290

I'm trying to install doozer like this:

$ goinstall github.com/ha/doozer

I get these errors.

goinstall: os: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: fmt: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: io: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: reflect: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: math: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: rand: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: url: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: net: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: sync: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: runtime: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: strings: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: sort: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: strconv: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: bytes: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: log: go/build: package could not be found locally
goinstall: encoding/binary: go/build: package could not be found locally

15 Answers 15

279

GOPATH is discussed in the cmd/go documentation:

The GOPATH environment variable lists places to look for Go code. On Unix, the value is a colon-separated string. On Windows, the value is a semicolon-separated string. On Plan 9, the value is a list.

GOPATH must be set to get, build and install packages outside the standard Go tree.

GOROOT is discussed in the installation instructions:

The Go binary distributions assume they will be installed in /usr/local/go (or c:\Go under Windows), but it is possible to install the Go tools to a different location. In this case you must set the GOROOT environment variable to point to the directory in which it was installed.

For example, if you installed Go to your home directory you should add the following commands to $HOME/.profile:

export GOROOT=$HOME/go
export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin

Note: GOROOT must be set only when installing to a custom location.

(updated version of Chris Bunch's answer.)

  • 41
    Much more comprehensive information on GOPATH is at How to Write Go Code. A grasp of the information there is required for understanding the go command, which is essential for working with Go. For example the use of goinstall in the OP should now be go get. – Sonia Jun 1 '12 at 15:45
  • 11
    Also note the actual install path of go. For example, in a default homebrew setup, homebrew will install go in /usr/local/Cellar/go/. In this case the export path should be set with export GOROOT=/usr/local/Cellar/go/{version} and export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin. – ekillaby Mar 4 '13 at 16:32
  • 8
    I had to do export GOROOT=/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.2/libexec/ to get mine working with brew. – Steven Soroka Feb 7 '14 at 21:32
  • I can’t suggest this edit because the app complains that my edit “appears to contain” unformatted code (which it doesn’t; thanks a lot SO) but: – Wildcard May 15 at 15:41
  • Starting in Go 1.10, if GOROOT is unset the go tool will try to figure it out by its own location. I also can’t paste the link because paste doesn’t work in Stack Exchange’s iOS app. Very frustrated right now. – Wildcard May 15 at 15:43
92

Here is a my simple setup:

directory for go related things: ~/programming/go
directory for go compiler/tools: ~/programming/go/go-1.4
directory for go software      : ~/programming/go/packages

GOROOT, GOPATH, PATH are set as following:

export GOROOT=/home/user/programming/go/go-1.4
export GOPATH=/home/user/programming/go/packages
export PATH=$PATH:$GOROOT/bin:$GOPATH/bin

So, in short:

GOROOT is for compiler/tools that comes from go installation.
GOPATH is for your own go projects / 3rd party libraries (downloaded with "go get").

  • I think this answer is easier to understand as there's a mapping against the folder structure. – h-rai May 7 '18 at 11:35
  • Does GOPATH include entire project trees (e.g. git) with non-go files - e.g. images, scripts, build files, etc? – Serge Merzliakov May 17 at 1:44
44

First run go env.
If you see that the go isn't installed, you can install it via homebrew or via package and/or other ways.
If you are seeing output then your Go is installed.
It shows you all the envs that are set and are not.

If you see empty for GOROOT:

  1. Run which go (On my computer : /usr/local/go/bin/go)
  2. then export like this export GOROOT=/usr/local/go

If you see empty for GOPATH:

  1. Create any directory anywhere on your computer for go projects in my case: ~/GO_PROJECTS
  2. Then export GOPATH=~/GO_PROJECTS
  • 2
    which go did it for me. It was using another go installation location from a previous installation using Chocolatey. Deleted that folder and removed it from PATH variable. Now it works. Thanks! – sgarg May 25 '16 at 17:57
  • which go command did not work for me in Windows 7. How do I find where should I run this command – firstpostcommenter Apr 4 '18 at 12:55
  • The corresponding windows command is where go it will show you the path of the executed file – Falco Apr 5 at 11:48
  • export GOPATH=~/GO_PROJECTS did job – Thamaraiselvam Oct 2 at 19:38
39

GOPATH is discussed here:

The GOPATH Environment Variable

GOPATH may be set to a colon-separated list of paths inside which Go code, package objects, and executables may be found.

Set a GOPATH to use goinstall to build and install your own code and external libraries outside of the Go tree (and to avoid writing Makefiles).

And GOROOT is discussed here:

$GOROOT The root of the Go tree, often $HOME/go. This defaults to the parent of the directory where all.bash is run. If you choose not to set $GOROOT, you must run gomake instead of make or gmake when developing Go programs using the conventional makefiles.

