39

I have a procedure I am doing that displays odds but the client wants only significant digits to be shown. So, 1.50 would show as '1.5' and 1.00 would show as '1'.

How can I get MySQL to not display trailing zeros;

i.e. in the database:

Odds
1.500
23.030
2.000
4.450

would display as

1.5
23.03
2
4.45

Thanks for any help

14 Answers 14

88

Easiest way by far, just add zero!

Examples:

SET 
    @yournumber1="1.500", 
    @yournumber2="23.030",
    @yournumber3="2.000",
    @yournumber4="4.450"
;

SELECT 
    (@yournumber1+0),
    (@yournumber2+0),
    (@yournumber3+0),
    (@yournumber4+0)
;

+------------------+------------------+------------------+------------------+
| (@yournumber1+0) | (@yournumber2+0) | (@yournumber3+0) | (@yournumber4+0) |
+------------------+------------------+------------------+------------------+
|              1.5 |            23.03 |                2 |             4.45 |
+------------------+------------------+------------------+------------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

If the column your value comes from is DECIMAL or NUMERIC type, then cast it to string first to make sure the conversion takes place...ex:

SELECT (CAST(`column_name` AS CHAR)+0) FROM `table_name`;

For a shorter way, just use any built-in string function to do the cast:

SELECT TRIM(`column_name`)+0 FROM `table_name`;
8
  • 9
    this one SELECT TRIM(`column_name`)+0 FROM `table_name`; helped me out. Apr 7, 2016 at 11:11
  • I should also add, if precision is desired, can use a math operation that implicitly casts to numeric. Mar 23, 2018 at 17:57
  • 4
    The fact that the output type is a double actually causes problems too. 79228162514264337593543950335.000 becomes 7.922816251426434e28
    – Jannes
    May 28, 2018 at 16:06
  • This does not work within CONCAT: SELECT CONCAT(SUM(titels)+0, ' titels') FROM fact_data_uitg_factuurKosten Will render 5.0 titels.
    – Roemer
    Jul 23, 2018 at 16:18
  • 1
    @Roemer, see the part about converting values that are numeric types already into string before adding zero Jul 23, 2018 at 16:28
43

EDIT: I would use the answer below by Christopher McGowan instead - adding 0 to the value, which is better, instead.


It's important to check there is actually a decimal point if doing trimming.

So I think you'd want to use:

SELECT TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' from yourfield)) AS yourfield
FROM yourtable
WHERE yourfield LIKE '%.%'
3
  • Wouldn't it be simpler to just use FLOOR()?
    – pspahn
    Feb 20, 2015 at 19:49
  • 5
    For 23.030, for instance, FLOOR() would return 23 rather than 23.03.
    – fooquency
    Oct 5, 2015 at 12:20
  • 1
    Horribly convulated and messes with an existing query. At least do something like IF(yourfield LIKE '%.%', blabla, yourfield) AS yourfield and don't mess with the WHERE clause. Anyway, the really correct answer is by Christopher McGowan.
    – Jannes
    Nov 11, 2015 at 8:22
13

this worked for me.. round the field to 2 decimal places and then trim any trailing zeros

So that 2.10 is 2.1

SELECT trim(round(FIELDNAME,2))+0 
FROM tbl_name
....
3
  • This will work just fine without the round function.
    – kojow7
    Sep 26, 2019 at 15:45
  • 2
    This is the one that works. SELECT TRIM(ROUND(3/5,3))+0 works, SELECT ROUND(3/5,3)+0 does not.
    – Roemer
    Mar 12, 2021 at 12:19
  • kojow: but then you can have endless digits behind the decimal point. For reporting, you mostly won't want that.
    – Roemer
    Mar 12, 2021 at 12:20
6

To remove trailing zeros from a DECIMAL/NUMERIC or string type column, you can simply cast the value to DOUBLE, e.g.:

SELECT CAST(mycol AS DOUBLE) from mytable;

or

SELECT mycol + 0E0 FROM mytable;

In fact, the "cast to char and add zero" trick mentioned in other answers does the same, but in a more indirect (and likely less efficient) way, e.g:

SELECT CAST(mycol AS CHAR)+0 FROM mytable; -- converts to string, then to number
SELECT TRIM(mycol)+0 FROM mytable; -- ditto
3
  • Casting to DOUBLE worked beautifully until I moved from MariaDB away to MySQL 5.7: You have an error in your SQL syntax [...] near 'DOUBLE. I could cry.
    – Anse
    Aug 10, 2021 at 13:38
  • @Anse Does SELECT mycol + 0E0 FROM mytable work? Casting to DOUBLE seems to require MySQL 8.0.17. Aug 10, 2021 at 15:43
  • Indeed, mycol + 0E0 works on MySQL 5.7 and strips trailing decimal zeros. Interesting, as 0E0 is just the scientific notation of 0, isn't it?
    – Anse
    Aug 12, 2021 at 4:38
2

Please use below function , it will take care of number having zero without decimal places i.e 150 etc....

