 19:06
42

If you want to generate a number from 0 to 100, then your code would look like this:

(int)(Math.random() * 101);

To generate a number from 10 to 20 :

(int)(Math.random() * 11 + 10);

In the general case:

(int)(Math.random() * ((upperbound - lowerbound) + 1) + lowerbound);

(where lowerbound is inclusive and upperbound exclusive).

The inclusion or exclusion of upperbound depends on your choice. Let's say range = (upperbound - lowerbound) + 1 then upperbound is inclusive, but if range = (upperbound - lowerbound) then upperbound is exclusive.

Example: If I want an integer between 3-5, then if range is (5-3)+1 then 5 is inclusive, but if range is just (5-3) then 5 is exclusive.

  • 2
    upperbound exclusive? I think it'll be inclusive. – vidit Sep 7 '16 at 14:55
  • 1
    @vidit it's exclusive – user6110959 Jan 20 '17 at 22:49
  • 1
    don't think you're gettin the big picture upperbound can be either, as provided in the example – Teezy7 Nov 13 '18 at 10:19
19

The Random class of Java located in the java.util package will serve your purpose better. It has some nextInt() methods that return an integer. The one taking an int argument will generate a number between 0 and that int, the latter not inclusive.

  • I updated my question, I'd like to know how to do it with Math.random(). Thanks. – switz Nov 1 '11 at 2:17
  • +1 for the more reliable way to do it. – trashgod Nov 1 '11 at 2:29
1

To generate a number between 10 to 20 inclusive, you can use java.util.Random

int myNumber = new Random().nextInt(11) + 10
0

Here's a method which receives boundaries and returns a random integer. It is slightly more advanced (completely universal): boundaries can be both positive and negative, and minimum/maximum boundaries can come in any order.

int myRand(int i_from, int i_to) {
  return (int)(Math.random() * (Math.abs(i_from - i_to) + 1)) + Math.min(i_from, i_to);
}

In general, it finds the absolute distance between the borders, gets relevant random value, and then shifts the answer based on the bottom border.

protected by Community Oct 22 '15 at 22:09

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