78

How would you flip 90 degrees (transpose) a multidimensional array in PHP? For example:

// Start with this array
$foo = array(
    'a' => array(
       1 => 'a1',
       2 => 'a2',
       3 => 'a3' 
    ),
    'b' => array(
       1 => 'b1',
       2 => 'b2',
       3 => 'b3' 
    ),
    'c' => array(
       1 => 'c1',
       2 => 'c2',
       3 => 'c3' 
    )
);

$bar = flipDiagonally($foo); // Mystery function
var_dump($bar[2]);

// Desired output:
array(3) {
  ["a"]=>
  string(2) "a2"
  ["b"]=>
  string(2) "b2"
  ["c"]=>
  string(2) "c2"
}

How would you implement flipDiagonally()?

Edit: this is not homework. I just want to see if any SOers have a more creative solution than the most obvious route. But since a few people have complained about this problem being too easy, what about a more general solution that works with an nth dimension array?

i.e. How would you write a function so that:

$foo[j][k][...][x][y][z] = $bar[z][k][...][x][y][j]

?(ps. I don't think 12 nested for loops is the best solution in this case.)

2
  • @Calvin I know it was many years ago (11!), yet.. have you accepted any answer or not? Have you noticed that the most popular answer is basically wrong, because doesn't support single-rows [[1,2,...N]]? Check out the sandbox for the illustration: sandbox.onlinephpfunctions.com/code/…
    – Onkeltem
    Feb 3 '20 at 1:22
  • Furthermore the splat operator cannot unpack string keys. Proof of the error: 3v4l.org/1WSQH ...whoops, I just realized that I said this over a year ago as an answer on this page! Jun 23 '20 at 13:20

13 Answers 13

259
+50
function transpose($array) {
    array_unshift($array, null);
    return call_user_func_array('array_map', $array);
}

Or if you're using PHP 5.6 or later:

function transpose($array) {
    return array_map(null, ...$array);
}
15
  • 20
    NULL is given as the parameter to array_unshift, which adds a value to the start of the array. So, the first line inserts NULL as the first value of the array. The next line calls array_map with all the entries of $array as the parameters. So it's the same as calling array_map(NULL, $array[0], $array[1], $array[2], etc etc). In the array_map documentation there's a detail: "An interesting use of this function is to construct an array of arrays, which can be easily performed by using NULL as the name of the callback function" Apr 26 '12 at 23:56
  • 14
    This function doesn't keep the indexes if they are of type String. It returns the transposed matrix with numeric index. The flipDiagonally function works fine in this case. Upvote anyways for simplicity
    – luso
    Aug 24 '12 at 14:45
  • 6
    This breaks down when there is only one row e.g. transpose( [[1,2]] ) Expected: [[1],[2]] Actual: [1,2]
    – chris
    Mar 16 '15 at 21:13
  • 4
    should be some description in the answer. Oct 14 '15 at 11:24
  • 3
    but why does this work? this answer is totally opaque to me
    – danimal
    Nov 26 '15 at 12:21
73

With 2 loops.

function flipDiagonally($arr) {
    $out = array();
    foreach ($arr as $key => $subarr) {
        foreach ($subarr as $subkey => $subvalue) {
            $out[$subkey][$key] = $subvalue;
        }
    }
    return $out;
}
5
  • 17
    Even though Codler's answer is more concise, I think that this is actually the better way to do it because it is so much more clear what is going on. If someone with coding experience but not a php guru were to look at the two answers, they would immediately understand what this one does but would have to read the fine print of the documentation to follow the other. +1
    – hackartist
    Feb 3 '12 at 23:05
  • On the contrary, I've found that this doesn't fare so well with non-numeric keys. For example $test = array(array('a'=>1, 'b'=>2,'c'=>3), array(4,5,6), array(7,8,9));: it creates a single-element array for each value with a non-numeric key. With specified numeric keys (e.g., $test = array(array(4,5,6), array(11=>1, 12=>2, 13=>3), array(7,8,9));), it does some weirdness. While by all rights this should work, I think we need a better solution!
    – JohnK
    Jul 14 '14 at 20:01
  • @JohnK [0][1] and [2][1] will become [1][0] and [1][2]. It flips the keys. I tried your examples and it works exactly as intended. Im not sure what you expected.
    – OIS
    Aug 4 '14 at 13:45
  • Has anyone profiled the two solutions? How well does the Codler's solution scale if count($arr) is really high?
    – donquixote
    Jul 5 '16 at 15:17
  • 1
    @donquixote Codler's solution is wrong. Badly. It doesn't support associative arrays and fails on the trivial edge case of single row/column: [[a,b,...,z]]. It must be devalued to not confuse people.
    – Onkeltem
    Feb 3 '20 at 1:13
8