 SET @saved_cs_client     = @@character_set_client;
 SET character_set_client = utf8;
 DELIMITER $$
 USE `mydbname`$$

 DROP FUNCTION IF EXISTS `FN_STRIP_TRAILING_ZER0`$$

 CREATE DEFINER=`mydbuser`@`%` FUNCTION `FN_STRIP_TRAILING_ZER0`(tNumber DECIMAL(10,7)) RETURNS VARCHAR(20) CHARSET utf8

 BEGIN
     DECLARE strBuff VARCHAR(20);
     DECLARE cnt  NUMERIC(2);
     DECLARE tString VARCHAR(20);
     SELECT CAST(tNumber AS CHAR) INTO tString;
     SELECT LOCATE('.',tString) INTO cnt;
     IF cnt > 0 THEN
       SELECT TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' FROM tString)) INTO strBuff;   
     ELSE
       SET strBuff = tString;
     END IF;
     RETURN strBuff;
 END$$
 DELIMITER ;
 SET character_set_client = @saved_cs_client;

Addendum:

Typically to call this would involve: SELECT FN_STRIP_TRAILING_ZER0(1.5);

1
  • Isn't this is a very complex reinvention of what MySQL can do with its built-in string to numeric type casting logic? Jan 31, 2015 at 2:13
2

The best solution I found is to cast your round value to FLOAT:

SELECT CAST(ROUND(1.2345984372, 2) AS FLOAT)
2
  • 1
    while this may be an accurate answer to the question, please be aware that this is a very old question, asked and answered 4 years ago. Very old answers like this should take extra care to demonstrate how the new answer is relevant to people searching and finding this question relating to a problem they are having.
    – Claies
    Mar 6, 2015 at 21:10
  • 1
    AS FLOAT gave an error, but AS DOUBLE worked for me. +0 didn't, so this for me is the one that works. i.ibb.co/SvkG1Zc/cast.png
    – Roemer
    Jun 18, 2019 at 13:36
2

Here's what worked for me:

SINGLE COLUMN:

SELECT TRIM(column_name)+0 AS column_name FROM table_name;

MULTIPLE COLUMNS:

SELECT 
TRIM(column1)+0 AS column1,
TRIM(column2)+0 AS column2,   
TRIM(column3)+0 AS column3,
FROM table_name;
1
  • This worked on a DECIMAL (8,4) column, while CAST (mycol AS DOUBLE) gave a syntax error. Apr 30, 2021 at 10:16
1

Taking forward the answer provided by @fooquency, if the column is already declared as a DECIMAL with a non-zero value for D in DECIMAL(M, D), we do not need to perform the WHERE condition

WHERE yourfield LIKE '%.%'

as the values in the column will always contain D digits after the decimal dot (.)

1
  • Note: This kind of formatting does not seem to be very precise in summation, with a lot digits after the decimal dot. For instance, dont use "SELECT SUM(TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' from yourfield)))" in very high precision requirements (precision implying digits after the decimal dot).
    – mohitp
    Sep 29, 2012 at 13:43
0

I had a similar problem in a situation where I could not modify the code nor the SQL query, but I was allowed to modify the database structure. So I changed the column format from DECIMAL to FLOAT and it solved my problem.

1
  • 1
    Commented on this before but that could be a dangerous change. DECIMAL type is used for exact values. FLOAT type is for approximate values. Jun 20, 2014 at 20:42
0

Using ROUND or CEILING, in the query you just have to type:

SELECT ROUND(2/50) 

or

SELECT CEILING(2/50)
1
  • 1
    But then you lose precision. Jun 20, 2014 at 20:39
-1

If you are using PHP as the scripting language you may use the following:

$var = (float)$var_having_extra_0; // $var = (float) 17.5000

Or use the PHP floatval function:

$var = floatval($var_having_extra_0); // $var = floatval(17.5000)
1
  • PHP is not included in question tags
    – Loki
    Apr 15, 2019 at 13:33
-1
SELECT TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' from yourfield)) AS yourfield
FROM yourtable
WHERE yourfield LIKE '%.%'

or

SELECT TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' from yourfield)) AS yourfield
FROM yourtable
WHERE instr(yourfield,'.') != 0

work ok but require a "where" clause.

I think the best solution is probably:

SELECT TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' FROM ROUND(yourfield,3))) 
FROM yourtable

as it doesn't require a "where" clause, doesn't require any special code, and also lets you set the maximum precision of the number upfront.

-2

Taking fragments of the others answers in this page I came to this conclusion:

SELECT ( IF(
    myfield LIKE '%.%', 
    TRIM(TRAILING '.' FROM TRIM(TRAILING '0' FROM myfield)),
    myfield
) ) FROM mytable

Cheers

-19
SELECT TRIM(TRAILING '0' FROM yourodds)
FROM ...

Docs for the TRIM function.

7
  • 12
    Wouldn't that mean that numbers like "150" would be corrupted, turning into 15?
    – fooquency
    Mar 15, 2012 at 11:14
  • 1
    Aside from missing some cases, I think that this ultimately reinvents what MySQL will do with its built-in string to numeric type-casting functionality. Jan 31, 2015 at 2:15
  • 9
    it yields "3." for "3.0" and "3" for "30". Jul 1, 2015 at 10:43
  • 32
    This should NOT be the accepted answer as it's wrong and horrible and dangerous. The only correct answer is the one by Christopher McGowan
    – Jannes
    Nov 11, 2015 at 8:17
  • 1
    I get the same problem as @flaschenpost, Hariboo's answer below is the correct one. May 19, 2016 at 10:10

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