8

I have a string variable of 10 digits, if something less than 10 i need to append '0' before the variable. Example if the string is 9909909 it should be returned as 0009909909. how to do it in java

10 Answers 10

11

You can use leftPad function of StringUtils
So, it will look like this:

StringUtils.leftPad(myString, 10,"0");
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  • is there a situation that leftpad fails to add '0's ? – Rubbic Jun 14 '17 at 17:11
8

Try Apache StringUtils class.

import org.apache.commons.lang.StringUtils;
...

String seqNumber = "123"
int seqNumberLength = 10;
String result = StringUtils.leftPad(seqNumber, seqNumberLength,"0")

result is 0000000123

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7

This should do ya:

System.out.println("Number: " + String.format("%010d", 1));

The 'format string' portion given is defined here: http://download.oracle.com/javase/1,5.0/docs/api/java/util/Formatter.html#syntax

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  • Unfortunately this does not answer the question: pad a string with zeros. – Howard Nov 1 '11 at 18:01
  • Ah - I missed that. If it is a number stored in a string Integer.valueOf(str) can be used to convert it first. Otherwise I'd suggest using the Apache StringUtils. – Andy M. Nov 1 '11 at 18:08
  • If you update your answer with Integer.parseInt() then this is a good response. – Duncan Jones Sep 23 '14 at 8:19
7

There is some ways to do this. You can test performance of these methods creating unit tests. You'll need to test this by yourself: I wrote it without any kind of compilation:

  1. Use the Apache StringUtils package;

    StringUtils.leftPad(yourString, 10, "0");
    
  2. A trick to avoid a for/while statement:

    String newString = "0000000000".concat(yourString);
    newString = newString.substring(newString.length() - 10);
    
  3. A trick using replace:

    String newString = String.format("%10s", youString).replace(" ", "0");
    
  4. Using a classic while with StringBuilder:

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(yourString);
    int charsToGo = 10 - sb.length();
    while(charsToGo > 0) {
       sb.insert(0, '0');
       charsToGo--;
    }
    

You could encapsulate this developing a StringUtils class to avoid importing too many packages.

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6

Google Guava has method Strings.padStart() for this purpose:

Returns a string, of length at least minLength, consisting of string prepended with as many copies of padChar as are necessary to reach that length. For example,

padStart("7", 3, '0') returns "007"

padStart("2010", 3, '0') returns "2010"

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2
  1. Get the size of the string - String.size();
  2. if size is less than 10 then create a string with zeroes (however many you need). You can loop through.
  3. Concatenate the two string - with the "zeros string" being the first one.

Hope this helps!

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0
int value = 5;
String strValue = "" + value;

while (strValue.length() < 10) {
  strValue = "0" + strValue;
}

// strValue now equals "0000000005"
  • Replace value with whatever your actual number is
  • Replace 10 with whatever your limit is (if it's a fixed limit, consider using a final variable)
  • If this is a speed-critical operation, instead of plain String concatenation, consider using a StringBuffer or StringBuilder.

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  • 1
    I would argue that regardless if it's speed-critical or not you should use a StringBuilder. – Brian Roach Nov 1 '11 at 18:07
0
int zeroesNeeded = 10 - myString.length();
while(zeroesNeeded > 0)
{
   myString = "0" + myString;
   zeroesNeeded--;
}
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0
for (int i=0; i<(10-str.length); i++) {
    str = "0" + str;
}
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0

Use a StringBuilder and prepend zeroes until you get the desired length.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(myString);
while (sb.length() < 10)
{
    sb.insert(0,'0');
}
myString = sb.toString();
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