I think you're referring to the array transpose (columns become rows, rows become columns).

Here is a function that does it for you (source):

function array_transpose($array, $selectKey = false) {
    if (!is_array($array)) return false;
    $return = array();
    foreach($array as $key => $value) {
        if (!is_array($value)) return $array;
        if ($selectKey) {
            if (isset($value[$selectKey])) $return[] = $value[$selectKey];
        } else {
            foreach ($value as $key2 => $value2) {
                $return[$key2][$key] = $value2;
            }
        }
    }
    return $return;
} 
0
3

Transposing an N-dimensional array:

function transpose($array, &$out, $indices = array())
{
    if (is_array($array))
    {
        foreach ($array as $key => $val)
        {
            //push onto the stack of indices
            $temp = $indices;
            $temp[] = $key;
            transpose($val, $out, $temp);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        //go through the stack in reverse - make the new array
        $ref = &$out;
        foreach (array_reverse($indices) as $idx)
            $ref = &$ref[$idx];
        $ref = $array;
    }
}

$foo[1][2][3][3][3] = 'a';
$foo[4][5][6][5][5] = 'b';

$out = array();
transpose($foo, $out);

echo $out[3][3][3][2][1] . ' ' . $out[5][5][6][5][4];

Really hackish, and probably not the best solution, but hey it works.

Basically it traverses the array recursively, accumulating the current indicies in an array.
Once it gets to the referenced value, it takes the "stack" of indices and reverses it, putting it into the $out array. (Is there a way of avoiding use of the $temp array?)

2

I needed a transpose function with support for associative array:

    $matrix = [
        ['one' => 1, 'two' => 2],
        ['one' => 11, 'two' => 22],
        ['one' => 111, 'two' => 222],
    ];

    $result = \array_transpose($matrix);

    $trans = [
        'one' => [1, 11, 111],
        'two' => [2, 22, 222],
    ];

And the way back:

    $matrix = [
        'one' => [1, 11, 111],
        'two' => [2, 22, 222],
    ];

    $result = \array_transpose($matrix);

    $trans = [
        ['one' => 1, 'two' => 2],
        ['one' => 11, 'two' => 22],
        ['one' => 111, 'two' => 222],
    ];

The array_unshift trick did not work NOR the array_map...

So I've coded a array_map_join_array function to deal with record keys association:

/**
 * Similar to array_map() but tries to join values on intern keys.
 * @param callable $callback takes 2 args, the intern key and the list of associated values keyed by array (extern) keys.
 * @param array $arrays the list of arrays to map keyed by extern keys NB like call_user_func_array()
 * @return array
 */
function array_map_join_array(callable $callback, array $arrays)
{
    $keys = [];
    // try to list all intern keys
    array_walk($arrays, function ($array) use (&$keys) {
        $keys = array_merge($keys, array_keys($array));
    });
    $keys = array_unique($keys);
    $res = [];
    // for each intern key
    foreach ($keys as $key) {
        $items = [];
        // walk through each array
        array_walk($arrays, function ($array, $arrKey) use ($key, &$items) {
            if (isset($array[$key])) {
                // stack/transpose existing value for intern key with the array (extern) key
                $items[$arrKey] = $array[$key];
            } else {
                // or stack a null value with the array (extern) key
                $items[$arrKey] = null;
            }
        });
        // call the callback with intern key and all the associated values keyed with array (extern) keys
        $res[$key] = call_user_func($callback, $key, $items);
    }
    return $res;
}

and array_transpose became obvious:

function array_transpose(array $matrix)
{
    return \array_map_join_array(function ($key, $items) {
        return $items;
    }, $matrix);
}
2