  • so if I have go installed at ~/projects/go, what should the values of the variable be to find os, fmt, etc? – jshen Nov 1 '11 at 21:48
  • 2
    So where does Go install when you sudo apt-get install golang? – weberc2 Jan 11 '13 at 1:30
  • 8
    @weberc2 if you run go env you should see that information, for me it was /usr/lib/go/ – Andre Feb 4 '13 at 18:38
18

I read the go help gopath docs and was still incredibly confused, but found this little nugget from another go doc page:

The GOPATH environment variable specifies the location of your workspace. It is likely the only environment variable you'll need to set when developing Go code.

http://golang.org/doc/code.html#GOPATH

11

The GOPATH should not point to the Go installation, but rather to your workspace (see https://golang.org/doc/code.html#GOPATH). Whenever you install some package with go get or go install, it will land within the GOPATH. That is why it warns you, that you most definitely do not want random packages from the internet to be dumped into your official installation.

9

Starting with go 1.8 (Q2 2017), GOPATH will be set for you by default to $HOME/go

See issue 17262 and Rob Pike's comment:

$HOME/go it will be.
There is no single best answer but this is short and sweet, and it can only be a problem to choose that name if $HOME/go already exists, which will only happy for experts who already have go installed and will understand GOPATH.

  • How can a topic so simple become so complex! Thanks for the best answer here. – dodgy_coder Apr 19 '18 at 13:51
  • @dodgy_coder Actually... look at the first two lines of my other answer: stackoverflow.com/a/37905102/6309 ;) That might end up being even simpler: no more GOPATH at all! More details in stackoverflow.com/a/48914523/6309. – VonC Apr 19 '18 at 13:56
  • yes I agree, GOPATH is not really required if you go with the default, is that correct? I needed to set it anyway due to it being required for the Google App Engine (Go Standard) development environment. They actually tell you to set the GOPATH, but don't tell you what value to set it to..! – dodgy_coder Apr 20 '18 at 12:59
  • @dodgy_coder Yes, by default, Go will look for the project PATH in a fixed predetermined value. – VonC Apr 20 '18 at 13:01
6

As mentioned above:

The GOPATH environment variable specifies the location of your workspace.

For Windows, this worked for me (in Ms-dos window):

set GOPATH=D:\my_folder_for_go_code\

This creates a GOPATH variable that Ms-dos recognizes when used as follows:

cd %GOPATH%
2

Regarding GOROOT specifically, Go 1.9 will set it automatically to its installation path.
Even if you have multiple Go installed, calling the 1.9.x one will set GOROOT to /path/to/go/1.9 (before, if not set, it assumed a default path like /usr/local/go or c:\Go).

See CL Go Review 53370:

The go tool will now use the path from which it was invoked to attempt to locate the root of the Go install tree.
This means that if the entire Go installation is moved to a new location, the go tool should continue to work as usual.

This may be overriden by setting GOROOT in the environment, which should only be done in unusual circumstances.
Note that this does not affect the result of the runtime.GOROOT() function, which will continue to report the original installation location; this may be fixed in later releases.

-1

in osx, i installed with brew, here is the setting that works for me

GOPATH="$HOME/my_go_work_space" //make sure you have this folder created

GOROOT="/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.10/libexec"
-1

I had to append

export GOROOT=/usr/local/Cellar/go/1.10.1/libexec

to my ~/.bash_profile on Mac OS X

-1

There is also a case where when we use go it compiles all the go files.

So lets say we had one file main.go and later we changed the current file to main_old.go and then added our new main.go file. Then when we build our app all the go files will get compiled. So the error that's happening might be due to compilation error in some other go files.

-1

Once Go lang is installed, GOROOT is the root directory of the installation.

When I exploded Go Lang binary in Windows C:\ directory, my GOROOT should be C:\go. If Installed with Windows installer, it may be C:\Program Files\go (or C:\Program Files (x86)\go, for 64-bit packages)

 GOROOT = C:\go

while my GOPATH is location of Go lang source code or workspace.

If my Go lang source code is located at C:\Users\\GO_Workspace, your GOPATH would be as below:

 GOPATH = C:\Users\<xyz>\GO_Workspace
  • Source code like my src folder? – Varun Raj Sep 17 at 14:39
  • Source code would located at %GOPATH%\src – Anamika Sep 18 at 17:58
  • Do you have a good knowledge of go? – Varun Raj Sep 18 at 18:00
  • I need some help regarding some code. – Varun Raj Sep 18 at 18:08
-1

You don't need to explicitly set GOROOT (Modern versions of Go can figure it out on their own based on the location of the go binary that you run).

Also, got the follow error when trying to work with vgo:

go: modules disabled inside GOPATH/src by GO111MODULE=auto; see 'go help modules'

Removing GOROOT, updating my GOPATH and export GO111MODULE="on" resolved the issue.

GOPATH see in here

GOPATH may be set to a colon-separated list of paths inside which Go code, package objects, and executables may be found.

Set a GOPATH to use goinstall to build and install your own code and external libraries outside of the Go tree (and to avoid writing Makefiles).

-3

If you are using the distro go, you should point to where the include files are, for example:

$ rpm -ql golang | grep include
/usr/lib/golang/include

(This is for Fedora 20)

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