13

My table field names are lowercase and the field names I get from CSV files are camelcase. Is there anyway I can convert the keys of an array of hashes to lowercase?

Here is the code I have right now:

    CSV.foreach(file, :headers => true) do |row|
      Users.create!(row.to_hash)
    end

This is failing because the keys are camel case (I've verified this by manually editing the file to make the header row all lowercase).

PS. Also I would love to know why the hell rails takes table field names' case sensitivity into play to begin with?

9 Answers 9

26

You can just use the header_converters option with CSV:

CSV.foreach(file, :headers => true, :header_converters => lambda { |h| h.try(:downcase) }) do |row|
  Users.create!(row.to_hash)
end

Important to put the .try in there since an empty header will throw an exception. Much better (and faster) than doing this on every row.

16

You can use something like this:

CSV.foreach(file, :headers => true) do |row|
  new_hash = {}
  row.to_hash.each_pair do |k,v|
   new_hash.merge!({k.downcase => v}) 
  end

  Users.create!(new_hash)
end

I had no time to test it but, you can take idea of it.
Hope it will help

4
  • That works! But I'm also curious as to why the heck rails would enforce case here (my file system isn't case sensitive so that is not the issue).
    – Hopstream
    Commented Nov 2, 2011 at 12:36
  • Excuse me, but I do not unserstand what do you mean saying: rails takes table field names' case sensitivity into play to begin with? :) (Maybe this is my bad english knowledge :) )
    – bor1s
    Commented Nov 2, 2011 at 13:47
  • Meaning why does rails require case of field names in table to match the keys in the hash during insertion
    – Hopstream
    Commented Nov 2, 2011 at 13:52
  • 3
    Why wouldn't it? Your DB is (probably) case-sensitive, and Rails just passes the names through. Commented Nov 2, 2011 at 13:57
10

You can simple do

hash.transform_keys(&:downcase)

to change hash keys to lowercase, or you can also transform hash values to lowercase or upper case as per your requirement.

hash.transform_values(&:downcase) or hash.transform_values(&:upcase)

hash = {:A=>"b", :C=>"d", :E=>"f"}
hash.transform_keys(&:downcase)
=> {:a=>"b", :c=>"d", :e=>"f"}
6

Since this was tagged with Rails.

With ActiveSupport starting vom version 3.0 you can use a HashWithIndifferentAccess.

That will allow lower/uppercase/symbol writing to access the keys or your Hash.

my_hash = { "camelCase": "some value" }
my_hash.with_indifferent_access[:camelcase] # 'some value'
my_hash.with_indifferent_access['camelcase'] # 'some value'
my_hash.with_indifferent_access['camelCase'] # 'some value'
my_hash.with_indifferent_access['CAMELCASE'] # 'some value'

ActiveSupport 4.0.2 also introduced this:

my_hash.deep_transform_keys!(&:downcase)
# or if your hash isn't nested:
my_hash.transform_keys!(&:downcase)
2
  • 6
    with_indifferent_access is supporting string-or-symbol, but is not case insensitive for me. ActiveSupport 5.0.4. Commented Jul 21, 2017 at 12:06
  • Same as Justin Maxwell here. I used an alternative instead.
    – el n00b
    Commented Apr 5, 2018 at 14:47
4

Ruby 1.9 provides quite a nice way to achieve this, using each_with_object to avoiding initialising a temporary variable.

CSV.foreach(file, :headers => true) do |row|
  new_hash = row.each_with_object({}) do |(k, v), h|
    h[k.downcase] = v
  end

  Users.create!(new_hash)
end
3

I find this approach more elegant:

hash_with_camelcase_keys.to_a.map { |pair| [pair.first.downcase, pair.last] }.to_h
1
  • 1
    to_a.map { |key, value| [key.upcase.to_s, value] }.to_h looks cleaner to me.
    – Sig
    Commented May 18, 2020 at 8:16
1

I would add the hash directly, more efficient than merge! because you're not creating a new hash for every pair.

CSV.foreach(file, :headers => true) do |row|
  new_hash = {}
  row.to_hash.each_pair do |k,v|
   new_hash[k.downcase] = v 
  end

  Users.create!(new_hash)
end
1

I found that this solution is significantly faster and a bit more "Rubyish".

CSV.foreach(file, :headers => true) do |row|
  new_hash = Hash[row.to_hash.map { |k, v| [k.downcase, v] }]
  Users.create!(new_hash)
end
1
  • Not sure it is more rubyish - it uses a class or module method which even uses a method ending in !
    – shevy
    Commented Jun 12, 2014 at 20:25
1

You could consider using underscore instead of downcase because this would also transform the CamelCase to camel_case notation, which is more Rubylike.

My personal preferences goes to using deep_transform_keys: hash.deep_transform_keys{|key| key.underscore.to_sym }

As transform_keys do not traverse the whole hash.

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