If you try to unpack the OP's sample data with the splat operator (...), you will generate:

Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Cannot unpack array with string keys

Proof

To overcome this error, call array_values() to index the first level keys before unpacking.

var_export(array_map(null, ...array_values($foo)));

Output:

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a1',
    1 => 'b1',
    2 => 'c1',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a2',
    1 => 'b2',
    2 => 'c2',
  ),
  2 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a3',
    1 => 'b3',
    2 => 'c3',
  ),
)

An additional feature/surprise regarding transposing with this technique is that null elements will be generated when the subarrays are of differing sizes ...but maybe not where you might expect.

From sample data like this:

$foo = array(
    'a' => array(
       1 => 'a1',
       2 => 'a2'
    ),
    'b' => array(
       1 => 'b1',
       3 => 'b3' 
    ),
    'c' => array(
       1 => 'c1',
       2 => 'c2',
       3 => 'c3' 
    )
);

The output is:

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a1',
    1 => 'b1',
    2 => 'c1',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a2',
    1 => 'b3',
    2 => 'c2',
  ),
  2 => 
  array (
    0 => NULL,
    1 => NULL,
    2 => 'c3',
  ),
)

Notice the level care exhibited by the function (comparable to the baggage handlers who take your luggage out of the belly of the plane). There is no attention to the original subarray values' ids (and it wouldn't matter if 1, 2, & 3 were x, y, & z); whatever comes off the conveyer belt gets thrown in the lowest available slot.

This behavior is consistent and reliable in delivering a complete matrix. A foreach() loop alternative will not natively deliver null element from subarrays of different sizes, and in most implementations its ability to access all subarray values depends on the length of the first subarray.

$foo = array(
    'a' => array(
       1 => 'a1',
       2 => 'a2'
    ),
    'b' => array(
       1 => 'b1',
    ),
    'c' => array(
       1 => 'c1',
       2 => 'c2',
       3 => 'c3' 
    )
);

foreach (current($foo) as $column => $not_used) {
    $result[] = array_column($foo, $column);
}
var_export($result);

Output:

array (
  0 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a1',
    1 => 'b1',
    2 => 'c1',
  ),
  1 => 
  array (
    0 => 'a2',
    1 => 'c2',
  ),
)

As shown above, if you wanted to be sure that you extracted ALL of the data from the input array, you'd have to write addition logic to deliver all unique column ids to the foreach loop.


p.s. before I learned of this shorthand transposing syntax, I wrote an uglier, more verbose functional transposer that copped some criticism.

1

I got confronted with the same problem. Here is what i came up with:

function array_transpose(array $arr)
{
    $keys    = array_keys($arr);
    $sum     = array_values(array_map('count', $arr));

    $transposed = array();

    for ($i = 0; $i < max($sum); $i ++)
    {
        $item = array();
        foreach ($keys as $key)
        {
            $item[$key] = array_key_exists($i, $arr[$key]) ? $arr[$key][$i] : NULL;
        }
        $transposed[] = $item;
    }
    return $transposed;
}
1
  • This answer is missing its plain English explanation. Mar 15 '20 at 11:59
1

Here's a variation of Codler/Andreas's solution that works with associative arrays. Somewhat longer but loop-less purely functional:

<?php
function transpose($array) {
    $keys = array_keys($array);
    return array_map(function($array) use ($keys) {
        return array_combine($keys, $array);
    }, array_map(null, ...array_values($array)));
}

Example:

<?php
$foo = array(
    "fooA" => [ "a1", "a2", "a3"],
    "fooB" => [ "b1", "b2", "b3"],
    "fooC" => [ "c1", "c2", "c3"]
);

print_r( transpose( $foo ));
// Output like this:
Array (
    [0] => Array (
        [fooA] => a1
        [fooB] => b1
        [fooC] => c1
    )

    [1] => Array (
        [fooA] => a2
        [fooB] => b2
        [fooC] => c2
    )

    [2] => Array (
        [fooA] => a3
        [fooB] => b3
        [fooC] => c3
    )
);
1
  • This is not "loopless", it is just "functional", in other words it is iterating without language constructs. Mar 15 '20 at 5:59
1

We can do this by using Two foreach. Traveling one array and another array to create new array
Like This:

$foo = array(
    'a' => array(
       1 => 'a1',
       2 => 'a2',
       3 => 'a3' 
    ),
    'b' => array(
       1 => 'b1',
       2 => 'b2',
       3 => 'b3' 
    ),
    'c' => array(
       1 => 'c1',
       2 => 'c2',
       3 => 'c3' 
    )
);

$newFoo = [];
foreach($foo as $a => $k){
   foreach($k as $i => $j){
       $newFoo[$i][]= $j;
   }
}

Check The Output

echo "<pre>";
print_r($newFoo);
echo "</pre>";
0

Before I start, I'd like to say thanks again to @quazardus for posting his generalised solution for tranposing any two dimenional associative (or non-associative) array!

As I am in the habit of writing my code as tersely as possible I went on to "minimizing" his code a little further. This will very likely not be to everybody's taste. But just in case anyone should be interested, here is my take on his solution:

function arrayMap($cb, array $arrays) // $cb: optional callback function
{   $keys = [];
    array_walk($arrays, function ($array) use (&$keys) 
                        { $keys = array_merge($keys, array_keys($array)); });
    $keys = array_unique($keys); $res = [];
    foreach ($keys as $key) {
      $items = array_map(function ($arr) use ($key)
                         {return isset($arr[$key]) ? $arr[$key] : null; },$arrays);
      $res[$key] = call_user_func(
        is_callable($cb) ? $cb 
                         : function($k, $itms){return $itms;},
        $key, $items);
    }
    return $res;
}

Now, analogous to the PHP standard function array_map(), when you call

arrayMap(null,$b);

you will get the desired transposed matrix.

1
  • There are certainly more direct/concise/efficient ways to gather the unique second level keys. For instance: $keys = array_keys(array_merge(...array_values($arrays))); a language construct will have less complexity and even better performance. Mar 15 '20 at 12:48
0

This is another way to do the exact same thing which @codler s answer does. I had to dump some arrays in csv so I used the following function:

function transposeCsvData($data)
{
    $ct=0;
    foreach($data as $key => $val)
    {
        //echo count($val);
        if($ct< count($val))
            $ct=count($val);
        }
    //echo $ct;
    $blank=array_fill(0,$ct,array_fill(0,count($data),null));
    //print_r($blank);

    $retData = array();
    foreach ($data as $row => $columns)
    {
        foreach ($columns as $row2 => $column2) 
        {
            $retData[$row2][$row] = $column2;
            }
        }
    $final=array();
    foreach($retData as $k=>$aval)
    { 
        $final[]=array_replace($blank[$k], $aval);
       }
    return $final;
    }

Test and output reference: https://tutes.in/how-to-transpose-an-array-in-php-with-irregular-subarray-size/

0

Here is array_walk way to achieve this,

function flipDiagonally($foo){
    $temp = [];
    array_walk($foo, function($item,$key) use(&$temp){
        foreach($item as $k => $v){
            $temp[$k][$key] = $v;     
        }
    });
    return $temp;
}
$bar = flipDiagonally($foo); // Mystery function

Demo.

-4
<?php

$tableau_init = [
    [
        "prenom" => "med",
        "age" => 1
    ],
    [
        "prenom" => "hassan",
        "age" => 2
    ],
    [
        "prenom" => "ali",
        "age" => 3
    ]
];

function transpose($tableau){
    $out = array();

    foreach ($tableau as $key => $value){
        foreach ($value as $subKey => $subValue){
            $out[$subKey][$key] = $subValue;
        }
    }

    echo json_encode($out);
}

transpose($tableau_init);

Try Like This

1
  • 1
    This looks like an unexplained exact replica of @OIS's solution. There is no value add in this answer. Mar 15 '20 at 12:50

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